U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Sarasota - Bradenton - Venice area
 [Register]
Sarasota - Bradenton - Venice area Manatee and Sarasota Counties
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-20-2020, 09:37 PM
 
20,975 posts, read 6,380,843 times
Reputation: 13966

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by WRnative View Post
Wallethub has ranked state preparedness to battle the COVID-19 virus. Click on the map for each state.

https://wallethub.com/edu/most-aggre...navirus/72307/

Florida is ranked 37. What is scary, and perplexing, hard-hit states New York and Washington are ranked 4th and 5th, perhaps reflecting efforts made once the virus already was vexing these states. E.g., New York and Washington rankings are boosted by their containment effort ranking.
Those rankings are pretty right-on. Rankings have zero to do with the number of cases....as, for instance, a number of NJ and NY and other cases (Boston) already are known to have come from Florida.

Rankings have to do with the amount of testing, the government response and such. It's obvious that ND isn't going to have millions coming and going like NY airports, etc. so NY is hard hit.

It's not what you have - it's what you do with what you have. Vast numbers all around the country will end up infected because of what Florida didn't do.

If anyone is reading this and lives in the Villages and is thinking of going back there...don't.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-21-2020, 03:50 AM
 
9,598 posts, read 6,338,560 times
Reputation: 5531
Quote:
Originally Posted by davery5872 View Post
We would drive. In Florida, we could drive around in the convertible and do some kayaking. Here in Ohio, we watch TV and I do some yard work. I have heard the heat theory, but I'm not sure I believe it. Last time I checked Florida has over 2.5 times the number of cases as Ohio (432 to 170), but only has twice the population. Of course all this data is suspect, since tests appear to be scarce and the CDC does not release the exact number of cases in each state. The top health official in Ohio said a few days ago she would not be surprised to have 100,000 undiagnosed cases in Ohio right now. Probably the biggest roadblock to us heading to Florida is the condition of the health care system. I don't know this, but would suspect the Florida health care system is closer to their maximum ability to manage the virus than Ohio is. All that being said, another gloomy day with no sun and we will probably get in the car and start driving south.
Don't focus on confirmed cases anywhere, as testing capacity in the U.S. is horrific, and varies greatly from state to state, and even from county to county. Ohio's confirmed cases are heavily weighted to Cuyahoga County (Cleveland) and to Greater Cleveland, because there is a much more robust testing capability there than in other parts of Ohio. Lucas County (Toledo) is shutting down testing capacity, and Ohio's governor has warned about the likelihood of continuing serious shortage of testing capacity state-wide.

See post 31 here:

https://www.city-data.com/forum/ohio...l#post57623699

It's doubtful that testing prospects are much different in Florida, as apparently there is a crippling national shortage of testing supplies, including swabs and reagents, as discussed at the above link. The difference between Ohio and Florida may be that Ohio's Gov. Mike DeWine has waged an aggressive battle requiring personal sacrifices against COVID-19 and may be sharing the bad news outlook with his constituents.

A lack of testing capability may make an imminent national lock down extremely likely, as discussed in the linked post. So this paragraph and article may be most relevant to you.

<<Whether you are reading this in your living room in Vancouver, office in London, or on a subway in New York City, you need to think hard, and fast, about two crucial questions: Where, and with whom, do you want to spend the next six to 12 weeks of your life, hunkered down for the epidemic duration? And what can you do to make that place as safe as possible for yourself and those around you?>>

https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/03/18...ckdown-coming/

If you want to rely on statistics, focus on hospitalizations and deaths, as these statistics apparently are the only reliable ones reflecting the relative degree of the COVID-19 crisis between states, as testing is so woefully inadequate and unequal in its availability.

Ohio has 39 hospitalizations and 1 death as of 3/20.

https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/

Florida has 117 hospitalizations and 11 deaths reported as of 3/20.

https://floridadisaster.org/globalas...03-20-1740.pdf

Florida's population is 1.85 times that of Ohio.

These numbers will grow exponentially in coming days, so you might want to examine closely the rate of change for both states. Certainly attempt to weigh the medical infrastructures of your two communities.

Two additional considerations IMO.

1) Do you want to spend the summer in Florida given the good possibility of a national lock down?

2) What happens in Florida if a hurricane or tropical storm devastate the state? Will Florida's emergency infrastructure, perhaps even FEMA, suffer with a natural disaster competing for resources with the COVID-19 epidemic? Will the red tide return in coming months making areas near the ocean a health risk, and making beaches unavailable for enjoyment?

Good luck!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2020, 08:47 AM
 
2,148 posts, read 516,977 times
Reputation: 1560
Quote:
Originally Posted by davery5872 View Post
...I don't know how much longer I can hold my wife back from going to the condo in SRQ.

Isn't a condo higher risk because you have shared elevators and shared entrance/exits. Plus common areas that can have other people, which increases risk of spread.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2020, 08:51 AM
 
20,975 posts, read 6,380,843 times
Reputation: 13966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Variable View Post
Isn't a condo higher risk because you have shared elevators and shared entrance/exits. Plus common areas that can have other people, which increases risk of spread.
We have a single house here - I think you are correct in that a condo is the last place I'd want to be if it had common areas that you MUST traverse.

But many condos are just townhouses and the like....where most everything is separate.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2020, 08:53 AM
 
18,613 posts, read 12,231,493 times
Reputation: 6302
We are baking away in mid and upper 80's and it won't slow it down.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2020, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Ohio/Sarasota
913 posts, read 2,163,126 times
Reputation: 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Variable View Post
Isn't a condo higher risk because you have shared elevators and shared entrance/exits. Plus common areas that can have other people, which increases risk of spread.
Our condo is more like a townhouse with an outside entrance. But that being said, while we would not have to encounter others, as all common areas are closed - we would be living much closer to others in the condo.

I think the thing I find most frustrating is the lack of reliable information. It seems as if the federal government is nowhere to be found and this pandemic is being handle almost entirely by the governors, which results in inconsistent policies.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2020, 12:00 PM
 
137 posts, read 221,604 times
Reputation: 81
I live in a condo in Tampa, 4 stories.
Just using the elevator is scary. Most of the time it is loaded with other people like sardines.
Not a lot of room. Same with the parking area, trash room, exit doors etc.
All very disconcerting. I try to do all Stoff late at night unfortunately grocery shopping is not one it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2020, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Mtns of Waynesville,NC & Nokomis, FL
4,498 posts, read 8,932,652 times
Reputation: 5839
SFH here at our EscapeWinterHouse and, at our Mtn Home back in western NC, so no problem.

For the Condo people, why not take the stairs, if mobile. Good exercise, only doing once or twice a day, etc.
I would skip the elevators.
GL, mD
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2020, 01:49 PM
 
1,620 posts, read 1,749,244 times
Reputation: 810
For those of you that feel safer ordering supplies/groceries online for delivery - be careful.

As reported by the NY Times:

‘Terrified’ Package Delivery Employees Are Going to Work Sick
https://news.google.com/articles/CAI...S&ceid=US%3Aen

** Truckers and warehouse workers at UPS and FedEx feel they have no choice but to keep showing up, even with coronavirus-like symptoms.

Hour after hour, day after day, the packages keep arriving: food, medicine, clothes, toys and a million other items brought to the doorsteps and building lobbies of Americans who are hunkering down as the coronavirus sweeps the land.

An increasing number of the workers sorting those boxes, loading them into trucks and then transporting and delivering them around the country have fallen sick. **

Last edited by wondermint2; 03-21-2020 at 02:39 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-21-2020, 02:53 PM
 
20,975 posts, read 6,380,843 times
Reputation: 13966
Quote:
Originally Posted by wondermint2 View Post
For those of you that feel safer ordering supplies/groceries online for delivery - be careful.

As reported by the NY Times:

‘Terrified’ Package Delivery Employees Are Going to Work Sick
https://news.google.com/articles/CAI...S&ceid=US%3Aen

** Truckers and warehouse workers at UPS and FedEx feel they have no choice but to keep showing up, even with coronavirus-like symptoms.

Hour after hour, day after day, the packages keep arriving: food, medicine, clothes, toys and a million other items brought to the doorsteps and building lobbies of Americans who are hunkering down as the coronavirus sweeps the land.

An increasing number of the workers sorting those boxes, loading them into trucks and then transporting and delivering them around the country have fallen sick. **
I'm sure they have always gone to work sick.

AND, there is not yet a single case of a person being infected by a package or the contents.....

The thing about science is that fear itself and our own projections don't mean much.

When we find out a couple dozen or more certified cases are traced to a package then we can think about it. Until then I'll go with the basics.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Sarasota - Bradenton - Venice area

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top