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Old 05-23-2008, 09:34 PM
 
3 posts, read 7,722 times
Reputation: 10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
But the Bay Area is full of white upper middle class suburbs too, what's the difference btwn a white upper middle class suburb here and one on Long Island, NY? The Bay Area is not fundamentally unique as people think it is, most major metropolitan areas have a decent level of diversity and some are just as diverse if not more diverse than the Bay Area. Sacramento is more ethnically diverse than SF.
Sacramento is really more diverse than SF? I lived in both places and don't believe that to be true. I think SF is way more diverse.
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Old 05-24-2008, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Northern California
979 posts, read 2,083,092 times
Reputation: 765
I currently live in SF but I was born and raised in Sac. I have to agree that Sac is more ethnically diverse. SF has a strong asian community, hispanic community and some russians, but sacramento has a bit of everything.
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Old 05-27-2008, 03:42 PM
 
6 posts, read 13,552 times
Reputation: 10
Default moved from the Bay area to....gasp!

My husband and I left the Bay area 7 yrs ago along with my 2 yr old. We lived all over the bay area from San Francisco to San Jose to Castro Valley and finally Novato before we moved to (are you sitting down) Charlotte NC - I was VERY worried about the the potential lack of diversity/tolerance (far from it)
I grew up in southern California and have/had most of my family there. Now my parents are here along with my brother and his wife.
The cost of living here allows you to have a life outside of working/commuting.
Owning property isn't a nightmare mortgage. We have the beautiful mountains, lakes, amazing beaches (3 hrs away)
So I can finally say I'm glad we took the plunge. Though I have to say if we could afford what we have here back in San Francisco we would be there. The cost just didn't make it possible for us!
Good luck to you and your family!
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:21 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
18,963 posts, read 32,437,457 times
Reputation: 13609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sactownkid916 View Post
Sacramento is really more diverse than SF? I lived in both places and don't believe that to be true. I think SF is way more diverse.
Look at the statistics and racial make up of the city, it's a lot more diverse and balanced than SF, which is mainly Asian or white.
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Old 05-28-2008, 08:37 AM
 
152 posts, read 876,108 times
Reputation: 105
Could someone tell me why this thread turned into a pissing contest about the relative diversities of SF and Sac? Who really has time to care about this negligible difference?
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Old 05-28-2008, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Land of the Free
6,550 posts, read 6,590,868 times
Reputation: 7380
Quote:
Originally Posted by elcapitan View Post
Could someone tell me why this thread turned into a pissing contest about the relative diversities of SF and Sac? Who really has time to care about this negligible difference?
I think the point is that people in SF are becoming provincial and uninformed, as evidenced by their everyone-in-the-suburbs-is-white-and-nerdy view of the world.
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Old 05-28-2008, 11:38 AM
 
4,127 posts, read 5,050,920 times
Reputation: 1621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taboo2 View Post
I am waying the pro's and con's of moving my children away frrom the area. We could have a much bigger house, and perhaps even in a safer neighborhood. Gas would likely be cheaper, as would food. Schools better? Perhaps.
They would lack the culture oppurtunity of interacting with other nationalities from EVERYWHERE and all the fun stuff we had growing up around here to do.

Great America
Bonfante Gardens
Discovery Museum
Safari West
Pier 39/Cable Cars/Presidio/Cliff House (Course the penny arcade has moved)
Marin Headlands
Marine World
Fairyland
SF Zoo
The Boardwalk
Half Moon Bay's Pumpkin Festival
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Coyote Point
Lindsay Museum
Tilden Park
Kennedy Park
and much much more.
Everything you listed is available in any metropolitan area. The question for you is whether or not the Bay Area is home.

Sure you can get a bigger house but the property taxes will be higher, and maintenance will be more. You may find things like flood, tornado, hurricane, and locust insurance makes earthquake and fire insurance look like a cakewalk. Though many armchair economists will argue, your standard of living will not rise overall by relocating. Some stuff will be cheaper and of better quality while other things will be more expensive and/or of lower quality. It's all a give and take thing. Where the cost of living is low, so are the wages. If you find a place with good wages and cheap real estate, there are always expenses you're not seeing. Many expenses are unique to a particular region and someone from another area wouldn't think of them because they've never heard of such.

Most of the people I've known from the area who leave come back within a year or two. The biggest complaint I hear is the weather. Most other places have seasons. In SF many people get upset when they get a day or two in the 90s or even triple digit temperatures. Imagine that for 4 solid months a year day AND night! That's where I come from. It can sometimes get freezing cold for a day or two in the winter. In the upper Midwest, for about 1/3 of the year, it's below freezing and for 2 or 3 months, sub-zero. I spent the 06-07 winter in Northwest Minnesota where the temp dropped to -38F. ( That's 50 degrees colder than your freezer btw) and it never got above zero (32 degrees below freezing) for two solid months. I'm told it was a comparatively mild winter.


You know the nice cool nights where you open the windows and enjoy a great sleep? In Houston (where I'm from) it MAY drop to as low as 80 tonight only because it's raining. A typical gulf coast thunderstorm will scare the average Californian (not an exaggeration). You'll either learn to deal with the heat and humidity or you'll learn to pay some summer cooling bills like you never dreamed possible. Texas is a huge state and like CA has different climates but the whole state has seasons. Up in Dallas-Ft. Worth. You get the joy of the hot and humid blast from the gulf in summer and the icy wind blowing down from Canada in winter. Fun Stuff!

In some ways, California is lacking. It has a lot to offer but contrary to popular belief, it doesn't have it all. You can't see the northern lights here. You can't kayak in the Bayou. There are a lot of things that are unique to any area and no place has it all. Every place has Amusement parks and museums. Weather has a huge affect on a person's state of mind. Probably more than anything else. The odds are that you'll move somewhere else and end up coming back with a couple hundred thousand less in equity than when you left because no matter how neato a new place may seem, you'll eventually get homesick. I'm actually in the same boat myself. All in all I like the Bay Area except for the weather. I stayed here for so many years because it was my wife's home. I made the best of a place that was never really right. Now that she's passed, my urge to go home is stronger than ever. Believe it or not, it's not museums or culture amusement parks of home that I miss but the warm summer rain and the sound of the warm gulf waters. Same thing will happen to you eventually and you'll want to go home.

As far as missing the cultural diversity so many San Franciscans like to brag about...Don't kid yourself. Unless you're moving to the upper Midwest or The top of New England, you're going to run smack into all sorts of cultural diversity. Even more so on the coasts. The East and Gulf coast port cities were worldwide shipping ports centuries before there was a USA. In fact, compared to where I'm from, where I now live, and the South and East Coasts, SF seems really white. Many San Franciscans seem to take great effort to point out all the differences in people by "celebrating diversity". It seems sort of elitist from my point of view. Anyhow, you will probably discover the rest of the US is a lot more racially and culturally diverse than you may be aware.
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Old 05-28-2008, 11:40 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
18,963 posts, read 32,437,457 times
Reputation: 13609
Quote:
Originally Posted by elcapitan View Post
Could someone tell me why this thread turned into a pissing contest about the relative diversities of SF and Sac? Who really has time to care about this negligible difference?
Yet you have time to write about it.......


Could you please tell me how this is a "pissing contest" when there are a total of 4 posts out of 25 about this? I just originally wanted to point out something people probably don't realize, that Sac is more ethnically diverse than SF. One person agreed, one didn't, and I just said look it up. THAT's ALL, hardly a pissing contest.
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Old 05-28-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: yeah
5,717 posts, read 16,296,078 times
Reputation: 2974
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
everyone-in-the-suburbs-is-white-and-nerdy
And most of those people move to San Francisco to then openly reject their old lifestyle.
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Old 05-28-2008, 02:05 PM
 
Location: THE USA
3,257 posts, read 6,110,859 times
Reputation: 1998
This was a super helpful post. I forgot all about weather. Even though I've spent summers in Houston/Austin and just about died... I've spent summers in Chicago and just about died... and I've spent summers in NYC and just about Died- ALL from the humidity in these places.. Yeesh. I spent winters in NY and Chi and froze my arse off. I've never seen a Texas winter.

I forgot we have such easy weather here. Mediterranean climate. Perhaps if we move it should be to Europe. I'm sorry. I'm spoiled.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe_Ryder View Post
Everything you listed is available in any metropolitan area. The question for you is whether or not the Bay Area is home.

Sure you can get a bigger house but the property taxes will be higher, and maintenance will be more. You may find things like flood, tornado, hurricane, and locust insurance makes earthquake and fire insurance look like a cakewalk. Though many armchair economists will argue, your standard of living will not rise overall by relocating. Some stuff will be cheaper and of better quality while other things will be more expensive and/or of lower quality. It's all a give and take thing. Where the cost of living is low, so are the wages. If you find a place with good wages and cheap real estate, there are always expenses you're not seeing. Many expenses are unique to a particular region and someone from another area wouldn't think of them because they've never heard of such.

Most of the people I've known from the area who leave come back within a year or two. The biggest complaint I hear is the weather. Most other places have seasons. In SF many people get upset when they get a day or two in the 90s or even triple digit temperatures. Imagine that for 4 solid months a year day AND night! That's where I come from. It can sometimes get freezing cold for a day or two in the winter. In the upper Midwest, for about 1/3 of the year, it's below freezing and for 2 or 3 months, sub-zero. I spent the 06-07 winter in Northwest Minnesota where the temp dropped to -38F. ( That's 50 degrees colder than your freezer btw) and it never got above zero (32 degrees below freezing) for two solid months. I'm told it was a comparatively mild winter.


You know the nice cool nights where you open the windows and enjoy a great sleep? In Houston (where I'm from) it MAY drop to as low as 80 tonight only because it's raining. A typical gulf coast thunderstorm will scare the average Californian (not an exaggeration). You'll either learn to deal with the heat and humidity or you'll learn to pay some summer cooling bills like you never dreamed possible. Texas is a huge state and like CA has different climates but the whole state has seasons. Up in Dallas-Ft. Worth. You get the joy of the hot and humid blast from the gulf in summer and the icy wind blowing down from Canada in winter. Fun Stuff!

In some ways, California is lacking. It has a lot to offer but contrary to popular belief, it doesn't have it all. You can't see the northern lights here. You can't kayak in the Bayou. There are a lot of things that are unique to any area and no place has it all. Every place has Amusement parks and museums. Weather has a huge affect on a person's state of mind. Probably more than anything else. The odds are that you'll move somewhere else and end up coming back with a couple hundred thousand less in equity than when you left because no matter how neato a new place may seem, you'll eventually get homesick. I'm actually in the same boat myself. All in all I like the Bay Area except for the weather. I stayed here for so many years because it was my wife's home. I made the best of a place that was never really right. Now that she's passed, my urge to go home is stronger than ever. Believe it or not, it's not museums or culture amusement parks of home that I miss but the warm summer rain and the sound of the warm gulf waters. Same thing will happen to you eventually and you'll want to go home.

As far as missing the cultural diversity so many San Franciscans like to brag about...Don't kid yourself. Unless you're moving to the upper Midwest or The top of New England, you're going to run smack into all sorts of cultural diversity. Even more so on the coasts. The East and Gulf coast port cities were worldwide shipping ports centuries before there was a USA. In fact, compared to where I'm from, where I now live, and the South and East Coasts, SF seems really white. Many San Franciscans seem to take great effort to point out all the differences in people by "celebrating diversity". It seems sort of elitist from my point of view. Anyhow, you will probably discover the rest of the US is a lot more racially and culturally diverse than you may be aware.
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