U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-11-2012, 07:09 PM
 
31,372 posts, read 32,935,820 times
Reputation: 14916

Advertisements

I curious to understand why humans are not the prey of choice for top level predators? While examples of "man hunters" can be found in every group of top level predators, predatory attacks on humans are the exception not the norm, which is counter intuitive considering the speed, power, and defensive capabilities of unarmed humans, or have these predators had enough experience with armed humans to just stay the hell away - I doubt the later but I'm at a loss for explanations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-12-2012, 06:56 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,317,640 times
Reputation: 12153
In reference to our ''current'' era or during the Hunter-Gatherer stone age epoch?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2012, 10:05 AM
 
31,372 posts, read 32,935,820 times
Reputation: 14916
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
In reference to our ''current'' era or during the Hunter-Gatherer stone age epoch?
Apparently from what I've read from ancient human remains it doesn't appear that at any time modern humans were the prey of choice for top level predators.

Maybe I'm wrong but that's my impression.

Come to think of it, none of the great apes are the prey of choice for top level predators. And that seems to apply to intelligent marine life as well. You don't hear about Great Whites looking for dolphins or Killer Whales to hunt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2012, 01:28 PM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,317,640 times
Reputation: 12153
Quote:
Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
Apparently from what I've read from ancient human remains it doesn't appear that at any time modern humans were the prey of choice for top level predators.

Maybe I'm wrong but that's my impression.

Come to think of it, none of the great apes are the prey of choice for top level predators. And that seems to apply to intelligent marine life as well. You don't hear about Great Whites looking for dolphins or Killer Whales to hunt.
Yeap i've pondered about that as well as just how could small bands of some 50 to 75 humans leave africa 75,000 years ago to survive and eventually spawn to populate the entire planet is somewhat mind blowing to say the least. That being said i do think that several things come into play and so firstly that when confronted by an single ''apex'' predator while they could never have survived an 'one on one' encounter however with numbers there is strength as groups of males (possible females as well) all carrying sharpened stick and stone weapons could had fought off or even killed the predator and of course they assuredly produce fire which probably surved as an defensive measure as well.

You can see this survival approach in the animal world itself as for example back in the Pleistocene Epoch in North America Sabre Tooth Cats could had easily killed a Dire Wolf 'one on one' however Dire Wolves hunted and fought in packs and so it was extremely rare for a Sabre Cat to ever try to attack one as attacking one is attacking the entire pack or even today in the African Bush as an African Lion could easily kill a much smaller Hyena 'one on one' and yet because Hyenas hunt in much larger packs they will at numerous instances harrass and even frustrate the Lions to eventually take over their kill.

So i'm guessing that early stone age humans hunted and survived akin to how Hyenas do .

Last edited by Six Foot Three; 07-12-2012 at 01:53 PM.. Reason: changed - 6 ft 3
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2012, 04:31 PM
 
31,372 posts, read 32,935,820 times
Reputation: 14916
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
So i'm guessing that early stone age humans hunted and survived akin to how Hyenas do .
I guess. One argument that seems reasonable is that no animal has the endurance capacity of humans on the run. We may not be the fastest but we can outrun over distance any animal on the planet. A pack of humans even with rudimentary weapons was an unrelenting foe.

I also brought up an point about dolphins and killer whales, they to are the big brains of their domain and hunt in well orchestrated packs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2012, 09:25 PM
Status: "chickpea soup" (set 28 days ago)
 
18,765 posts, read 56,521,786 times
Reputation: 33182
Quote:
Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
I curious to understand why humans are not the prey of choice for top level predators? While examples of "man hunters" can be found in every group of top level predators, predatory attacks on humans are the exception not the norm, which is counter intuitive considering the speed, power, and defensive capabilities of unarmed humans, or have these predators had enough experience with armed humans to just stay the hell away - I doubt the later but I'm at a loss for explanations.
You don't read history enough. Humans HAVE BEEN a prey of choice of the big cats in India, Burma, Africa, and other places. Documented stories of such behavior abounds in older National Geographic magazines.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2012, 10:05 PM
 
31,372 posts, read 32,935,820 times
Reputation: 14916
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
You don't read history enough. Humans HAVE BEEN a prey of choice of the big cats in India, Burma, Africa, and other places. Documented stories of such behavior abounds in older National Geographic magazines.
I read plenty and humans as primary prey but rather sporadic aberrations which can often be pinpointed to a particular animal or group, like the pair of Tsavo lions that ravaged Kenya in the 1890's. Even in the extraordinary number of cases of fatal attacks by Tigers in India, separating attacks from for territorial reasons has to be separated from those that are the result of predation. I would further add that the likes of National Geographic, and the Discovery Channel usually go to great lengths to point out that when top level predators attack humans as prey, it is usually done by predators who have acquired a taste for human flesh from eating human remains or have been injured or suffer some impairment due to illness.

PS - I was reading National Geographic when is was in black and white, so please...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2012, 04:04 AM
 
Location: Michigan--good on the rocks
2,544 posts, read 3,689,724 times
Reputation: 1943
I think top-level predators don't prefer to hunt other top-level predators generally because there is easier prey. Much less risky to hunt a deer than a wolf or mountain lion, eh?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2012, 07:25 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,317,640 times
Reputation: 12153
Quote:
Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
A pack of humans even with rudimentary weapons was an unrelenting foe.
Yeap and contrary to popular belief ancient stone age humans were indeed very intelligent (they had the exact same size brain as us today) and for example just look at the tools and weapons found at the Sibudu and Blombos caves in South Africa where they've been dated back to 75,000 to 80,000 BCE. One example of their intelligence and technology is that they made powerful bow and arrows as when constructing them they'd usually start off with either basalt or sandstone to fashion the initial crude shape of the bow and then to further refine them down they'd use super sharp Obsidian or Flint and for the bow strings they would usually use long strips of dried rawhide and attach one end to the bow then twist the string super tight to give it powerful tension and so when shot those arrows could kill any animal whether a gazelle, vervet monkee or even an lion.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ovcatto View Post
I also brought up an point about dolphins and killer whales, they to are the big brains of their domain and hunt in well orchestrated packs.
Did you ever see the Nat Geo show about Great White Sharks where one of the boat tourist's with his camera filmed for the first time ever a battle between a Great White and a passing Orca as the Orca destroyed it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2012, 08:19 AM
 
31,372 posts, read 32,935,820 times
Reputation: 14916
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
Did you ever see the Nat Geo show about Great White Sharks where one of the boat tourist's with his camera filmed for the first time ever a battle between a Great White and a passing Orca as the Orca destroyed it.
Nooooo!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top