U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Savannah area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 02-10-2011, 12:45 PM
 
175 posts, read 374,155 times
Reputation: 33

Advertisements

Looking to do some serious gardening, tree planting and such. Wondering what flowering trees, shrubs, thrive here with minimum fuss, Local is better since the can take the weather and such. What would you recommend?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-10-2011, 01:39 PM
 
7,100 posts, read 25,251,548 times
Reputation: 7356
Suggest that you go to a local nursey like Hester and Zipperer and see what they have available. Just about all the flowering fruit type trees, (peach almond, pear, crab apple, etc.) do well. Azaleas and Camellias do well unless you happen to be in one of the few places that DON"T have acid type soil.

Forget about lilacs and other things that require cold nights to set blooms. Roses don't do well because the humidty causes a lot of mold. You have to do a lot of spraying. Decide how much you want to be evergreen. Hydrangeas do well, but lose their leaves in the winter. so do the various Rose of Sharron varities.

It's really almost too late to think about planting this spring. We usually plant bushes/trees/etc. in the fall so that they can get the root system down before the heat starts up. Look around you starting now, and see what your neighbors have. If the area is one of the older ones, you'll be able to see what does well in your section.

This has been an unusual cold, on and off, winter. A lot of things that would normally be putting out new growth and flowers about mid-March aren't going to be that early this year.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2011, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Sunny South Florida
6,802 posts, read 3,483,113 times
Reputation: 8061
I'd also hit up website(s) adminstered by the Cooperative Extension Service. I took their Master Gardener course about ten years ago and learned a lot about what grows here and why. I think locally-based garden shops like Hester and Zipperer would be more likely to carry the best locally-grown options rather than places like Home Depot or Lowe's (though they do carry all the major staples). The trouble I've seen with the big garden stores is that they make these huge deals with greenhouses across the country, and distribute equal numbers of these plants all over the country, regardless of their growth zones. Every year I see rhododendrons in the HD garden shop; if you visit a month later, you see them still on their tables, in their final stages of death. (They may grow fine in north GA, but the sun is too intense for them here and they just bake.)

Good rule of thumb: if you see something growing and thriving in front of businesses or in landscaping features around town, it probably means it's either native or something that can do well here with low maintenance. Landscapers for such businesses can't afford to plant stuff for clients that dies and makes the client unhappy, forcing an expensive re-planting. If you see someone planting a certain plant or tree in their yard because they want something in their yard "that no one else has," there's usually a good reason no one else has it in their yard.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2011, 06:12 AM
 
175 posts, read 374,155 times
Reputation: 33
Sounds good, lots of good tips. I been looking at the zones for plants and so, but this is the first time I can plant any in my yard! I love hydrangea nikko blue, and frost proof gardenia, Crape Myrtles of any kind. I will be checking out the nursery you suggested!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2011, 08:04 AM
 
175 posts, read 374,155 times
Reputation: 33
Also wondering if the plumeria tree will grow in Savannah? I fell in love with this tree when I lived in Hawaii, and was wanting to bring back the smell that filled my old home. I hear Savannah referred to as sub tropical, so I hope I can...
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2011, 10:05 AM
 
7,100 posts, read 25,251,548 times
Reputation: 7356
I found this.... It's the 40 degree temp. that would cause trouble. If you planted it in a container and brought it in, you might get by with it.

...."Plumerias (Frangipani) also known as the Lei flower, is native to warm tropical areas of the Pacific Islands, Caribbean, South America and Mexico. Plumerias can grow to be large shrubs or even small trees in mild areas of the U.S. In tropical regions, Plumeria may reach a height of 30' to 40' and half as wide. They have widely spaced thick succulent branches, round or pointed, long leather, fleshy leaves in clusters near the branch tips. Sensitive to cold, leaves tend to fall in early winter since they are deciduous. In colder climates they should be grown in containers. They make beautiful potted plants for the patio or greenhouse. In milder climates, plumeria can be grown outdoors in the ground, where they may be a small beautiful landscape trees. When temperatures dip into the low 40's they may be stored in their containers or uprooted carefully trying to take as much root as possible and stored over winter in a heated basement or garage where temperatures are kept above freezing. As soon as temperatures rise outdoors they can be brought out and planted again. They will resume growth, leaf out and begin to grow as if nothing happened. The real payoff comes during the early summer through the early fall months, when very fragrant clusters of showy, waxy flowers provide the makings for your own Hawaiian Lei. There is absolutely nothing like the sweet fragrance of Plumeria in flower, with fragrances of jasmine, citrus, spices, gardenia, and other indescribable scents. These flowers are treasured by the Polynesian Islanders for their durability, fragrances and colors of whites, yellows, pinks, reds, and multiple pastels. Flowering can last up to 3 months at a time producing new blooms everyday. Once picked, a bloom can last for several days without wilting if kept in water
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2011, 10:18 AM
 
175 posts, read 374,155 times
Reputation: 33
Awesome, gotta invest in some large pots
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2011, 01:50 PM
 
55 posts, read 104,495 times
Reputation: 23
One of my neighbor has what looks like a nursery on her porch everyday after 9am and then it all disappears after dark. I wonder what her livingroom looks like at night? I also wonder if she's brought in any "visitors". But container/pot gardening in the winter has its definite advantages. Plants will live all year round here.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2011, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
40,260 posts, read 49,770,923 times
Reputation: 68871
I think you just moved here, right? I just moved last June, and formerly had very good gardens, but I learned the hard way that anything that is borderline for zone 8 will probably croak, so don't go crazy with expensive plants. All summer, I tried a bunch of plants in planters and they all died because it was so hot. One of the palm trees I planted died this winter because it was too cold. I don't know where you moved from, but whatever you knew about gardening will probably not be applicable here.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2011, 10:13 AM
 
175 posts, read 374,155 times
Reputation: 33
OK, I have been looking at plants for a northern facing front end of my house, with deep shade, and moist soil for the most part. I and thinking hostas, astribes? Seeing to how it is so shady. Anyone have any issues with the humidity killing such? And due to the heat and humidity, should plants that are normally "Full Sun" thrive in a part shade area?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Savannah area
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top