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Old 03-29-2012, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
349 posts, read 589,873 times
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I'm honestly surprised that more houses aren't built in a circular shape, compared to the typical box form. A monolithic dome structure can handle severe wind and damage done by tornadoes and possibly hurricanes... depends on location, I guess.

I'm new to this and haven't posted a link before, so please excuse me if this is a mess. Monolithic Dome homes, schools, churches, storages, gyms and more

There are plenty already built (and can be built out of many types of materials!) compared to your typical building structure.

Plus, they're cheaper to heat/cool

A house on stilts, basically, that could move up and down would probably price itself right out of the market for most folks. Which is unfortunate, but true. :\
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Old 03-29-2012, 10:17 AM
 
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It'd be far cheaper to just rebuild the house a couple of times.
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Old 03-30-2012, 05:17 AM
 
2,245 posts, read 4,011,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jezer View Post
They've done it already!

See clip at 56 seconds;


Stingray TV intro (1964) - YouTube
Now if only we could find a way to convert the human race into little marionettes, we could get started on building those little sinking houses to live in.
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Old 03-30-2012, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Wilsonville, OR
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It'd be sort of like a singular version of the buildings in the Geofront in Neon Genesis Evangelion. In this image, they're in the down (battle mode) position:

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Old 03-30-2012, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
11,787 posts, read 16,227,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunar Delta View Post
It'd be sort of like a singular version of the buildings in the Geofront in Neon Genesis Evangelion. In this image, they're in the down (battle mode) position:
I figured some other nerd would beat me too that. The animators of that show go to great detail to show how such a city would actually look and work, even though it is absurd and impossible to actually implement.

But one house? I'm thinking there has to be a way, but that it would end up not being very pretty to look at and of course, wildy expensive.
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Old 03-30-2012, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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I had an idea a few years ago (before flat screens), that a government mandate should require that alll computer monitors and TV sets have to be designed like Legos, so they can snap together to construct buildings. Just think how many people could have been housed in a hundred million discarded large electronic devices. Which could be easily disassembled and moved elsewhere, according to population shifts.
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Old 04-01-2012, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 9,717,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jezer View Post
You're welcome todd!

There is also this design available;

The Base Room ® Company
I was wondering if flooding would be a factor. I just see a way down the stairs to a point where there is a door, but not how to get out for some time...
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Old 04-01-2012, 07:29 PM
 
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There are pre-fab houses now that are designed to be hurricane, tornado and flood proof. I saw a demo of one with walls designed to withstand hurricane force winds, and was built on thick, deeply embeded concrete stilts to prevent flooding.

Here's a link that's similar.


Elevated Stilt Homes - Tornado Proof, Flood proof, Fire proof, and hurricane proof homes.
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Old 04-01-2012, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Texas
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I might have to have a bit more money one of these days... But it looks good.
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Old 04-01-2012, 11:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
I might have to have a bit more money one of these days... But it looks good.
The ones shown in the link seem like commercial structures or pretty large homes, larger than I could afford. I did see something on CNN of a more ordinary sized home that was make for a grandmother who lost her home during Hurricane Katrina. It was made in a factory in large sections (walls, roof, floors, etc.) then hauled and assembled on site. Strong support pillars were sunk in the ground, with the floor of the house several feet above the ground. The idea for this stilt arrangement was not only high enough to keep the house dry from flooding, but would let the wind blow through more easily.

In addition, the walls were extremely strong. But the interesting part was that the interior walls (which were pre-fabbed) were used to strengthen the outer walls of the house, the the corners of the exterior walls overlapped and nailed together for added strength. I can't remember how the roof was designed, but it too was built strong enough to at least withstand the most powerful hurricane winds on record (or better). The posts of the house not only were made to keep the house above flood water, but were also important parts to strengthen the house as well.

I don't remember what the estimated price was, but it seems like it was comparable to any typical home. Part of the reason why it wasn't greatly expensive is because it's prefabricated. All they had to do is load up the parts and deliver it to the property to be assembled. I think the entire house was completely assembled on site in a single day. The posts were installed a few days before the parts for the house was delivered. It looked like it was mostly bolting all the pieces together. The whole thing was remarkable.
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