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Old 08-30-2016, 06:22 PM
 
3 posts, read 5,425 times
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LA's gentrification is pushing its low lifes out to Lancaster/Palmdale area. I can see San Diego's neighborhoods rising fast in land appreciation so my question is if Ex-San Diegans are being pushed out to Arizona since it's two hours closer than LA is to Phoenix?

Even the nice areas of the Inland Empire start from the half million and up.
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Old 08-30-2016, 06:51 PM
 
7,461 posts, read 5,258,760 times
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I'm sure there are some people who head to Arizona (although I hear of more people moving to Idaho from San Diego than Phoenix), but there are places closer to San Diego where you can still find lower housing costs.

It's possible to still buy a home in the far eastern reaches of San Diego county in a place like Campo or Boulevard for well under $300,000. Like this one: 29823 Widgeon Rd, Campo, CA 91906 | MLS #160047157 | Zillow There are two bedroom apartments and even some houses out there that rent for $700 a month. That's about an hour from downtown San Diego, depending on traffic.

But, if you're truly destitute, you head out to Slab City in Imperial County. You can live there for free for as long as you can take the heat.

(That said, I've seen really nice new home developments in Brawley in Imperial County where new homes are selling for around $250,000, so no need to go all the way to Phoenix for cheaper prices.)

If you don't want to be that far out and have some funds (i.e. not totally destitute), you can still find lower rents and home prices in closer in areas of San Diego County. Places like Lakeside, Lemon Grove, Spring Valley, La Mesa and El Cajon. Or, you can head to the South Bay to places like Chula Vista, Otay Mesa, Barrio Logan, or National City where rents and homes are still much cheaper than north county. There are some very nice neighborhoods in many of these areas (some not so nice too, but prices will be even lower there if you're not picky about neighborhood). There are still pockets of affordability in the Northern parts of San Diego, like Vista, San Marcos, Escondido.

And, there's always Temecula and Murietta too.

There's also always the option to live in Mexico and commute to San Diego. Some people do that.

Bottom line is: there are still plenty of less expensive options in San Diego County. But you do have to be open-minded and willing to make some compromises to take advantage of them.

If you're looking for a 3500 square foot home in mint condition built in the last 5 years on an acre lot in a "top" school district that's near the beach, a short drive from work, and also walkable to stores and restaurants for under $300,000 here, you're probably going to be looking for a long time.

Last edited by RosieSD; 08-30-2016 at 07:01 PM..
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Old 08-31-2016, 02:21 PM
 
2,540 posts, read 2,199,018 times
Reputation: 6857
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
I'm sure there are some people who head to Arizona (although I hear of more people moving to Idaho from San Diego than Phoenix), but there are places closer to San Diego where you can still find lower housing costs.

It's possible to still buy a home in the far eastern reaches of San Diego county in a place like Campo or Boulevard for well under $300,000. Like this one: 29823 Widgeon Rd, Campo, CA 91906 | MLS #160047157 | Zillow There are two bedroom apartments and even some houses out there that rent for $700 a month. That's about an hour from downtown San Diego, depending on traffic.

But, if you're truly destitute, you head out to Slab City in Imperial County. You can live there for free for as long as you can take the heat.

(That said, I've seen really nice new home developments in Brawley in Imperial County where new homes are selling for around $250,000, so no need to go all the way to Phoenix for cheaper prices.)

If you don't want to be that far out and have some funds (i.e. not totally destitute), you can still find lower rents and home prices in closer in areas of San Diego County. Places like Lakeside, Lemon Grove, Spring Valley, La Mesa and El Cajon. Or, you can head to the South Bay to places like Chula Vista, Otay Mesa, Barrio Logan, or National City where rents and homes are still much cheaper than north county. There are some very nice neighborhoods in many of these areas (some not so nice too, but prices will be even lower there if you're not picky about neighborhood). There are still pockets of affordability in the Northern parts of San Diego, like Vista, San Marcos, Escondido.

And, there's always Temecula and Murietta too.

There's also always the option to live in Mexico and commute to San Diego. Some people do that.

Bottom line is: there are still plenty of less expensive options in San Diego County. But you do have to be open-minded and willing to make some compromises to take advantage of them.

If you're looking for a 3500 square foot home in mint condition built in the last 5 years on an acre lot in a "top" school district that's near the beach, a short drive from work, and also walkable to stores and restaurants for under $300,000 here, you're probably going to be looking for a long time.
This is a question asked almost weekly by people looking to move here from other parts of the country.

Those type of homes exist, but you have to add a 2 to the price.
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Old 08-31-2016, 04:20 PM
 
7,461 posts, read 5,258,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axxlrod View Post
This is a question asked almost weekly by people looking to move here from other parts of the country.

Those type of homes exist, but you have to add a 2 to the price.
Yep. On the other hand, if you're open to a 1000 square foot fixer in a less desirable neighborhood, you can still find homes in San Diego County for under $500,000.

I drove past this one in Imperial Beach today -- it's in a decent neighborhood and you could easily walk or bike to the beach from it. Only $465,000:

1022 Holly Ave, Imperial Beach, CA 91932 | MLS #160044017 | Zillow

You'd probably have to put up with some helicopter noise from the IB naval air station which is a half block to the south. And from the pictures, it is definitely going to require some work and updating. But, any single family home in San Diego county under $500,000 is probably going to require some sort of compromise.

Last edited by RosieSD; 08-31-2016 at 04:34 PM..
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Old 08-31-2016, 11:15 PM
 
Location: San Diego A.K.A "D.A.Y.G.O City"
1,992 posts, read 4,004,254 times
Reputation: 2718
The amount of money people are willing to pay for a 1200 sq ft **** box in San Diego's worst neighborhoods is just mind boggling to me. Just like in L.A. The amount of compromises that so many people are willing to make just to live here is insane!

Why would anybody want to pay $300,000 or slightly less than that for a home way out in the middle of nowhere? Like the Imperial Valley or Brawly? Might as well just move to Phoenix, Vegas, or Albuquerque where at least you have city amenities such as shopping, movie theaters, places to eat, and entertainment options close by. What doesn't make any sense for anyone in their right mind to move out to the booneys and still pay a lot of $$$ for a house is that they can probably find even better homes with more square footage compared to most rural and remote areas of CA. It's simply not worth it.

California's biggest cities urban areas are experiencing rapid gentrification, but this is going on elsewhere in most other major cities across the country as well, so it's not unique to CA, but we are experiencing it at a much faster rate because both L.A. and SD are destination cities and developers run this town.

As more and more idiot hipsters and yuppies keep buying up those dinky bungalows or craftsman homes for 500,000 and up in a semi-urban area like North Park that's cool in all, but not urban heavy like most SF neighborhoods, the poor minorities will basically all be pushed out eventually, and then once the area cleans up enough with more White people moving in, then landlords of apartment buildings near by will simply convert them to condo's and kick all the poor out of the complex that used to pay say $1000 a month in rent, rebrand the apartments and call it something like "The Boulevard Apartment Homes" to attract yuppies thinking that they are "homes" when reality they're still just apartments But the name change softens its image, attracting intellectual types with a hint of snobbery and try to trick them into thinking that they are real condo's but are still apts with a fresh coat of paint, new windows, and nicer landscaping. Cha-Ching$$$ the greed is in, and now those units cost $2,000 a month in rent. The neighborhood gentrification is complete. No more poor Black and Brown folks to make the area scary anymore.

I really don't know where all the poor are going to go or are moving to. But the direction definitely points eastward.

CA is turning into the wealthy upper middle class (Haves), and the servant class (Poor-Have Nots). There's going to be no one in between anymore to be able to sustain the economy in cities like SD, L.A. and S.F. if this continues, because the extremely high cost for housing and rent makes it impossible for most folks to even save, and or move up the economic ladder that are in the lower class threshold. The less money you have, the harder it is to save, and the longer it will take you, so really it doesn't justify the poor living in SD or L.A. for that matter because it will take way to long for most families to even come up for a down payment. By the time they do, home prices will again rise to exponential numbers, thus the never ending cycle continues.



The unaffordability means a lot of turnover at fast food, retail work, and even jobs that require some skills that don't pay enough to live here like teachers, and welders that even with the good pay they receive, is still not even close to being able to buy a new home here and that is shocking if you think about it. So basically only people that are in reach of a home, are professionals, or are in high end management positions and make close to $100,000 a year are the ones that are able to afford that $600,000 house.


Here are some links, this one is just crazy. So if you put only 10 percent down ( most people do) for a $589,900 home which will get you a decent small house in say the college area, you need to make $132,466 a year!! San Diego is actually more expensive to live in and to buy a home in than NYC and L.A. once you factor in the lower wages here, and the amount of money you need to qualify for a mortgage.

The salary you must earn to buy a home in 27 metros


This article is a couple of years old, but it gives you an idea how much one has to make to afford close to a $500,000 home. Which is only $5,000 off from the current median price for a home in SD as in August.

The salary you need to afford a median home in San Diego. | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com

For someone to afford just the median price for a $483,000 home in SD, you need to make at least $98,534 a year! That's just the average. Most homes in SD now are way over $500,000 mark. In average suburban SD neighborhoods that are of older stock like in San Carlos, prices for homes there are at least $650,000-900,000!!! That is La Jolla esq pricing circa 2005! Might as well pay a 1.5 mill for a condo near the beach.

And we wonder why the homeless population has skyrocketed.



It's unbelievable, SD that is.

Last edited by sdlife619; 08-31-2016 at 11:32 PM..
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Old 09-01-2016, 06:49 AM
 
8,475 posts, read 27,254,541 times
Reputation: 4719
A lot of people priced out of SD move to the inland empire too, Murietta and Temecula in particular. SD doesn't have that large working-class population to fill up a place like Victor Valley or Palmdale. Most of the people out there have jobs in greater LA and have to commute over the passes for work, or they need to be close to Edwards AFB or other military bases. SD doesn't have the jobs to commute to, it's cheap enough for those folks who work on a navy base to just live in Chula Vista or San Ysidro.
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Old 09-01-2016, 09:20 AM
 
Location: San Diego
39,662 posts, read 35,493,150 times
Reputation: 23966
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdlife619 View Post
The amount of money people are willing to pay for a 1200 sq ft **** box in San Diego's worst neighborhoods is just mind boggling to me. Just like in L.A. The amount of compromises that so many people are willing to make just to live here is insane!

Why would anybody want to pay $300,000 or slightly less than that for a home way out in the middle of nowhere? Like the Imperial Valley or Brawly? Might as well just move to Phoenix, Vegas, or Albuquerque where at least you have city amenities such as shopping, movie theaters, places to eat, and entertainment options close by. What doesn't make any sense for anyone in their right mind to move out to the booneys and still pay a lot of $$$ for a house is that they can probably find even better homes with more square footage compared to most rural and remote areas of CA. It's simply not worth it.

California's biggest cities urban areas are experiencing rapid gentrification, but this is going on elsewhere in most other major cities across the country as well, so it's not unique to CA, but we are experiencing it at a much faster rate because both L.A. and SD are destination cities and developers run this town.

As more and more idiot hipsters and yuppies keep buying up those dinky bungalows or craftsman homes for 500,000 and up in a semi-urban area like North Park that's cool in all, but not urban heavy like most SF neighborhoods, the poor minorities will basically all be pushed out eventually, and then once the area cleans up enough with more White people moving in, then landlords of apartment buildings near by will simply convert them to condo's and kick all the poor out of the complex that used to pay say $1000 a month in rent, rebrand the apartments and call it something like "The Boulevard Apartment Homes" to attract yuppies thinking that they are "homes" when reality they're still just apartments But the name change softens its image, attracting intellectual types with a hint of snobbery and try to trick them into thinking that they are real condo's but are still apts with a fresh coat of paint, new windows, and nicer landscaping. Cha-Ching$$$ the greed is in, and now those units cost $2,000 a month in rent. The neighborhood gentrification is complete. No more poor Black and Brown folks to make the area scary anymore.

I really don't know where all the poor are going to go or are moving to. But the direction definitely points eastward.

CA is turning into the wealthy upper middle class (Haves), and the servant class (Poor-Have Nots). There's going to be no one in between anymore to be able to sustain the economy in cities like SD, L.A. and S.F. if this continues, because the extremely high cost for housing and rent makes it impossible for most folks to even save, and or move up the economic ladder that are in the lower class threshold. The less money you have, the harder it is to save, and the longer it will take you, so really it doesn't justify the poor living in SD or L.A. for that matter because it will take way to long for most families to even come up for a down payment. By the time they do, home prices will again rise to exponential numbers, thus the never ending cycle continues.



The unaffordability means a lot of turnover at fast food, retail work, and even jobs that require some skills that don't pay enough to live here like teachers, and welders that even with the good pay they receive, is still not even close to being able to buy a new home here and that is shocking if you think about it. So basically only people that are in reach of a home, are professionals, or are in high end management positions and make close to $100,000 a year are the ones that are able to afford that $600,000 house.


Here are some links, this one is just crazy. So if you put only 10 percent down ( most people do) for a $589,900 home which will get you a decent small house in say the college area, you need to make $132,466 a year!! San Diego is actually more expensive to live in and to buy a home in than NYC and L.A. once you factor in the lower wages here, and the amount of money you need to qualify for a mortgage.

The salary you must earn to buy a home in 27 metros


This article is a couple of years old, but it gives you an idea how much one has to make to afford close to a $500,000 home. Which is only $5,000 off from the current median price for a home in SD as in August.

The salary you need to afford a median home in San Diego. | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com

For someone to afford just the median price for a $483,000 home in SD, you need to make at least $98,534 a year! That's just the average. Most homes in SD now are way over $500,000 mark. In average suburban SD neighborhoods that are of older stock like in San Carlos, prices for homes there are at least $650,000-900,000!!! That is La Jolla esq pricing circa 2005! Might as well pay a 1.5 mill for a condo near the beach.

And we wonder why the homeless population has skyrocketed.



It's unbelievable, SD that is.
Minus the racist rant part that is a fairly accurate assessment. I do believe a lot of who is buying up these properties are foreign investors and they rent them or let them sit idle. There are a lot of cash transactions and that's hard to compete with.

People are slowly starting to realize they aren't entitled to live wherever they want.
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Old 09-01-2016, 09:20 AM
 
321 posts, read 259,008 times
Reputation: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by I Love OC View Post
LA's gentrification is pushing its low lifes out to Lancaster/Palmdale area.
People who get priced out of an area aren't low lifes. They're just folks struggling income wise and see better opportunity elsewhere.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdlife619 View Post
As more and more idiot hipsters and yuppies keep buying up those dinky bungalows or craftsman homes for 500,000 and up in a semi-urban area like North Park...
Similarly, people who buy in NP aren't idiots although I concede they may be young urban professionals.

In both cases folks are trying to do what's best for them with the resources they have.


In terms of migration, I haven't seen any study specific to san diego, but at the state level folks are moving to other western states + texas.

California's high housing costs drive out poor, middle-income workers - LA Times

I'd be surprised if it were any different in SD (assuming you exclude military moves).
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Old 09-01-2016, 09:34 AM
 
Location: San Diego
39,662 posts, read 35,493,150 times
Reputation: 23966
Quote:
Originally Posted by snpdragr View Post
People who get priced out of an area aren't low lifes. They're just folks struggling income wise and see better opportunity elsewhere.




Similarly, people who buy in NP aren't idiots although I concede they may be young urban professionals.

In both cases folks are trying to do what's best for them with the resources they have.


In terms of migration, I haven't seen any study specific to san diego, but at the state level folks are moving to other western states + texas.

California's high housing costs drive out poor, middle-income workers - LA Times

I'd be surprised if it were any different in SD (assuming you exclude military moves).
Yep, I would hardly call this group "losers". According to the Census data from 2007 to 2013, one of the largest groups of workers leaving California was those who had more than a high school diploma but less than a bachelor's degree.

Sounds to me like the ones left being able to afford to buy here fall under the category "successful" aka "winners". Being one of the losers(myself) that put themselves through school to get a degree, it was one of the hardest times of my life. Work all day and go to school at night is not easy.
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Old 09-01-2016, 09:59 AM
 
Location: San Diego
10 posts, read 9,734 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
f you're looking for a 3500 square foot home in mint condition built in the last 5 years on an acre lot in a "top" school district that's near the beach, a short drive from work, and also walkable to stores and restaurants for under $300,000 here, you're probably going to be looking for a long time.
That is a unicorn. :-)
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