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Old 10-21-2013, 12:27 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 27,194,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcia RT View Post
Does anyone know who 'initially' brought those huge river stones on shore and who first built up the shore and set those stone into the ground for the first few steep steps? I walked up them and they are steep and they are built with old stones. My husband says ships brought in the stones to shore. Deposited them because they used them to keep the ships lower in the water.

MY book merely mentions the area called River Street but i'd personally like to know who was responsible for starting work on the area. Maybe that's a part of history that's lost. Maybe like many, people don't know their history and presume or assume. I believe GA Historical Society is my best bet. Hopefully they will have some kind of documentation. Thanks Marcia
The stones are ballast stones. Sailing Ships all over the world had to use ballast until the ship was loaded with goods that were to be shipped back to Europe. Rather than just leaving them lying about, people used them. In this case, for paving. They were also used for house foundations. They came from everywhere.....even the northern US area.

Wood was the usual building material until Savannah developed it's own brick factory. Wood burns and has to be replaced, but it was available. We didn't have natural stone quarries for stone. Shipping it in was very expensive.

The work was done by men that lived in the area, slaves, freed slaves, whites, mixed and available. Paid or unpaid. The Slave owners were paid for the use of their slaves. It took a long time, as it was done as needed. Did you want their names? Some worked for years, some only a day or two.

This "history" is not lost. Children start learning in early in school. Your questions are not answerable in a way that will suit you. it's like asking "Who built Long Island?" "Who started Chicago?"
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Old 11-03-2013, 09:00 AM
 
6 posts, read 24,490 times
Reputation: 10
The history of Savannah is irrelevant to my story setting. I mention the street with it's cobbled stones and large water washed stones but what I want to know is who built the dock area up. Evidently no one here does. I contacted Ga Hist Soc. Looked at pictures. 1948 is the nearest to starting doing any kind of renovation. There are pictures of power companies laying lines and so forth. Besides dirt streets, boarded up buildings and the looks of a ghost town about the place it isn't until 1948 I find pictures of renovation. And I don't see any bricks on River Street, only dirt streets and roadways and boarded up buildings. I can only assume U are not from Savannah either Ellie or Newsboy or Padgett or you might know a little about the town you choose to live in. Thank you Daniel. I too figured slaves and coloniests began the construction but there is no proof. Like I said the pictures of River Street are there in the GA Hist Soc. I can't substantiate this data so as any good writer I seek answers. Thanks
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Old 11-03-2013, 09:04 AM
 
6 posts, read 24,490 times
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I am aware the stones were used aboard ships to balance them in the waters. Pictures pre dating 1948 however don't show the stones or bricks. And if I remember correctly slavery was abolished before 1948. So who set about renovating the area if it was a dirt street before that time? I certainly hope public schools don't teach something that isn't true.
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:13 AM
 
7,126 posts, read 11,712,241 times
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I can recommend a book that I read 30 years ago that has played an important part in my life in coaxing other people to give me information that they may have, but reluctant to give up. "How to Win Friends and Influence People" by Dale Carnegie. Although the publishing of this book dates back to 1936 I'm certain you will enjoy the techniques he uses to extract from others that which is important to the user.

Best of luck on your up and coming book.
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Old 11-03-2013, 12:36 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 27,194,782 times
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[quote=Marcia RT;32072752]I am aware the stones were used aboard ships to balance them in the waters. Pictures pre dating 1948 however don't show the stones or bricks. And if I remember correctly slavery was abolished before 1948. So who set about renovating the area if it was a dirt street before that time? I certainly hope public schools don't teach something that isn't true.[/

Will you take the word of someone that was living in Savannah prior to 1948??? River Street was NOT a dirt street. The cobblestones were down much earlier than that. It looks like a dirt street because no one swept the dirt off the cobblestones. The bricks were there also. This was not a well used section. But I can remember in the 1930s, riding down River Street. There were not the stores and restaurants there at that time. The entire section was decaying...It was merely a way to get from one place to another and lined with old unused warehouses.. The River Street that you see today is NOT the street that it was then. It was NOT a place for foot traffic. The tourist street that you see now, is the same River Street, but it was run down, beat up, and falling to pieces. AND it did have the cobblestones from the old ship ballast.
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Old 11-03-2013, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,709 posts, read 21,942,117 times
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My, my there are some nasty, cynical and downright mean people on this site.
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Old 11-03-2013, 03:12 PM
 
7,126 posts, read 11,712,241 times
Reputation: 2600
[quote=Padgett2;32075106]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcia RT View Post
I am aware the stones were used aboard ships to balance them in the waters. Pictures pre dating 1948 however don't show the stones or bricks. And if I remember correctly slavery was abolished before 1948. So who set about renovating the area if it was a dirt street before that time? I certainly hope public schools don't teach something that isn't true.[/

Will you take the word of someone that was living in Savannah prior to 1948??? River Street was NOT a dirt street. The cobblestones were down much earlier than that. It looks like a dirt street because no one swept the dirt off the cobblestones. The bricks were there also. This was not a well used section. But I can remember in the 1930s, riding down River Street. There were not the stores and restaurants there at that time. The entire section was decaying...It was merely a way to get from one place to another and lined with old unused warehouses.. The River Street that you see today is NOT the street that it was then. It was NOT a place for foot traffic. The tourist street that you see now, is the same River Street, but it was run down, beat up, and falling to pieces. AND it did have the cobblestones from the old ship ballast.
Mrs P. thank you very much for the real inside story. I'm sure O.P. will be very thankful for your posting.
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:56 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
11,396 posts, read 24,468,584 times
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Many of the modern improvements were made in the 1970's.

City celebrates 30th anniversary of Rousakis Plaza | savannahnow.com

I remember River St. before then. It was much more of an adventure to explore than now.
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Old 11-04-2013, 05:37 AM
 
6 posts, read 24,490 times
Reputation: 10
I am so sorry one question has generated so much animosity. I thought I'd get some information that would be beneficial but I haven't. All I've gotten is speculation and biting comments. And if someone on this forum is actually from Savannah I thought he or she might be proud of the city and give me some sites to look up pictures so forth. I guess I expected more from this site. Bye.
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Old 11-04-2013, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Savannah
975 posts, read 1,150,924 times
Reputation: 467
Yeesh. Such silliness. The ultimate authority on matters of historical record in Savannah is the Georgia Historical Society. You were given the direct suggestion to look them up early on in the thread. Did you bother to call them? Just sayin' - a user forum is hardly an appropriate place to research historical facts. You'll get opinions from current residents, sure, but it doesn't sound like that's what you're really after, now, is it?
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