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Old 10-03-2007, 04:41 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
1,532 posts, read 3,495,301 times
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I was wondering if anyone knew anything about the flood plains in SA. I have been looking at neighborhoods but I don't want to end up on a flood plain. I looked at the Bella Vista neighborhood and it looks like it is on a flood plain. Anyone know?? Any info? Thanks!
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Old 10-03-2007, 05:18 PM
 
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It shouldn't be. Title search would show that well before you get into contract status. The builder would have to have special flood insurance and they're obligated by law to disclose if it is.
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Old 10-03-2007, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Earth
226 posts, read 864,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mojokitty View Post
I was wondering if anyone knew anything about the flood plains in SA. I have been looking at neighborhoods but I don't want to end up on a flood plain. I looked at the Bella Vista neighborhood and it looks like it is on a flood plain. Anyone know?? Any info? Thanks!
I would recommend calling an insurance agent to verify whether or not a specific home is on a flood plain. I believe there are three categories of flood plains.

I am having a home built on flood plain C - low risk. Every homesite should fit into one of the three categories.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:17 AM
 
781 posts, read 3,651,005 times
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One resource is Google Earth. You can see the elevation on the map and as you move the map it will reflect the low lying areas as well as how the land slopes. Knowing where the dry creek beds are can also be extremely helpful.

Also, I believe, if I remember correctly, that there are areas in San Antonio and surroundings cities that are being reviewed for possible inclusion as flood prone areas and they would require flood insurance.

Here is a FEMA link to look at.....FEMA Map Service Center -

Good Luck....PS you can view the maps without purchasing them:-)

Last edited by martinez4; 10-04-2007 at 08:18 AM.. Reason: add note
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:59 AM
 
168 posts, read 452,266 times
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Default Flood plains -- West Bexar County

There are flood plain areas in west Bexar county but most lots in a subdivision will not be affected. You should also have a thorough title search done to check for this and I believe it is something that MUST be disclosed in the sales process.

I just checked and it seems the east side of Palatine Hill is most vulnerable. On higher ground out there, there is virtually no risk of flooding except for the usual rush of rain water that appears when it rains. Drainage is most likely the biggest problem but it is hilly. Pick a site on the top of the hill or at least near it.

For what it's worth, there are subdivisions all up and down Potranco. If you go out to Red Bird Ranch just before you get to the Medina County line, you can look at that subdivision. The reason it was named Red Bird Ranch is because of the large Red Cardinal population in the area. It's really something but Cardinals are all over including Bella Vista.

There are three quick sources for you to check online:

BRWM
> Look for the digital map search(which hasn't worked for me)

AND

Bexar Appraisal District
> Choose Map Search
> Find area and zoom in
> Select Flood Plain Display option on map legend--left hand side

AND

" + theTitle + " (http://maps.sanantonio.gov/website/Contours/viewer.htm - broken link)
> Find area and zoom in(Keep zooming in, the streets will eventually appear)
> Select Flood Plain Display option on map legend
Select all Flood Plain options under HYDROLOGY


Quote:
Originally Posted by mojokitty View Post
I was wondering if anyone knew anything about the flood plains in SA. I have been looking at neighborhoods but I don't want to end up on a flood plain. I looked at the Bella Vista neighborhood and it looks like it is on a flood plain. Anyone know?? Any info? Thanks!
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Old 10-04-2007, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Diyallusss, TX
1,805 posts, read 4,517,850 times
Reputation: 559
MOJO KITTY!!!!!

IMPORTANT!!!

Be sure to also check, in addition to any flood map that may appear for your specific property location, for any possible LOMC...
sometimes known also as an LOMA

These are Letter Of Map Change
or
Letter of Map Amendment

They are issued fairly frequently and FEMA DOES sometimes consider an area 'removed' from the flood plain map. These are based on time periods calculated from when the area was first designated as a flood plain and other geologic information. The map will continue to be listed and displayed, for historical purposes, but BE SURE TO CHECK TO SEE IF THERE WAS A LOMC/LOMA!!!!

And, contrary to another post, an Insurance Agent will NOT have knowledge of flood plain areas or any particular access to same. A map or a LOMA may go through an agent who is writing coverage for a specific address for a specific client, but it is actually the owner/buyer of the house that has to provide the information to the carrier, not vice versa.
The mortgage lender on the other hand, you can BET YOUR you-know-what on it.... THEY will have access to and will require flood plain maps.
It sounds like right now, though, you just want to view it as you 'shop' for property.
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Old 10-04-2007, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Earth
226 posts, read 864,688 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by PopsGuysRule View Post
MOJO KITTY!!!!!

IMPORTANT!!!

Be sure to also check, in addition to any flood map that may appear for your specific property location, for any possible LOMC...
sometimes known also as an LOMA

These are Letter Of Map Change
or
Letter of Map Amendment

They are issued fairly frequently and FEMA DOES sometimes consider an area 'removed' from the flood plain map. These are based on time periods calculated from when the area was first designated as a flood plain and other geologic information. The map will continue to be listed and displayed, for historical purposes, but BE SURE TO CHECK TO SEE IF THERE WAS A LOMC/LOMA!!!!

And, contrary to another post, an Insurance Agent will NOT have knowledge of flood plain areas or any particular access to same. A map or a LOMA may go through an agent who is writing coverage for a specific address for a specific client, but it is actually the owner/buyer of the house that has to provide the information to the carrier, not vice versa.
The mortgage lender on the other hand, you can BET YOUR you-know-what on it.... THEY will have access to and will require flood plain maps.
It sounds like right now, though, you just want to view it as you 'shop' for property.
Well as far as an "insurance agent" not having knowledge. Let me clarify I talked to USAA flood insurance department and they did provide me information on which flood zone my potential home would be in. They even told me if the flood zone maps for my area are under consideration to be changed. I got in writing from them that my potential home address is in flood zone c - it was emailed to me.

Now I can't speak for other insurance companies, but USAA was very responsive to helping me determine whether or not a potential home is or is not at high risk for flooding.

I got the word from the "horses mouth" the insurance company that would provide the flood insurance. It's a lot better than trying to figure it out on your own.
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Old 10-04-2007, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Diyallusss, TX
1,805 posts, read 4,517,850 times
Reputation: 559
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe123456 View Post
Well as far as an "insurance agent" not having knowledge. Let me clarify I talked to USAA flood insurance department and they did provide me information on which flood zone my potential home would be in. They even told me if the flood zone maps for my area are under consideration to be changed. I got in writing from them that my potential home address is in flood zone c - it was emailed to me.

Now I can't speak for other insurance companies, but USAA was very responsive to helping me determine whether or not a potential home is or is not at high risk for flooding.

I got the word from the "horses mouth" the insurance company that would provide the flood insurance. It's a lot better than trying to figure it out on your own.
Well, yes, I can easily imagine that from USAA. I guess I should have been more specific. An agent/most agents, would generally not have that info, they would have to access it from a website, just like the one that was linked on this thread. Insurance carriers don't just have immediate access to them; they write coverage for multiple locations and it wouldn't be feasible to have immediate access to information about really, an infinite number of locations.
But it has usually already been made available from the mortgage lender who is really the one with the highest level of interest in having adequate insurance. You can be certain that the lender has checked this out THOROUGHLY before they even agree to approve a loan, let alone fund it. And they have more experience in pulling an accurate document from the FEMA site. I seem to recall there was another site other than FEMA that also posts flood maps and LOMA/LOMC's, but I just can't think of it... So, you see, USAA probably just got it from their very own mortgage lending department.... down the hall or in the next building over or whatever... even if they didn't write the mortgage, the mtg dept could easily and quickly get docs for the ins dept......
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Old 10-05-2007, 07:11 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
545 posts, read 2,164,661 times
Reputation: 215
There was an interesting documentary on PBS not too long ago that dealt with the flood plains and the flooding in south Texas, focused mainly on the Guadalupe watershed. It was interesting to see that even the flood plain maps are affected by politics, as the 100 year flood plain in New Braunfels is not really where floods have actually happened. In fact, the documentary said that the 100 year flood plain has been exceeded in the New Braunfels area over a dozen times in the last 100 years. Buyer beware...

Flash Flood Alley Home Page
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