U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-05-2012, 10:49 PM
 
5,366 posts, read 8,370,423 times
Reputation: 3412

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
I can understand how the Higgs boson could be distributed everywhere throughout the universe as a result of inflation, but from what I understand the Higgs boson decays almost immediately into two hadrons and two electrons. During the Hardon Epoch there should be no bosons left, just a soup of quarks, anti-quarks, baryons, and mesons. So I am a bit confused how something like the Higgs field could exist in the first place.
Here's something else I came across that might help clarify things a bit.



The Higgs Boson, Part I - YouTube
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-07-2012, 11:12 AM
 
5,366 posts, read 8,370,423 times
Reputation: 3412
Press conference





CERN Update: "Is it the Higgs Boson?" - YouTube
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2012, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,824 posts, read 20,775,493 times
Reputation: 6506
That press conference video was great, it explained a great deal. Thanks!

I also got the impression that they REALLY wanted this boson to be something other than the Standard Model Higgs-boson. They confirmed that it does fit the Standard Model Higgs-boson, but they are hoping it will be more. As he said, there are four types of Higgs-bosons, including the Standard Model and three others that fit the Standard Model but are more than what they appear. Understandable, since the Standard Model does not explain gravity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2012, 12:23 PM
 
5,366 posts, read 8,370,423 times
Reputation: 3412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
That press conference video was great, it explained a great deal. Thanks!

I also got the impression that they REALLY wanted this boson to be something other than the Standard Model Higgs-boson. They confirmed that it does fit the Standard Model Higgs-boson, but they are hoping it will be more. As he said, there are four types of Higgs-bosons, including the Standard Model and three others that fit the Standard Model but are more than what they appear. Understandable, since the Standard Model does not explain gravity.
As scientists, they pretty much have to cover their bases for now. It's going to take more time to determine exactly what it is and whether or not it's scalar. If it turns out to be the Higgs, it'll be a very big deal, even though it'll still be necessary to narrow it down to determine which Higgs it is. On the other hand, if it turns out to be some other exotic, unknown particle with a signature similar to what's predicted for the Higgs, that too will be a very big deal. Either way, I think it's safe to say that it's probably a boson of some kind. Either way, the discovery is very important because an incredibly microscopic particle has been detected that's never been seen before. It's a new threshold that's been reached. That in itself is profound and worthy to celebrate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2012, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Upstate, South Carolina
356 posts, read 599,185 times
Reputation: 154
Question to those that know more, do gravitons or gravity waves fit in the standard model? If so with the Higgs now basically confirmed would that be the final piece of the puzzle for unified theory?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,824 posts, read 20,775,493 times
Reputation: 6506
Quote:
Originally Posted by scme5 View Post
Question to those that know more, do gravitons or gravity waves fit in the standard model? If so with the Higgs now basically confirmed would that be the final piece of the puzzle for unified theory?
From what I understand the Standard Model does not explain gravity. While they did find a Higgs-boson particle, they are not sure which of the four possible Higgs-boson particles it may be. They are hoping that the particle will not only fit the Standard Model, but also lead them to discover other possible interactions that could explain gravity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2012, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Westwood, MA
3,841 posts, read 4,954,434 times
Reputation: 4893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
I can understand how the Higgs boson could be distributed everywhere throughout the universe as a result of inflation, but from what I understand the Higgs boson decays almost immediately into two hadrons and two electrons. During the Hardon Epoch there should be no bosons left, just a soup of quarks, anti-quarks, baryons, and mesons. So I am a bit confused how something like the Higgs field could exist in the first place.
A simple typo with hadrons can make a funny statement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
From what I understand the Standard Model does not explain gravity. While they did find a Higgs-boson particle, they are not sure which of the four possible Higgs-boson particles it may be. They are hoping that the particle will not only fit the Standard Model, but also lead them to discover other possible interactions that could explain gravity.
You're right. The Standard Model successfully explains particles, but doesn't even attempt to explain gravity. Part of the problem now is that our understanding is too complete for the things we can measure. Not complete in the sense of absolutely describing everything, but complete as in "we know its wrong and seems ad hoc, but we can't tell how so it's the best we can do." One common complaint is that there are a lot of free parameters--theorists feel like "the right theory" should have a couple of fundamental parameters and all the others (like quark and lepton masses, boson masses, coupling constants) should fall out of those (in much the same way that elemental nuclear masses are explained by multiples of protons and neutrons and not just 100+ random numbers chosen out of the air)

A large sea of explanations already exist that include gravity, but as yet they don't make any quantitative predictions that are any different than other theories so there is no way of knowing if they're right or totally out in left field. Some theorists even go as far as saying all the fundamental constants can take almost any value and we just happen to be looking at one set. They could be right, but most scientists don't feel satisfied enough with those sorts of answers and subjectively want something with more meaning. Those scientists really hope there's something funny about this particle and that can help shed light on which of the myriad number of theories are definitely wrong and knowledge will advance.

Alternately, this could turn out to be exactly what everyone expected (i.e. the standard model) and we won't learn much. It's possible that the standard model is correct up to the Planck scale, where particles are so massive they essentially become black holes, and no experiment will directly tell us which theories could be correct. It's safe to assume we'll never reach the Planck scale in my lifetime (the Planck energy is 1.22e28 eV, this particle is 1.25e11 eV and just within reach), so any advancement will likely have to come from either there being new physics at lower energy scales (what experimental physicists hope) or some indirect measurement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2012, 11:35 PM
 
649 posts, read 704,107 times
Reputation: 710
My theory is the gods created a god particle in order to make people believe there is a god or a creator of this world. They create magic for science to build paradigms and principal to dance around. The real question should be where do we go when we die.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2012, 11:15 AM
 
271 posts, read 142,640 times
Reputation: 78
Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, what next?

There are two anomalies that are in need of an explanation: a) In the diphoton decay channel, the Higgs boson produces an excess of photons, about one-and-a-half times the rate predicted by the standard model; b) a Higgs boson of about 125 GeV should decay into tau particles about six per cent of the time, but it seems to be doing it a lot less than that. Also, its spin is to be determined. The Higgs is a scalar, and therefore, its spin should be zero.

The LHC will hibernate for an upgrade, and then is expected to run smoothly, more than doubling the total amount of data collected. That could allow the tau, diphoton and spin questions to be settled within a year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2012, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Israel
165 posts, read 183,306 times
Reputation: 75
In which reference frame the Higgs boson was found ?

==.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top