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Old 05-27-2012, 06:33 AM
 
Location: SW MO
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Cysticercosis is a disease that arises when a person eats infected pork fro a hog that has eaten feces from a human tapeworm host. The infected pork is usually visibly affected, leading to the term "measly pork" being used to describe it. The chain of events in the lifecycle of the parasite generally do not exist in the U.S. Human sewage goes into proper processing and hogs cannot get into it. Our meat is also inspected prior to sale and consumption so if there was an infected hog, the meat would be discarded prior to infection. This is not the case in many third-world countries- there is little to no meat inspection, hogs get into human feces and become infected, and starving people may very well decide to eat knowingly infected meat anyway. The vast majority of the cases described in the medical literature are either immigrants to the U.S. (generally Hispanics) or people who have close contact with immigrants. Cysticercosis can be spread by an infected person to an infected person via the fecal-oral route, which has led to cases such as orthodox Jews and Muslims becoming infected even though they themselves do not eat pork.

If you want more information, look at the papers like Taenia solium Tapeworm Infection, Oregon, 2006 as there is a decent summary of the epidemiology (particularly in the introduction, table #3, and the discussion.
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Old 05-27-2012, 09:16 AM
 
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It is my understanding that hogs raised for the legal market in the USA have a near-zero risk of infection by any pathogens, because of the controlled conditions under which they are fed and raised. A great majority of the few cases of pork-borne disease reported in the USA can be traced to immigrants raising their own free-range pork. You can eat store-bought pork and eat it raw every day, and still have very low risk of such infection.
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Old 05-28-2012, 02:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
I'm definitely not implying that all or most parasites are good for humans as that's part of the reason why i posted this thread about tapeworms and i do know that many parasites can cause sickness and disease however that being said parasites and/or their eggs are ubiquitous in our outdoor enviroment and have been before we humans arrived and so we ''evolved'' with them over the hundreds of thousands of years in co-existence as we (science) are starting to now realise that we need certain strains of bacteria and/or parasites for health hence ''probiotics'' formulas as one example.
I know you didn't mean to imply that. i was just adding my 2-cents worth. There's little question that we've evolved with certain kinds of bacteria in our system. Our digestive system is loaded with them, as well as acids, to aid in helping break down food to release essential nutrients. That doesn't mean they're always safe though. Sometimes they can multiply out of control to the point of making us sick or even cause death.

I went through a close call with diverticulitis that required a 4-day stay in the hospital with IV administered antibiotics and other meds every 4 hours to get things under control. Even bacteria that are symbiotic and essential for us can sometimes turn and become a dangerous threat to us.

It's in that sense that I still think parasites posed some degree of risk to early humans, in effect resulting in a shorter lifespan. Of course, there were other survival risks that were hazardous as well. It's remarkable that early humans somehow managed to avoid complete extinction.

Quote:
I read a study not too long back about how kids who play outside in the dirt etc. which exposes them to certain strains of parasites and bacteria helps to prevent them from aquiring autoimmune diseases and psyche disorders as adults compared to ''sterile'' kids who mostly stayed indoors through out their childhoods as that tells me that as humans we evolved with many of the earths microscopic critters.
I agree that we can go overboard in sterilizing ourselves and kids, as well as overusing antibiotics, to combat harmful germs. It's a question of maintaining a healthy balance. Too much exposure can be as bad as too little.

Quote:
I think this article relates to what i was implying beforehand.
Are We Too Clean? Is Dirt Good For Kids? - Web MD
The article is a good one. It does mention parasites, but it doesn't say anything about tapeworms, whipworms, or hookworms. Regarding worms introduced inside the brain, it seems pretty certain these things will be reproducing. What is it these worms are suppose to do? How exactly are they removed or eliminated once their task is complete?
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Old 05-29-2012, 05:45 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,324,951 times
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Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
I went through a close call with diverticulitis that required a 4-day stay in the hospital with IV administered antibiotics and other meds every 4 hours to get things under control. Even bacteria that are symbiotic and essential for us can sometimes turn and become a dangerous threat to us.
Sorry that you had to go thru that ordeal. Did they state what caused it?

Anyway with the exception of tapeworm as i don't consume raw meat as a beef eater (no vegan here) i'm just not worried about parasites hurting me. Infact i suffer badly from grain consumption (celiac disease) than i ever have from eating meat and so just play it smart ny cooking your meat well and boil any water from rivers, streams etc. and i think we'll all do just fine

BTW i appreciate a few other posters posting about how our beef is safe here do to inspections as i've wondered at times if i ate ''rare cooked'' beef would i get tapeworm and so i think that i'll have a paleolithic T-Bone steak this morning
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Old 05-29-2012, 08:02 AM
 
5,366 posts, read 8,363,922 times
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
Sorry that you had to go thru that ordeal. Did they state what caused it?

Anyway with the exception of tapeworm as i don't consume raw meat as a beef eater (no vegan here) i'm just not worried about parasites hurting me. Infact i suffer badly from grain consumption (celiac disease) than i ever have from eating meat and so just play it smart ny cooking your meat well and boil any water from rivers, streams etc. and i think we'll all do just fine

BTW i appreciate a few other posters posting about how our beef is safe here do to inspections as i've wondered at times if i ate ''rare cooked'' beef would i get tapeworm and so i think that i'll have a paleolithic T-Bone steak this morning
Hopefully, I'll never experience that problem again. I had never heard of it before it happened. Diverticulitis can develop in people over 40, with males affected by it more often than females. It's not uncommon, but the exact cause is not clearly understood. In my case, although I can't be certain, I can't help but feel that a procedure to inspect the intestines a couple of days earlier may have provided the opportunity for it to become infected, not from any unsanitary conditions though. It's just that having my guts completely empty may have enabled bacteria to work their way into the diverticula pouches and start rapidly multiplying. The bacteria are always present regardless of how cleaned out your intestines are. The hospital said I did exactly right thing by going in early rather than wait and hope it just clears up on its own. Evidently there are people who wait too long. Had I waited one more day, I might not be here writing this reply. The onset was extremely rapid, severe and painful. As it was, I was semiconscious by the time I got to the hospital. It's never happened since. I don't take unusual changes in health for granted.
Diverticulitis - MayoClinic.com

Personally, I think the suggestion someone else made earlier that it's safe to eat raw commercially raised pork is a really bad idea. It's pretty easy to think the conditions where the animals are raised are sparkling clean and sterile. It may be cleaner than conditions for free range pigs and hogs, but it's still pretty messy, and parasites can and do get in anyway even though FDA inspectors may be present to check the standards of cleanliness. Insects, rodents, birds can still get in. I would encourage anyone who thinks meat processing plants (slaughterhouses) are so clean that you can safely eat raw pork or meat with no concern at all, to go visit one.

While standards in the US are high (it's never 100% free of contamination), that's not always the case in many other countries around the world. I like eating meat too. I agree with your point, to thoroughly cook meats, whether it's pork, beef, poultry or seafood, to ensure that not only parasites, but any harmful bacteria are killed off. All it takes is one time to get really sick to change a person's life and their mind about eating raw meat. It might be okay, but it's very risky.
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Old 05-29-2012, 11:52 AM
 
Location: in your dreams
11,741 posts, read 14,109,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post

Personally, I think the suggestion someone else made earlier that it's safe to eat raw commercially raised pork is a really bad idea.
Yeah that probably wouldn't even taste good, lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar
The article is a good one. It does mention parasites, but it doesn't say anything about tapeworms, whipworms, or hookworms. Regarding worms introduced inside the brain, it seems pretty certain these things will be reproducing. What is it these worms are suppose to do? How exactly are they removed or eliminated once their task is complete?
Basically to feed off the host, which in most cases results in death if not detected and treated in time. (Treatment usually involves brain surgery and/or very strong medications to kill the parasites)


I did see a program about a young toddler in the United States who picked up some kind of parasite from ingesting contaminated animal feces at a local playground. (The culprit was an infected raccoon) It went directly to his brain, started feeding and destroyed both his vision as well as caused permanent brain damage. It was a really, really sad story...

Though I'm sure these things are rare, they do happen. And because most doctors in the U.S. are so unfamilar w/ parasites, they usually fail to detect or even test for them until it is almost too late.
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Old 05-29-2012, 01:45 PM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,324,951 times
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Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Personally, I think the suggestion someone else made earlier that it's safe to eat raw commercially raised pork is a really bad idea.
I definately agree !!!
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