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Old 09-04-2006, 09:52 AM
 
3 posts, read 42,831 times
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I plan to move to Whispering Hills in Spring Branch north of San Antonio. These homes are on their own private wells as are many in the Hill Country. I've heard of wells drying up due to the drought, but also because the aquifer, especially the Trinity, is being over used. I rarely hear people talking about it, but should I be concerned? Should I even buy a place with a well?
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Old 09-04-2006, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
2,393 posts, read 9,084,051 times
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We have a well at our ranch (outside of Boerne) and have never had it dry up on us at all. I would think its got to get really bad here for them rto dry up but I am also not sure how deep our well is but I think my dad once told me that it was pretty deep for a well.
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Old 09-04-2006, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Missouri
2,815 posts, read 12,481,072 times
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Default Well water

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimr View Post
I plan to move to Whispering Hills in Spring Branch north of San Antonio. These homes are on their own private wells as are many in the Hill Country. I've heard of wells drying up due to the drought, but also because the aquifer, especially the Trinity, is being over used. I rarely hear people talking about it, but should I be concerned? Should I even buy a place with a well?
Make part of your purchase agreement dependent upon a successful well-water test to make sure the water is pure and contaminant-free, other than that, HELL YES!!! You want well water if you can get it! It's the best source of pure chemical-free water you can drink and far healthier than the municipal water supplies which are periodically infected by giardia, too much chlorine, and worst of all (well...not worse than Giardia outbreaks of course... ), Flouride...a true poison. Read up on what Flouride does to your gums and teeth over time, and about it's status as a deadly poison.... You'll be very happy you have a well. I do and I drink that water by the gallons without fear. I have no idea how deep my well is either and we're in a serious drought here in southwest Missouri, but... it can be dug deeper if need be. It's worth it Jimr.
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Old 09-04-2006, 12:15 PM
 
3 posts, read 42,831 times
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Default Well

Thank you both for the encouragement. We almost bought in Boerne, what a great town. We'll be close enough to visit often. We'll definitely have the test.
Thanks, again.
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Old 09-04-2006, 02:20 PM
 
679 posts, read 2,707,816 times
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I read that if you dig 600 feet, you will never have problems with a well drying up? Is that true? Also, since Hill Country has such rocky soil, is the cost of digging the well more? Do they have problems digging through the rock? Anybody have any idea of the cost for digging the well? I know what I have read, but not sure if all of it is so.
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Old 09-04-2006, 04:42 PM
 
3 posts, read 42,831 times
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I've heard that the aquifer has different layers where the water has different minerals & taste, but I don't know about the depth. I heard it varies with each location. Don't know about the rocky soil. I'm sure the cost will vary with the depth, but I've heard the number $4,000.
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Old 09-04-2006, 05:12 PM
 
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$4,000 is not too bad. I read it was around $1,000 a foot. Well worth $6k, not to have to worry about your water. As far as taste...the less, the better. I remember tasting some water on my dad's property, in Indiana, that tasted like oil. Made me so sick.
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Old 07-27-2009, 03:59 PM
 
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Wells can dry up.. I expect to see quite a few drying up very soon.

I just built a house in rural Travis county with a well.
A few things:
1) The water quality is typically not good. TX has a lot of agricultural run off and that can mean fecal coliform.
2) Even with non-coliform contaminants, the typical water pulled from a well into the Trinity is *extremely* hard - meaning a huge amount of dissolved solids. Our well tested out at 200% over the levels that are recommended for agricultural / livestock use.

3) Expense. If you can do 100' for $1000, you're doing much better than I am. I paid almost $15,000 for a well drilled just short of 500'. I had 3 drillers bidding and they were all about the same price.

The well drillers guarantee nothing. They don't guarantee that they'll hit water, they don't guarantee water quality, they simply drill a hole in exchange for $$$. If you don't find what you're looking for you need to drill deeper or start over at a new location and pay again.

The BEST way in my opinion to figure out what you're going to end up with in regard to a well is visit neighbors with wells - ask about their water quality.. Do they drink it? Do they cook with it? HAve they ever run out of water? Has their water ever been tested?


In my experience - the best water would come from a rain collection system. Either you have a HUGE tank or you'd need a well back up.


Ask me about water treatment options - I've learned a ton and now implement systems (wholesale) to treat my water. Most water treatment systems have a huge mark up of 200-400% and may or may not be the right system for your water.

Never buy a system from a company that doesn't test the water. A LAB test is really required - some on site testing can be done, but they can't do everything that a lab can. IMHO avoid companies like Culligan - who have many levels of marketing and a strong "sales" side - the sales guys are sales guys, not water guys.

Ping me if you need you water tested, I can refer you to a good out of state lab at about 1/2 the price of anything I've found in TX. You HAVE to test the water - tasting it isn't enough, smelling it means nothing in most cases.
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Old 07-27-2009, 04:02 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
12,089 posts, read 13,750,227 times
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Just be informed, they are not cheap to fix!! I just spent $2200.00 to get mine repaired. granted it's the first major repair in 18 years but still...
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Old 07-27-2009, 04:09 PM
 
5,642 posts, read 14,795,608 times
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Water well on a piece of property near Fredericksburg was around 220ft deep. I believe it cost them 5k to drill it. Of course, this is not including any other items that are needed to actually USE the water. I do know that the water in this area was very very clean and pristine.
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