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Old 12-14-2018, 12:38 AM
 
15 posts, read 13,806 times
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My wife read your post GreatSantaFe. That did not help me
We noticed that there is a bunch of suitable houses to sale west of Santa Fe, on the other side of the 599 and north of Santa Fe, close to Tesuque. Are those suitable locations ?
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Old 12-14-2018, 12:53 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,252 posts, read 108,199,089 times
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Originally Posted by sdouble View Post
That's a great info, thanks.
We are actually not from the US. This is something new to us.
I'm more a city man but my wife is more country-oriented.
For some reason, she has in mind to buy a large house with 2+ acres and grow vegetable in Santa Fe to sell them at the farmers market.. I try to fight but... as usual.. you see. I'll surrender.
Well, there are plenty of properties with 1-2 acres in Santa Fe, but many of them don't have good soil for growing. You should look off of West Alameda Street, toward the south. It's more rural along there, especially off the east side of West Alameda, as it goes south from downtown. There are larger lots out there, a few horse properties, and some old farms.

Still, she would have to research how to get farming to work in this climate. Obviously, people do, but I don't know how they do it. He's, drip irrigation, but that doesn't explain everything.
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Old 12-14-2018, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Santa Fe, NM
974 posts, read 2,346,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdouble View Post
My wife read your post GreatSantaFe. That did not help me
We noticed that there is a bunch of suitable houses to sale west of Santa Fe, on the other side of the 599 and north of Santa Fe, close to Tesuque. Are those suitable locations ?
Unfortunately I have to say “it depends.” I’d focus on properties along, or close to, rivers. So that would include the Santa Fe River, the Rio Tesuque, Rio Pojoaque and Rio Nambe north of town, and a bit further out the Pecos River which serves the Pecos community about 40 minutes east of town. The Abiquiu area (Chama River) and communities of El Rito and Ojo Caliente also have good farmland, but again you’re talking about 45-60 minutes from Santa Fe. The La Cienega area, about 15 minutes south of town might be another area to look in.
A consideration north of town is that the State Engineer won’t permit new wells - it’s a part of the Aamodt settlement (too complicated to go into here), so you’d need to find properties with existing wells.
In short, there’s a lot to consider. Getting yourselves a good Realtor and having him/her guide you so you’re not spinning your wheels might be a good idea.
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Old 12-23-2018, 02:29 PM
 
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Where you go depends upon what you can spend. Know for the most part a custom build Vs a resale will cost at least 200 sq ft in Santa Fe area. There is a lot of farmers market. Eldorado which has lots 1.5-2.0 acres. Great location about 20 mins to downtown SF. Very convenient with a country feel. Most of Eldorado connected to the water company. I garden, and have bills average 100.00 monthly @ most annually. Lower winter higher summer. Gardening. Yes very doable. You need to adjust to the climate. Use shading covers if you don't have a tree nearby-which is more common than uncommon. Need lots of hardware cloth to keep gophers out, garden area needs to be fence. Or make raised beds with some sort of wooden screen material to keep the critters out. There isn't anything that resembles soil in the least here. It is dirt. You can cultivate it. Make a compost pile. Work with native soil and mix with other more soil type filler. I use 25% peat moss 25% bagged pre-made soil. I like it as it holds water. Good luck and definitely visit, and if possible spend some time here before moving.
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Old 12-23-2018, 04:08 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,252 posts, read 108,199,089 times
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Originally Posted by GreatSantaFe View Post
Unfortunately I have to say “it depends.” I’d focus on properties along, or close to, rivers. So that would include the Santa Fe River, the Rio Tesuque, Rio Pojoaque and Rio Nambe north of town, and a bit further out the Pecos River which serves the Pecos community about 40 minutes east of town. The Abiquiu area (Chama River) and communities of El Rito and Ojo Caliente also have good farmland, but again you’re talking about 45-60 minutes from Santa Fe. The La Cienega area, about 15 minutes south of town might be another area to look in.
A consideration north of town is that the State Engineer won’t permit new wells - it’s a part of the Aamodt settlement (too complicated to go into here), so you’d need to find properties with existing wells.
In short, there’s a lot to consider. Getting yourselves a good Realtor and having him/her guide you so you’re not spinning your wheels might be a good idea.
If you're talking north of SF, but within an easy-ish drive, I'd like to point out, that between Pojoaque and Nambe pueblos, there is fee-simple land that's farmable, traditionally has been farmed, has a well, some parcels even have irrigation-water (acequia) rights. There's also similar land on the west side of the highway: Cuyamungue, for example. These are areas that are more affordable than the villages of Tesuque and Nambe; not sure to what extent affordability is an issue for you, OP.

OK, I see you're not from the US. Just to clarify what I meant by "fee simple land"; it's a legal term that applies to most conventional private land parcels, but SF is surrounded by Indian reservations, which are federal land. Within the boundaries of some of them, there are parcels that are available for sale to non-Native people (like you ), that are like any other private land (so it's called "fee simple", to differentiate it from federal trust land, for example). So it's on the reservation, but it's available for private ownership. These parcels all have wells, AFAIK.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 12-23-2018 at 04:23 PM..
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Old 12-23-2018, 08:22 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
26,527 posts, read 51,840,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OK, I see you're not from the US. Just to clarify what I meant by "fee simple land"; it's a legal term that applies to most conventional private land parcels, but SF is surrounded by Indian reservations, which are federal land. Within the boundaries of some of them, there are parcels that are available for sale to non-Native people (like you ), that are like any other private land (so it's called "fee simple", to differentiate it from federal trust land, for example). So it's on the reservation, but it's available for private ownership. These parcels all have wells, AFAIK.
You are off track and babbling...

For those truly interested, this should be of interest: https://revenuedata.doi.gov/how-it-w...nd-regulations

One brief portion:

Quote:
Once out of trust, however, the land became subject to state and local taxation, the costs of which led thousands of acres of Native American land to pass out of Native American hands once the trust status was lifted. Furthermore, non-allotted lands were often declared “surplus land” by the federal government, which opened them to homesteaders, thereby accelerating the loss of Native American land to non-Native Americans.

The policy of allotment dramatically reduced the amount of land owned by tribes. In 1887, tribes held 138 million acres. Just forty-seven years later, in 1934, they owned 48 million acres. To stop the loss of Native American land, the federal government ended the allotment policy in 1934 and extended the trust period indefinitely. Today, allotments are still held in trust by the federal government for the beneficial Native American owner.

In addition to diminishing the total acreage owned, the allotment policy also left behind a checkerboard of land ownership on many reservations, with individual parcels of land sometimes owned by a tribe or tribes, Native American individuals, and non-Native Americans. As the original recipients of allotments died, their land was divided among their descendants, with each receiving only a fractional share of the whole. This division among multiple heirs is known as fractionation.
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Old 12-24-2018, 05:33 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,252 posts, read 108,199,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
You are off track and babbling...

For those truly interested, this should be of interest: https://revenuedata.doi.gov/how-it-w...nd-regulations

One brief portion:
I know all that, thanks. I was only pointing out, that they might find available land within Rez boundaries, just suggesting another place they could look. "Fee simple" is the legal term designating the status of those parcels. Sorry for the legalese.
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Old 12-25-2018, 01:18 AM
 
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Thanks for the support.
I just looked at zillow. There are not so many properties for sale in Pojoaque and Nambe. I found a couple of them though. It's true that the price there seems more reasonable than what I could see closer to Santa Fe city center. We have a budget of about 700 k. It could be extended if we find a very good deal though.
I would like to stick to the northern part of Santa Fe.
thanks again for your help... and merry Christmas to all.
J
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Old 12-25-2018, 11:27 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,252 posts, read 108,199,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdouble View Post
Thanks for the support.
I just looked at zillow. There are not so many properties for sale in Pojoaque and Nambe. I found a couple of them though. It's true that the price there seems more reasonable than what I could see closer to Santa Fe city center. We have a budget of about 700 k. It could be extended if we find a very good deal though.
I would like to stick to the northern part of Santa Fe.
thanks again for your help... and merry Christmas to all.
J
Good luck, and let us know where you end up! We love updates! Merry Xmas!
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