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Old 04-20-2019, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Ashland, Oregon
814 posts, read 581,086 times
Reputation: 2587

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I am currently looking into moving to Palm Springs in a year or two. I'm looking at both condo's and manufactured homes and wondering about the pro's and con's of both.

If you pay a monthly space rent on a manufactured, do you pay property taxes on top of that, or is it like renting an apartment where the property taxes are included?

It looks to me like if you purchase a condo, you pay HOA fees in addition to property tax and the amounts could end up being the same.

Brand new MH's going up can be gorgeous and have all the trimmings. Condo's in my price range (under $300k) usually require some work and can be dated.

The idea of real desert hot springs in the compound is very appealing but don't know of any that aren't resorts. Am I missing something?

Everyone tells me that if I move from Oregon to California the taxes will kill me. My income is based on social security, a pension and a 401k which should have a few hundred grand (I hope). This year Uncle Sam took us for $8k, which is the most we ever paid. Much of it was a "claw-back" of the monthly subsidy the state of Oregon gives me. It has to be paid back but we don't have the eight grand so will go on a payment plan. Ironic that the monthly payments equal what we'd have paid out on a monthly basis anyway. Talk about shoveling $h!t against the tide...

I've been to Palm Springs a few times but don't know much about specific neighborhoods or areas outside of town.

Thoughts? Suggestions? Ideas?
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Old 04-20-2019, 03:51 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA 94122
276 posts, read 221,838 times
Reputation: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExNooYawk2 View Post
I am currently looking into moving to Palm Springs in a year or two. I'm looking at both condo's and manufactured homes and wondering about the pro's and con's of both.

If you pay a monthly space rent on a manufactured, do you pay property taxes on top of that, or is it like renting an apartment where the property taxes are included?

It looks to me like if you purchase a condo, you pay HOA fees in addition to property tax and the amounts could end up being the same.

Brand new MH's going up can be gorgeous and have all the trimmings. Condo's in my price range (under $300k) usually require some work and can be dated.

The idea of real desert hot springs in the compound is very appealing but don't know of any that aren't resorts. Am I missing something?

Everyone tells me that if I move from Oregon to California the taxes will kill me. My income is based on social security, a pension and a 401k which should have a few hundred grand (I hope). This year Uncle Sam took us for $8k, which is the most we ever paid. Much of it was a "claw-back" of the monthly subsidy the state of Oregon gives me. It has to be paid back but we don't have the eight grand so will go on a payment plan. Ironic that the monthly payments equal what we'd have paid out on a monthly basis anyway. Talk about shoveling $h!t against the tide...

I've been to Palm Springs a few times but don't know much about specific neighborhoods or areas outside of town.

Thoughts? Suggestions? Ideas?
What attracts you to PS? When did you visit? Summers there are excruciatingly HOT. Also it can get dusty.

Generally, the space rent fees in a mobile park cover the owner's expenses including their taxes, you don't own, except the structure.

Condos can be FS, you own the land and pay taxes, or Leasehold, you likely have to pay taxes too. This in in addition to the HOA.

So, a SFH is usually pretty competitive, especially if you stick to the outer areas where you could find a lower price, an acre or more of land too. But the heat and the dust...Arghhh.
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Old 04-23-2019, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Ashland, Oregon
814 posts, read 581,086 times
Reputation: 2587
My last visit to PS was about five years ago in March. I love the dry desert weather in the winter but am leery of summers. Heat and humidity are unbearable to me but hot and dry doesn't seem so bad. Except that it is. So, there is a lot fo think about.
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Old 04-30-2019, 02:16 PM
 
1,262 posts, read 1,301,146 times
Reputation: 2179
I'm planning on buying a manufactured home myself, but I am hoping to put it in a park where the residents own the land. (Google "ROC" to learn more about that).

If I can't find one of those communities for 55+ then I'm going to very carefully select a community that is 4 or 5 star rated and has a relatively low space rent (below $600/month).

Single family homes are the best housing investment. They will usually appreciate as long as the location location location is good. Condos are next up as an investment, but I got burned on my last purchase in 2006 when the real estate market died in 2008. Last is manufactured homes. The nice thing is you can buy one used at great bargains, although some command prices in excess of 200,000 even used, because of their location. More commonly manufactured home depreciate rather than appreciate, but location is a very big factor. For example, in the Pacific Northwest housing it at such a premium that people there are starting to take a look at manufactured homes just to put some kind of roof over their heads.

Mine will be about $75,000 new, plus transportation beyond 100 miles, and also site prep. I don't care about appreciation because I don't expect to live more than 10 additional years (based on my DR's assessment of my chronic illness), I have no children, and my wife is recently deceased.

The last thing I's like to mention to you is if you build/buy a manufactured home new, concentrate on things you don't see, but will make you home better. For instance, have your home built to energy star standards. Even if you don't get the certification, your home will be cooler in Summer and warmer in Winter. Go for the upgrade to plywood subflooring rather than MDF. Decrease the spacing between studs if it is greater than 16" on center. Try to have your home sited as low as possible on the land (this will most likely require shallow excavation) so as to eliminate steps. Increase the size of the lumber and decrease the spacing for the floor joists, so you have a very solid stable floor.

Good luck.
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Old 04-30-2019, 02:36 PM
 
18,172 posts, read 16,389,030 times
Reputation: 9328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaconowner View Post
I'm planning on buying a manufactured home myself, but I am hoping to put it in a park where the residents own the land. (Google "ROC" to learn more about that).

If I can't find one of those communities for 55+ then I'm going to very carefully select a community that is 4 or 5 star rated and has a relatively low space rent (below $600/month).

Single family homes are the best housing investment. They will usually appreciate as long as the location location location is good. Condos are next up as an investment, but I got burned on my last purchase in 2006 when the real estate market died in 2008. Last is manufactured homes. The nice thing is you can buy one used at great bargains, although some command prices in excess of 200,000 even used, because of their location. More commonly manufactured home depreciate rather than appreciate, but location is a very big factor. For example, in the Pacific Northwest housing it at such a premium that people there are starting to take a look at manufactured homes just to put some kind of roof over their heads.

Mine will be about $75,000 new, plus transportation beyond 100 miles, and also site prep. I don't care about appreciation because I don't expect to live more than 10 additional years (based on my DR's assessment of my chronic illness), I have no children, and my wife is recently deceased.

The last thing I's like to mention to you is if you build/buy a manufactured home new, concentrate on things you don't see, but will make you home better. For instance, have your home built to energy star standards. Even if you don't get the certification, your home will be cooler in Summer and warmer in Winter. Go for the upgrade to plywood subflooring rather than MDF. Decrease the spacing between studs if it is greater than 16" on center. Try to have your home sited as low as possible on the land (this will most likely require shallow excavation) so as to eliminate steps. Increase the size of the lumber and decrease the spacing for the floor joists, so you have a very solid stable floor.

Good luck.
Good points
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Old 08-19-2020, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Ashland, Oregon
814 posts, read 581,086 times
Reputation: 2587
Thanks for those thoughtful replies.

Nothing concrete has been decided yet but if I do head to Palm Springs, it would be nice to build my own MFH the way I'd want. That's probably not the most cost effective plan but some things will balance out cost-wise which I'll have to figure.

The PNW is great but so darn expensive. My kids all live around here so maybe we can build something with an annex for moi otherwise a move to a less costly area will be in the cards.

My favorite place as of now is Caliente Springs in PS. We stayed there in an RV a few years ago and it was delightful.
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