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Old 02-18-2012, 08:35 AM
 
17 posts, read 47,922 times
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I have been having trouble finding someone I can count on to take care of my pool when I am gone, and am starting to wonder if it will just be easier to close it down for 2-3 months when I am gone for the summer.
Though the water chemistry was never correct when I checked it myself, the biggest problem is that we have no pool cage (and our house style isn't really conducive to adding one). On windy days, I have skim out quite a few leaves. No big deal. However, a weekly visit from the pool company - especially during summer storm season won't cut it. (I am now having to replace a fairly new pump motor that burnt out due to clogged leaves).

Anyway, though I have ordered a leaf net, which will hopefully help, I'd prefer to just close it down while I am away. Anyone tried this? I would have more peace of mind and wouldnt mind some extra cleanup in the fall - unless I'd be returning to a cess pool. Thoughts?
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
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I don't understand how you would close your pool. Drain it completely? You can't find a single pool company that will do a weekly or bi weekly visit?
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:49 PM
 
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Up North people close their pools for the winter. It involves heavily shocking it with winterizing chemicals and covering it and protecting the filter and such from freezing. I don't know if that would work here. My thought is that with the extreme heat, the water under that cover would be a nice slime green by the time you got back.
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Old 02-18-2012, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Florida
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Never heard of "closing your pool"...you might inquire about draining it & having a pool cover installed but when you find out how expensive it is to have a pool cover made to fit, you'd be better off having a pool service instead...
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:21 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 3,352,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nphomeowner View Post
Up North people close their pools for the winter. It involves heavily shocking it with winterizing chemicals and covering it and protecting the filter and such from freezing. I don't know if that would work here. My thought is that with the extreme heat, the water under that cover would be a nice slime green by the time you got back.
This^

Pools up north can stay clear during winter with proper winterization. Due to the extreme cold- algae & bacteria won't bloom in the water in freezing temps. But even people up north don't "close" their pools & leave for months in the summer.

Here in Florida with pretty much year round warm weather, without regular maintainence, you will have a complete mess when you return!

Just put a leaf net over your pool & hire someone to come out for weekly maintainence.
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:35 PM
 
17 posts, read 47,922 times
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I was afraid that would be the case. My previous pool company didnt want to use a leaf net, because they thought it could get sucked into the skimmer(?), but that does sound like my only option. I'll look for someone else to manage things while I am gone. I guess that must be what they do with bank owned homes that sit vacant for months?
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Old 02-18-2012, 09:46 PM
 
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I would think you could do that, my brother did for many years. Of course, I have no idea what the pool was like when the summer was over. I can't imagine he would have done it if it were a problem. He treated it the same way they do up North. He emptied it about 2/3, added chemicals and covered it. Even if the pool is green when you open it, the chemicals clear it up quickly. The cost of the cover is probably offset by the savings on chemicals and electricity.

I would ask a pool service what people do. There are many (like my brother) who spent the summers up North. Plus, are the liability issues of leaving an open pool.

I think you can safely close it for the summer.
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Old 02-18-2012, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Wandering.
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Be very careful about draining a pool in FL, even part way. When the water table rises, especially if you are close to sea level, or during heavy rains, the shell can pop out of the ground (it becomes a boat hull).

I'd definitely get advice from a local pool company before leaving it drained for a long period.
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Old 02-18-2012, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
11,330 posts, read 10,098,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macyny View Post
Plus, are the liability issues of leaving an open pool.

.
I think this thread has gone over my head.

What liability issues would you have? Technically a pool is always open even if it is partly drained.
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Old 02-18-2012, 10:44 PM
 
17 posts, read 47,922 times
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Is there a reason your brother drained some of the water? Wouldn't the chemicals and cover give him the same result with all the water in the pool.
I am going to have some upgrades done on my pool, and the remodeler said that we may have to drain it, if we couldn't clean all the debris out of it when the work was done. He said that we could open the bottom drain, which would equalize the pressure to avoid any possibility of it popping out of the ground.
In any case, I wouldn't attempt to drain it to avoid summer maintenance. I was just hoping there was a procedure equivalent to northern winterizing.
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