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Old 08-25-2012, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 9,164,236 times
Reputation: 1632

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Cambridge, Mass. – August 23, 2012 – Applied physicists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have created an ultrathin, flat lens that focuses light without imparting the distortions of conventional lenses.


At a mere 60 nanometers thick, the flat lens is essentially two-dimensional, yet its focusing power approaches the ultimate physical limit set by the laws of diffraction.
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Old 08-25-2012, 09:38 PM
Status: "chickpea soup" (set 29 days ago)
 
18,765 posts, read 56,521,786 times
Reputation: 33182
This could grow into a major game-changer. There is no reason why such lenses can't be interlaced, which would result in a holographic type of imaging* without the lasers. In addition, such lenses being flat means that common objects could be surfaced with the lenses. Imagine a spy with a book or briefcase that actually is a holographic camera.

*True holograms have such a fine grid of detail that when you move while looking at one, the movement is totally smooth. Interlaced lenses would do some trade-offs and be in a coarser grid, maybe as much as a half-centimeter between optical centers.
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Old 08-26-2012, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 9,164,236 times
Reputation: 1632
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
This could grow into a major game-changer. There is no reason why such lenses can't be interlaced, which would result in a holographic type of imaging* without the lasers. In addition, such lenses being flat means that common objects could be surfaced with the lenses. Imagine a spy with a book or briefcase that actually is a holographic camera.

*True holograms have such a fine grid of detail that when you move while looking at one, the movement is totally smooth. Interlaced lenses would do some trade-offs and be in a coarser grid, maybe as much as a half-centimeter between optical centers.
Who knows what all might come from this new technology, and it is obvious how happy these guys are.
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