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Old 07-14-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Northern Colorado
4,932 posts, read 12,755,796 times
Reputation: 1364

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Interesting input. I think the Bay Area is also becoming more desirable than the LA Area because LA is becoming overcrowded.

I would also say the Bay Area shares these features:

Strong downtowns
Very liberal
Lots of college educated residents and wealthy residents
Dense suburban homes
Cool and overcast weather (depending how close to the Bay you are)
Less Wal-Marts in the area
Large population of Asians (e.g. Chinatown, Japantown, etc...)

Which is also similar to the traits of the Central Coast:

Strong downtowns
Very liberal
Lots of college educated residents and wealthy residents
Cool and overcast weather
Less Wal-Marts in the area
Many rural areas and hiking trails
Lots of young people

Last edited by the city; 07-14-2011 at 03:55 PM..
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:56 PM
 
3,463 posts, read 5,257,554 times
Reputation: 3200
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Interesting input. I think the Bay Area is also becoming more desirable than the LA Area because LA is becoming overcrowded.

I would also say the Bay Area shares these features:

Strong downtowns
Very liberal
Lots of college educated residents and wealthy residents
Dense suburban homes
Cool and overcast weather (depending how close to the Bay you are)
Less Wal-Marts in the area
Large population of Asians (e.g. Chinatown, Japantown, etc...)

Which is also similar to the traits of the Central Coast:

Strong downtowns
Very liberal
Lots of college educated residents and wealthy residents
Cool and overcast weather
Less Wal-Marts in the area
Many rural areas and hiking trails
Lots of young people
I would add the rural areas and hiking trails to the Bay Area list too. We have TONS of outdoor nature areas, more than almost any urban metropolis in the world, and many different types of natural habitats that make it varied and interesting. Along the coast, we have everything from redwoods in some of the mountains to chaparral along the hills, cliffs and sandy beaches both. Inland, we have oak and golden grasslands. There are tons of reservoirs for outdoor recreation, and lots of trails for hiking and biking.

Are there really lots of young people on the Central Coast? It seems rather the opposite to me, except for college towns. Am I wrong?

There are still too many Wal-Marts in the Bay Area. Wal-Mart's website shows 20 locations within the Bay Area. There are none from SF down to the peninsula. They are all suburban locations, but there are a lot of them.

I would say most of the particular cities on the OP's particular list would not fall into the cool/foggy category (Daly City being a glaring exception of miserable hell). Places like Santa Clara, San Jose, Concord, etc are sunnier than 90 percent of the country. Even if parts of LA may be sunnier than 99 percent of the country, and SoCal transplants complain about us, we're not exactly London here. San Jose claims to get 300 days of sun per year.

Is the central coast also liberal? I thought it was pretty mixed. I'd say the Bay ARea is generally very liberal, but the more suburban you get, the less liberal it gets. I'd say LA is also very liberal. Heck, almost all of urban California and Urban America is liberal.

The Bay Area is pretty unique in how many cool little downtowns we have in all the cities that started here long ago. LA doesn't have nearly as many walkable neighborhoods, and it's quite different here than, say, Manhattan, where all the neighborhoods are urban. Here, we have a mix of urban, suburban, and small town downtowns. I really love that. There's really a place for everyone.

Even outside of Japantown and Chinatown in SF, there are tons of Asian areas all over the Bay Area, with many markets catering to those communities. It's pretty cool.

Whether you consider the suburbs here dense is a matter of perspective. Most of the suburbs built before the 1980s are identical across the state, but perhaps more dense than, say, in the South. But they're still largely single family homes with fenced yards and a 2-car garage. Areas like Daly City, again, are definitely denser, even though they're old too. I wouldn't perceive Bay Area suburbs to be particularly dense by my definition.
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Old 07-14-2011, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Northern Colorado
4,932 posts, read 12,755,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
I would add the rural areas and hiking trails to the Bay Area list too. We have TONS of outdoor nature areas, more than almost any urban metropolis in the world, and many different types of natural habitats that make it varied and interesting. Along the coast, we have everything from redwoods in some of the mountains to chaparral along the hills, cliffs and sandy beaches both. Inland, we have oak and golden grasslands. There are tons of reservoirs for outdoor recreation, and lots of trails for hiking and biking.

Are there really lots of young people on the Central Coast? It seems rather the opposite to me, except for college towns. Am I wrong?

There are still too many Wal-Marts in the Bay Area. Wal-Mart's website shows 20 locations within the Bay Area. There are none from SF down to the peninsula. They are all suburban locations, but there are a lot of them.

I would say most of the particular cities on the OP's particular list would not fall into the cool/foggy category (Daly City being a glaring exception of miserable hell). Places like Santa Clara, San Jose, Concord, etc are sunnier than 90 percent of the country. Even if parts of LA may be sunnier than 99 percent of the country, and SoCal transplants complain about us, we're not exactly London here. San Jose claims to get 300 days of sun per year.

Is the central coast also liberal? I thought it was pretty mixed. I'd say the Bay ARea is generally very liberal, but the more suburban you get, the less liberal it gets. I'd say LA is also very liberal. Heck, almost all of urban California and Urban America is liberal.

The Bay Area is pretty unique in how many cool little downtowns we have in all the cities that started here long ago. LA doesn't have nearly as many walkable neighborhoods, and it's quite different here than, say, Manhattan, where all the neighborhoods are urban. Here, we have a mix of urban, suburban, and small town downtowns. I really love that. There's really a place for everyone.

Even outside of Japantown and Chinatown in SF, there are tons of Asian areas all over the Bay Area, with many markets catering to those communities. It's pretty cool.

Whether you consider the suburbs here dense is a matter of perspective. Most of the suburbs built before the 1980s are identical across the state, but perhaps more dense than, say, in the South. But they're still largely single family homes with fenced yards and a 2-car garage. Areas like Daly City, again, are definitely denser, even though they're old too. I wouldn't perceive Bay Area suburbs to be particularly dense by my definition.
The majority of Central Coast (Monterey to Santa Barbara county) is now mostly liberal. And yeah I guess for the most part the central coast is a mix with families, young people, and retirees.

I still feel the Bay Area has less Wal-Marts than most areas.

I guess the weather is only cool and foggy near the Bay.
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Old 07-15-2011, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,288 posts, read 11,774,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I would also say the Bay Area shares these features:
<.....>
Cool and overcast weather (depending how close to the Bay you are)
<....>
Which is also similar to the traits of the Central Coast:

Cool and overcast weather
If by Central Coast you mean Santa Barbara, isnt' that a much more moderate climate than us?
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Old 07-15-2011, 12:20 PM
 
12,823 posts, read 24,390,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
If by Central Coast you mean Santa Barbara, isnt' that a much more moderate climate than us?
SB gets lots of "dry season" overcast (including overcast capable of producing drizzle) as well as some bouts of the type of ground level marine stratus typical of the NorCal ocean side. The main difference is that the air temperature is a bit warmer than up here - during a "fog siege" SB will be about 62 or 63 as opposed to 58 or 59 during the day.

One little known thing is that in SoCal the "fog season" last longer than in NorCal. This is of course due to the greater portion of the year SoCal is in the lee of the northern part of the Pacific High vs NorCal. Being in the lee of the northern part of the High is the precondition for the coastal stratus / on shore flow.

Because SB is less protected from the Westerly by the Channel Islands than other SoCal areas, it does not experience the "burn off to the beach" effect seen in the LA beach cities.
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Old 07-15-2011, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Antioch, CA is where that nut that kidnapped Jaycee Dugard lived and held her captive.
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Old 07-15-2011, 08:12 PM
 
Location: The Bay
6,914 posts, read 14,744,821 times
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San Mateo isn't as uniformly "nice" as people are saying. Shoreview isn't nice and North Central can be somewhat iffy... neither are the ghetto per say but they're definitely not what most people would have in mind if they went off of the recommendations on this thread and decided to rent/buy over there thinking that all of San Mateo was nice.

There are definitely parts of Santa Clara that are not nice... the Main St area is one of them.
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Old 07-16-2011, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Northern Colorado
4,932 posts, read 12,755,796 times
Reputation: 1364
Well I like the Bay Area. I think of San Luis Obispo is similar to the Bay Area. All though, San Luis Obispo bugs me because it lacks the population of the Bay Area. SLO is a town that takes forever to get chains that we should have gotten years ago. We got Best Buy and some others in the 90s, Costco in 2006, Chipotle in 2010, Olive Garden this year, and were still waiting on Macy's which will be 2-3 years away.
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Old 07-16-2011, 02:59 AM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
1,482 posts, read 5,172,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mini_cute View Post
Antioch, CA is where that nut that kidnapped Jaycee Dugard lived and held her captive.
And his relatives live in Concord and sell ravioli out of their house.
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Old 07-16-2011, 07:01 PM
 
245 posts, read 607,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Yes this is the popular perception but I spent the whole day out in Concord today along Clayton Road and it seems pretty idyllic to me. Actually quite beautiful the closer you get to Clayton, especially right below Mt Diablo.
Clayton = nice

Concord = cess pool
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