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Old 03-10-2021, 08:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NBTX11 View Post
Sounds like you have Sabal Mexicana (Texas Sabal Palm) palm trees. These trees have thick trunks and virtually no damage. Could also be Washingtonia Filifera (California Fan Palm), however those have damage to them to a degree, but will recover as well.
I looked up those two names. What I have closely resembles Sabal Mexicana. Definitely don't have Washintonia Filifera.

Only two of them (I have five total) have those really annoying sharp, pointy edges along the branch. They are the only trees I don't trim myself because 1) they are too tall and 2) those sharp edges are dangerous.
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Old 03-10-2021, 09:25 AM
 
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It seems like there is some good info and many responses to the freeze impacts on one form of vegitation (palm trees - many will survive so don't cut them down prematurely) but what about the rest of the Vegetation in San Antonio and the freeze impacts to them?

Bermuda grass, trees that aren't palm etc
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Old 03-10-2021, 09:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NBTX11 View Post
The palms should not have been cut down yet. But hey, it's their trees and if they want to waste money cutting down a potentially live tree, it's their money. I have seen many palm trees come back from the "dead". Brown leaves does not equal dead. As long as the tree can produce new leaves from the trunk eventually, it can recover. If you don't see any green by mid summer, cut it down.
I still take issue with "The Urban Foresters" and others spreading blatantly bad/incorrect advice and potentially damaging/killing trees by testing them (palms do not heal like other trees).

I will not cut down my palms unless there are no signs of life by late summer. That is not the issue.

The issue is that for those of us who are palm lovers and enjoy seeing palms when walking/driving, either in others yards or commercial properties (anyone familiar with First Colony Mall by Cheesecake Factory). If these people are given bad advice from people like TUFs, they will prematurely cut down palms and likely replace them with non palms making the area decidedly less palmy.

That really sucks for palm lovers. That is why I take issue and they should STOP giving bad advice by prematurely cutting them down or damaging/killing an otherwise recovering tree by "testing" it. That is the issue.
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Old 03-10-2021, 09:50 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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It looks like my young citrus trees got hit by the frost. All leaves are yellow and hanging there, but I am not cutting off any branches yet - will wait for new leaves , then go from there. Same with fig trees.
Grass seems to be recovering, just need some food. Weed thrives, of course. Big bugs didn't die either

Generally, the best way is hold on with any cuttings and see if life comes back to your damaged vegetation. Give them time and don't act prematurely.
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Old 03-10-2021, 09:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txbullsfan View Post
It seems like there is some good info and many responses to the freeze impacts on one form of vegitation (palm trees - many will survive so don't cut them down prematurely) but what about the rest of the Vegetation in San Antonio and the freeze impacts to them?

Bermuda grass, trees that aren't palm etc
I have some citrus trees that took a beating. Kumquat and Blood Orange. They look pretty dead right now but I am waiting to see if they make a comeback.

Everything else tree-wise seemed to pull through or only had some minor damage. (Persimmon, Pecans, Loquat, Fig , etc).
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Old 03-10-2021, 09:58 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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Here is some advice I posted on Houston Forum:
https://www.statesman.com/story/life...nt/4548153001/

Exception: Plants that have gone to “mush” may be removed or trimmed back. These include succulents, Agaves, tropical plants and herbaceous perennials. The longer you leave them, the smellier they will get. Any annuals that have collapsed should be removed. Perennials such as Society Garlic may be clipped off at the soil line, as they may come back from the roots.

A broad generalization: Plants that end up shedding their leaves have a greater chance of recovering from a freeze than those that hold onto dead leaves. Shedding leaves can indicate living stem tissue, and depending on species, may offer a ray of hope. Plants that hold onto leaves have stems that are likely dead.

(My citrus trees are holding onto the leaves, but I scratched the branches a bit and there is green to see, so I am not sure about that).

Extensive listing of plants here:
https://backbonevalleynursery.com/af...e-freeze-2021/
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Last edited by elnina; 03-10-2021 at 10:28 AM..
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Old 03-10-2021, 09:59 AM
 
1,505 posts, read 601,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azure110 View Post
I have some citrus trees that took a beating. Kumquat and Blood Orange. They look pretty dead right now but I am waiting to see if they make a comeback.

Everything else tree-wise seemed to pull through or only had some minor damage. (Persimmon, Pecans, Loquat, Fig , etc).
I'm not sure what trees I have but they are fast growing, fairly new (2 years), tall and thin and lose their leaves every winter. They are normally budding by now but they aren't yet. Bermuda grass is still not greening up except blades here and there. Wonder if a large portion of that bit the bullet and will have to re-seed / re-sod.
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Old 03-10-2021, 11:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azure110 View Post
I looked up those two names. What I have closely resembles Sabal Mexicana. Definitely don't have Washintonia Filifera.

Only two of them (I have five total) have those really annoying sharp, pointy edges along the branch. They are the only trees I don't trim myself because 1) they are too tall and 2) those sharp edges are dangerous.
If it looks similar to a Sabal Mexicana but not exact, it could also be a Sabal Palmetto (Florida Sabal). Although they have slightly thinner trunks and smaller crowns than Sabal Mexicana. Sabal Palmettos were not damaged in this freeze in San Antonio.
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Old 03-10-2021, 12:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txbullsfan View Post
My concern is my Bermuda grass. Usually by this time of year it's greening up. Now it looks shocked, brown and dormant or dead. The only thing thriving are the weeds. There are some green blades here and there coming through but it's sporadic and few.

Do I use my topical liquid Bermuda weed killer spray for active growing weeds all over my yard through my hose bottle attachment like I do every year (too many weeds to individually spray each weed)? Do I grainular weed and feed to apply the pre-emergent to prevent weeds from coming back in the future that I typically do this time of year or is it too early because of shocked, non feeding and growing plants? Only feed? Do I cut grass to remove what may be a dead top layer of grass or wait? If I cut, what length? Do I bag, when typically mulching puts clippings back into soil for nutrition? Etc.

I've heard and read so many conflicting things regarding frost / prolonged deep freeze, our winter storm and Bermuda grass and how to revive / Jumpstart it. I've called local landscaping companies here in SA and read multiple articles with conflicting information.

Some say water and weed and feed (granular) like normal. Some say don't use granular weed and feed right now but use the liquid. Some say mow 1 setting higher. Some say mow a few settings lower (not scalp though). Some say bag the dead clippings. Some say "just thatch and water".

I don't want to do anything detrimental to my yard so I have to re-sod my yard. I also want to be proactive and get it Jumpstarted and off on the right foot for the year.

It's unfortunate there is no reliable, consistent, reputable, non profit source of information regarding Bermuda grass / Vegetation, our local climate and the unprecedented winter storm we just had.
It's not unusual for Bermuda grass to remain dormant well into April. Last winter was mild but in mid-November 2018 we got an early hard freeze and there was very little green for 5 months. Yearly articles written by the state Ag specialists always recommend to wait until it is actively growing before feeding (with mainly nitrogen, very little P) otherwise you'll just encourage the weeds. The snow covering the lawn actually provided beneficial insulation; if it was 10 deg 2 nights in a row with no snow cover the grass roots would have been severely damaged.
Mowing is useful to remove weed seedheads. I got a new house with Bermuda (Tifway) lawn 7 years ago and am still learning; if this contradicts your experience just disregard. Can't comment on weeds, sorry.
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Old 03-10-2021, 05:15 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,970 posts, read 4,328,491 times
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My St. Agustine and roses are coming back and we are north of the airport. We did lose a ton of other plan through.
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