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Old 09-07-2019, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,124 posts, read 25,855,964 times
Reputation: 11226

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pink caddy View Post
Is there an incentive mandated by the Fed gub that a state must order a mandatory evac in order to be eligible for FEMA benefits after the storm and damages? I don't know why I have this in the back of my mind but I seem to recall something alone these lines.
Not sure about mandatory evacuations, but they do have to declare a state of emergency
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Old 09-07-2019, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Savannah
884 posts, read 860,284 times
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That's correct, evacuations are not required to receive FEMA benefits. An official declaration of a state of emergency is a bureaucratic process involving the Governor of a given affected state, and one that is intended to enable various levels of assistance provided by the federal government. It also is a precursor to the President potentially taking that declaration "to the next level" and involving more federal resources.

https://www.fema.gov/declaration-process
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Old 09-08-2019, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
40,243 posts, read 49,757,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellhead View Post
Climate change is taking place because of all of the CO2 being emitted. Let's not sugar coat this.
Perhaps, but unless China and India are on board, which they are not, you and your electric car, or reusable straw will be a huge waste of effort.
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Old 09-09-2019, 09:19 AM
 
3,868 posts, read 5,557,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Perhaps, but unless China and India are on board, which they are not, you and your electric car, or reusable straw will be a huge waste of effort.
Your completely wrong on this, economics will be the driving factor & we are cusp of the economics changing from a carbon based economy to a electric/hydrogen based. The rise of solar/wind/battery are the driving economic factors.

It is now cheaper to build new wind farms than to maintain legacy coal plants. We are no longer talking about 100 MW peaker coal plants like Plant Kraft in Savannah. We are talking large baseload plants which are already paid for. A recent bid for new generation, wind came in at $11 MWH compared to over $50 MWH for coal, solar is in the mid 30's & dropping fast, with forecasting showing solar will be around $15 MWH in 2021. Plants which were slated to close in 20 years are now being retired much faster than anticipated.

https://www.nwcouncil.org/news/coal-retirements

Southern Company "king of coal" is now closing gas peaker plants & replacing them solar/battery backup generation. The reason for this has to be ROI, it is now cheaper to close peaker gas plants & replace them with solar & grid based storage. Other companies are following suit.

There are 10 grid battery backup systems of over a 100MW which will go online in the next 24 months, the biggest one is a behemoth 400MW solar/battery system in Florida. Duke is expected to announce several large battery projects as their coal plants are only operating at 33% of maximum, providing voltage regulation which can be done much cheaper by grid storage, this will allow them to retire several large coal plants.

During the next few years, we are going to start to see every transmission yard add large scale storage & solar, a switchyard is what ties transmission lines from plants together before going to a city. The bigger ones are 230k to 500k, adding 100MW's of storage to these yards will drastically cut emissions from coal plants as they are the most costly to operate. I've seen some forecasts showing all coal plants will close by 2030 in the US because of this, Nuclear will be a benefactor as they can run flat out all the time & charge these batteries. Also the battery storage will help out with voltage regulation. In the 2030's grid storage will extend to distribution sub-stations. AI will tie all of this together.

https://energyacuity.com/blog/2019-t...tery-projects/

The 20's will see batteries replace oil as the dominant means of transportation as battery prices decline, & advances in battery tech continue.

Last edited by bellhead; 09-09-2019 at 10:06 AM..
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Old 09-14-2019, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Savannah
884 posts, read 860,284 times
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Here's an interesting follow-up on the actual cost of evacuation I mentioned earlier in this thread. The State, having ordered the evacuation, has issued notice that it will not be reimbursing Chatham County for any associated costs.

https://www.wtoc.com/2019/09/13/chat...during-dorian/
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Old 09-15-2019, 03:27 AM
 
392 posts, read 267,423 times
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It is interesting that the state required the evacuations and won't reimburse the cities and counties for some of the expenses they incurred. They should cover at least a portion of the cost since they took it upon themselves to make the evacuation order instead of the counties.
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Old 09-15-2019, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Savannah
884 posts, read 860,284 times
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I'm not sure it's necessarily incumbent on the state to reimburse county expenses in all cases. I was just illustrating my point that mandatory evacuations are expensive. That $1,000,000 plus for the county is multiplied by the other counties involved. But, it's just the hard cost to the operating budget of the county, and speaks nothing of the personal costs shared by all the residents and businesses that evacuated or lost business and work due to the mandatory order.

Storms are natural events, and are not the fault of any government. The way governments react and respond, however, are totally human factors. Safety, of course, should always be the #1 consideration. However, it was pretty clear that the mandatory order was unnecessary for such a wide swath of the coast well before the storm arrived. The order was premature and brute force, plain and simple. Better public policy involves recognizing mistakes like that and making better decisions and plans that are more sensible in terms of who gets evacuated, and when.
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Old 09-15-2019, 04:30 PM
 
392 posts, read 267,423 times
Reputation: 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoastalGAGuy View Post
Storms are natural events, and are not the fault of any government. The way governments react and respond, however, are totally human factors. Safety, of course, should always be the #1 consideration. However, it was pretty clear that the mandatory order was unnecessary for such a wide swath of the coast well before the storm arrived. The order was premature and brute force, plain and simple. Better public policy involves recognizing mistakes like that and making better decisions and plans that are more sensible in terms of who gets evacuated, and when.
I agree with you completely. My concern about reimbursement was exactly what you stated. It was a wide swath that was premature and ended up being completely unnecessary. That was why I was expecting the state to assist. What ever happened to the individual counties issuing the evacuation orders? It changed during Mathew I think.
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Old 09-15-2019, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Sunny South Florida
6,800 posts, read 3,480,833 times
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It was probably an overreaction for the authorities to convert both paths of I-16 to flow west. I recall watching a reporter standing on an overpass (the Statesboro exit) after the contra-flow thing was implemented, and there was barely any traffic in the (regularly) westbound lane, and not a single car in the typically eastbound lane that had been switched. Such a conversion has to cost a lot in terms of sending all those workers out to pull down the barriers and have cop cars sitting on the ramps. If those cops were local police (not GSP), then I can't help but feel like that was an unnecessary expense inflicted on the counties at a time when they needed their policemen doing more important duties than just sitting at the end of an on-ramp that already had a metal barrier down to stop people from trying to enter.

The novelty of seeing the interstate traffic all going in one direction is interesting, but in this case I think putting that plan in motion was an overreaction and unnecessary expense.
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Old 04-06-2020, 09:11 PM
 
2,016 posts, read 1,750,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Of course, climate change is happening, but it is the natural ebb and flow of the universe, and a bunch of lib wackos want you to believe that you can affect it at all.
you can stop building in flood zones. Duh. The south is generally behind the curve on smart engineering in this arena. dig a hole, call it retention. Spend more money in the long haul on maintaining vast infrastructure instead of just leaving rivers to run their course and vegetation to suck water up. And in rebuilding over and over. But gee I guess that's a lib wacko idea. You would refuse lib wacko big gov't money if your house floods by the way, right? You know we missed that storm being a flood problem by only six hours, it hit at low tide.
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