U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > San Antonio
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-26-2012, 10:54 AM
 
80 posts, read 92,078 times
Reputation: 97

Advertisements

We have a leak in the exterior wall of our home due to the builder's error in construction. They agreed it was their fault and are honoring the warranty by making repairs. They've removed the drywall where the leak was and there appears to be mold. They immediately sprayed bleach on it and wanted to cover it up but I told them to keep it open till I figure out what to do.

I'm worried about future ramifications. I know mold is a touchy subject but I want to know what we should be doing to protect our family in the future. Do I need to hire a mold investigator and if so, are there any recommendations?

Thanks!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-26-2012, 11:11 AM
 
4,145 posts, read 9,964,239 times
Reputation: 3330
From a Realtor's perspective: Mold is definitely a touchy subject on inspections. The best thing you can do is just document EVERYTHING. Get copies of all the builder's invoices (even if they're $0). Take pictures of the open wall afterwards before closing it up, etc. Keep any and all paperwork. If there's an insurance claim, when you sell the house, the buyer's insurance company will run a CLUE report (like a carfax for a house) and see it on there. Just disclose it on the Seller's Disclosure to cover your tail and you should be fine.

If you WANT to have a mold remediation company come in and do air tests you can, but be forewarned it's not cheap. If you think you have a serious problem, I'd have the builder do it. If you think that the builder has found and remedied everything to your satisfaction, that's your call, but you SHOULD be fine. Just disclose, disclose, disclose when you sell.

I know personally if I have a buyer that's buying a house and there is a disclosure of previous mold, we just have the inspector pay close attention to it and if it's been remedied, we won't let it kill a deal. There are some buyers out there that are just so scared by mold that they'll never buy a house with it, but don't let that small amount of people dictate what you do. Most have common sense and will do their due diligence.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2012, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,721 posts, read 16,893,156 times
Reputation: 11162
Yeah Bob, back in the 90's mold was a real money making scam for the remediators. I got my license and I'll be first in line to tell you what the guy said from the State that was teaching the course- You can't make the dough if you don't put on the show. Get the idea. There were molds where your house is for millions of years. They are in your house now, they are in the air, they are in your freshly washed clothes. When they grow folks get excited. Lawyers made a killing with these folks that never understood what they are and how to deal with them. The builder has performed the right treatment. But if you feel uneasy about it, go to any Dollar Store and buy some CHEAP spray gloss white paint and spray the area. That will encapsulate anything that is there. The key is cheap spray paint as the vehicle of the paint will also kill anything there. But it's not necessary at all. Once dead, there is no such thing as a Lazurus mold, it's not coming back. Mold requires several things to survive, take one away and they die. In your case, take the moisture away and it's over.

I know this is kinda out of the spectrum of the post but if the builder schedules the drywall repairs and you deny them, the builder can elect to close the warranty on the home. Most will attempt to work with the homeowner as word of mouth advertising and happy home owners are far better than the alternative. If you want to spray paint the area, get it done and have them schedule the work soon. They're only going to get along with you just so far over the mold issue and then they're going to close the warranty.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2012, 12:45 PM
 
80 posts, read 92,078 times
Reputation: 97
Thanks for the responses, we appreciate it!

We're getting a lot of rain now so I'm glad they are going to keep it exposed so we can see if they've corrected the issue properly.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2012, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
679 posts, read 1,703,828 times
Reputation: 512
Try not to fret too much. We have dealt with mold in our home due to some plumbing issues. We replaced some of the drywall and insulation but no studs or major demo. No one has gotten sick, it doesn't smell, it's not spreading. DH and I were not willing to rip out an entire bathroom to deal with the mold we couldn't access easily. In fact, I'd be willing to bet MOST homes have some degree of mold inside them. But agree with others it's a good idea to document everything JIC.

Interesting what TrapperL has to say, that has always been my suspicion!!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2012, 04:04 PM
 
192 posts, read 212,897 times
Reputation: 218
Remediation contractors may be like posted, but I only do inspections and can't profit from remediation. Makes me feel that I'm more unbiased

Their workmanship caused the mold. They should make sure the leak is fixed and remove all components that have mold. If a component can't be removed take the surface down past the root of the mold. Bleach can kill the head (flower), but probably won't kill the root. Once the mold is dead from the bleach ... spores can fly off even easier, so in a way, they made the situation worse.

A mold inspector not connected in anyway to a remediation contractor could help ease your mind.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2012, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
679 posts, read 1,703,828 times
Reputation: 512
I have also heard that putting bleach on mold can be more harmful to your health than the mold itself. Bleach is not very good for you.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2012, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Here
11,547 posts, read 13,215,895 times
Reputation: 6863
1. Stop the leak
2. Cut out damaged drywall, insulation, etc 2 ft beyond area of mold
3. Spray germicide (bleach works) on framing
4. Replace insulation and drywall
5. Get on with your life

Mold was such an overblown issue back in the early 2000's thanks to attorneys scaring the hell out of people and insurance companies not understanding how to address it. "Remediation" companies would come in with TyVac suits and respirators acting like they were handling the Ebola virus. It was pathetic and lined the pockets of these companies along with the attorneys. Mold is Gold was their battle cry of the day. Premiums SKYROCKETED as a result of this from 2000-2006 at which time the carriers finally figured out the scam.

As Kev mentioned, I'd simply avoid the hassle and handle ANY water loss out of pocket in order to avoid getting the insurance company involved and in turn having the matter come up when you go to sell the house on down the road. To this day, people are still clueless as relates mold and having it show up could frighten away ignorant buyers.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2012, 02:57 PM
 
4,145 posts, read 9,964,239 times
Reputation: 3330
01Snake is going to be the one to listen to on insurance issues
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2012, 07:50 AM
 
1,175 posts, read 1,342,704 times
Reputation: 1335
Quote:
Originally Posted by cinnamon_toast View Post
I have also heard that putting bleach on mold can be more harmful to your health than the mold itself. Bleach is not very good for you.
As long as you're not mixing it with anything other than water, and not drinking, licking it or otherwise ingesting it there's nothing wrong with using bleach.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
>
Powered by Foreclosure.com
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > San Antonio
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:43 PM.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top