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Old 08-01-2011, 01:52 PM
 
236 posts, read 594,914 times
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Okay, DH has accepted a job out there and will be setting up a "temporary" household/apartment/condo. Temporary could be a few years but temporary in the sense that we are not selling our home and I will not be moving out there. I've received all kinds of other good info here about where he might possibly want to live.

He thinks he would like to live somewhere in the city (downtown, sugarhouse, etc.) That seems to be in the heart of the nasty inversion. I've read bits and pieces about this inversion thing but I don't have a grasp on how big of a deal this is.

So fill me in on this - what exactly is this, how bad is it and if one decided it were unbearable where do you have to live to avoid it?

thanks
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Old 08-01-2011, 02:08 PM
 
23 posts, read 52,675 times
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you aren't going to escape it unless you move so far (from where his job is) that the extra commute isn't worth it.

To me, last year being my first year, it wasn't that big of a deal. It certainly is ugly. But, typically, after a couple days there is some wind that blows things out. There was only one time where this past winter that I actually started really noticing it in my breathing and "tasting" it. The air had been stale for about a week. Just as I was thinking, "this really sucks" there was a windstorm that cleared it all out. It also seemed to disappear and not really be an issue at all for the last half of winter. No idea if last year was typical or not, but, all I know is that it kind of made me reappreciate how stuningly beautiful the mountains are when they'd "reappear" after being hidden for a few days.
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Old 08-01-2011, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
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I have asthma so I watch the 'red air" alert days on the TV weather forecast. I stay indoors on those days and I don't have a problem. The very young, elderly, and anyone with lung issues are warned to stay indoors. I used to ignore it and I wheezed. Now I don't. I think the worst one lasted maybe 6 days? Can't remember. Just don't go jogging/walking during one and you won't hae problems at any age/health.
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Old 08-01-2011, 03:22 PM
 
236 posts, read 594,914 times
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Okay - so this is something that comes and goes. In the winter only correct? What % of the time would you say you have this condition? It sounds similar to our air quality warnings although I never notice much of anything when we have those - other than a bit of haze. They are rare where we live (MN). He does have mild asthma though and likes to run. He completely ignores any air quality warnings here though and it doesn't seem to affect him. He will just deal with it. He definitely wouldn't find it worth living a long ways away to avoid it.

By the way I'm making my first visit in late August - we are hoping to decide on a place for him to live while I'm there. Then I will be back sometime after that to help him set up his man cave.
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Old 08-01-2011, 04:53 PM
 
Location: east millcreek
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We do get some " air action" days in the summer-more of the Ozone thing where in the winter it is particulate matter..Our summer has been quite mild with only one day above 100 so I have only seen the Ozone alert once or twice.
There really is no way to predict how the " inversion season" will shape up as it is weather dependent. L
The inversion forms when cold air is trapped at the ground and warmer air is above it-Salt Lake is in a bowl so that bowl adds to the "trapping" if you will..if weather systems move through on a frequent basis, the wind that comes with the system mixes the atmosphere and if the winds are strong enough, the inversion is gone.
I do not suffer ill effects from the stuff and as Hilgi only sees the stuff when he looks across to the East side, I only see the stuff when I look across to the West side.
I guess a person could rent a place up in the Cottonwood Canyons to " live" above it and then you incur another set of problems with 4x4 with Snow tire requirements/ road closures..Don't let people tell you that Park City is free of inversions cuz it's not..I lived up there for 15 years and continued working up there for 2 winters after we moved and there is " stuff" there too..
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Old 08-01-2011, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Castle Rock, Co
1,614 posts, read 2,993,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibby3000 View Post
Okay - so this is something that comes and goes. In the winter only correct? What % of the time would you say you have this condition? It sounds similar to our air quality warnings although I never notice much of anything when we have those - other than a bit of haze. They are rare where we live (MN). He does have mild asthma though and likes to run. He completely ignores any air quality warnings here though and it doesn't seem to affect him. He will just deal with it. He definitely wouldn't find it worth living a long ways away to avoid it.

By the way I'm making my first visit in late August - we are hoping to decide on a place for him to live while I'm there. Then I will be back sometime after that to help him set up his man cave.
I only went through 2 winters there so I may not have seen as much as some of these people have but each year there was probably less than 3-4 weeks of inversion while I was there. It would last for a week or so then blow out, another would develop a few weeks later and stay for a week or so then repeat the pattern. Sure, its impossible to say how long or how often but dont be alarmed that your going to be sitting in smog for the whole winter
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Old 08-01-2011, 08:50 PM
 
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Thanks all - very helpful.
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Old 08-01-2011, 11:26 PM
 
Location: South Jordan, Utah
7,855 posts, read 8,288,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibby3000 View Post
Okay - so this is something that comes and goes. In the winter only correct? What % of the time would you say you have this condition? It sounds similar to our air quality warnings although I never notice much of anything when we have those - other than a bit of haze. They are rare where we live (MN). He does have mild asthma though and likes to run. He completely ignores any air quality warnings here though and it doesn't seem to affect him. He will just deal with it. He definitely wouldn't find it worth living a long ways away to avoid it.

By the way I'm making my first visit in late August - we are hoping to decide on a place for him to live while I'm there. Then I will be back sometime after that to help him set up his man cave.
The upside is it usually very cold when we have the worst inversion, you don't really want to hang outside that much anyway.
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Old 08-02-2011, 12:20 PM
 
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These past 2 winters I have had to go to SLC for work constantly--I didn't live there, but often spent 8am-5pm in the city proper. I have no breathing/lung conditions, and to be honest, I did not notice the inversion whatsoever. Didn't feel it, smell it.... nothing. From my perspective it was like a phantom that existed only on the TV news. I came from big cities where you can feel the nasty air (literally, in your nose and eyes at the end of each day), and IMO by comparison the inversion is a nonentity. Based on what I personally have experienced firsthand, I would not hesitate to live within city limits because of air quality.
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Old 08-02-2011, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
25,547 posts, read 26,220,783 times
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For me, it's more of a "seeing it" thing than a "feeling it or smelling it" thing. It's ugly. Real ugly. But it doesn't last forever.
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