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Old 10-25-2019, 05:04 PM
 
2,127 posts, read 976,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacInTx View Post
RPG. This mainframe programming language was formatted to work with 80 character punch cards (like those used by NASA programmers to put man on the moon). The language was barely one step above assembler.

I still have my clear plastic scale (ruler) with the longitudinal magnifying glass, used to confirm placement of the language bits in their proper location on the card when we graduated to printing our program code on greenbar. It's a conversation piece, like a slide rule, although there aren't many folks around anymore with whom to hold the conversation.


We debated the basis of the RPG acronym. A co-worker proposed the best option - Run and Play Games. That's the one I remember.
RPG - Report Program Generator. Good RPG programmers can be very productive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Well, in my experience APL was really weird.


Basic was the easiest.
APL was interesting, but very weird.

For me, easiest was SQL, it just makes sense
Hardest was C or Assembler.
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Old 10-25-2019, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Hardest for me: APL and Lisp
Easiest for me: Pascal and Basic
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Old 10-27-2019, 02:07 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
14,230 posts, read 10,229,425 times
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APL was my 'milk tongue'... wrote all sorts of neat stuff ... accounting ... utilities ... financial projections ... back in the 1970s.

It probably explains why I also like Ithkuil.
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Old 10-27-2019, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
Yes, COBOL was like writing a book. Easy to follow, unnecessarily wordy. It is still around.
Good COBOL programmers were at a premium in the late 1990s due to the supposed Y2K meltdown.
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Old 10-27-2019, 11:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
Good COBOL programmers were at a premium in the late 1990s due to the supposed Y2K meltdown.
It wasn't supposed. Overwrought, yes, but not supposed. My employer at the time did tests in 1996 of all of the major systems, and discovered that without remediation, no payments would be made, and the accounting systems would fail. Some of the refinery and chemical plant software was affected as well. They spent about $60 million fixing the issues, and Y2K was then a snooze fest. That was the case for many major companies.
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Old 10-27-2019, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WRM20 View Post
It wasn't supposed. Overwrought, yes, but not supposed. My employer at the time did tests in 1996 of all of the major systems, and discovered that without remediation, no payments would be made, and the accounting systems would fail. Some of the refinery and chemical plant software was affected as well. They spent about $60 million fixing the issues, and Y2K was then a snooze fest. That was the case for many major companies.
Bad choice of words on my part. I was a senior consultant managing system evaluation for Y2K at the time for clients, too. There were problems and they were fixed (I made recommendations for testing one system for which they couldn't find the source code, so it was real black box testing). There were non-techies hoarding food and predicting the end of civilization as we know it at the time: power grids would fail, airplanes would plunge from the skies. I knew people who were getting hysterical about the whole thing at the time and they wouldn't listen to reason.
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Old 10-27-2019, 09:05 PM
 
2,127 posts, read 976,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
Bad choice of words on my part. I was a senior consultant managing system evaluation for Y2K at the time for clients, too. There were problems and they were fixed (I made recommendations for testing one system for which they couldn't find the source code, so it was real black box testing). There were non-techies hoarding food and predicting the end of civilization as we know it at the time: power grids would fail, airplanes would plunge from the skies. I knew people who were getting hysterical about the whole thing at the time and they wouldn't listen to reason.
I never worried about the planes or power stations. Or food. Companies did such a a good job of fixing affected systems that far too many people think it wasn't a big deal.
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Old 10-28-2019, 08:27 AM
 
6,435 posts, read 2,942,782 times
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My favorite Y2K story:


[scary person] "There won't be any water!"
[me] "See that big structure over there?"
"Yes..."
"What is it?"
"It's the water tower, of course."
"What's in it?"
"Water, I suppose."
"How do you think the water gets from there to your house? I'll tell you. It's called "Gravity". Do you REALLY think that GRAVITY is going to stop working at midnight on 1/1/2000?"
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Old 11-01-2019, 08:23 AM
 
Location: The Bubble, Florida
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Assembly was the hardest. I got through one lesson and switched to Basic. (VB hadn't been invented yet, there was no microsoft either, or personal computers). Many years later when I was around 40, I added VB6.0 and C. Found VB to be pretty easy, did well with C also. I surprised myself by understanding pointers and arrays better than any of the college kids in the class.
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Old 11-01-2019, 03:46 PM
 
2,280 posts, read 757,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grad_student200 View Post
I agree C# is unnecessarily difficult because of (1) convoluted namespaces and (2) DLL hell and (3) inherit limitations of being on MS - usually asp.net which is outdated.
C# has surpassed Java with new features. If anything, Java has fallen by the wayside and been replaced with Kotlin on Android and Scala on systems. .NET Core can run on non-Windows operating systems now. .NET Core self-hosting web services are also much closer to a Node application than an ASP.NET application hosted by IIS.

Quote:
Many companies are moving to JavaScript like React or Angular 7.
Single page application JavaScript frameworks complement rather than compete with C#, Java, and Go. Almost no one uses server-side rendering for big web applications now.

Quote:
.Net was new in 2000 but faded by 2013 due to the growth of Java, JavaScript and Python.
.NET and C# are losing market share not because of language features, but because of the increasing sophistication and proliferation of open source ecosystems, namely Node and Python, and because of AWS support for competing platforms.

Quote:
The hardest to learn is C because of the pointer arithmetic (in my opinion).
Pointers and memory management are needlessly difficult such that they were removed/abstracted as features in modern languages. However modern C++ coupled with the STL has largely abstracted memory management and also introduced many useful features found in other languages. It's not as bad as it used to be.

Quote:
The easiest is Python.
For simple applications, yes. For complex applications dynamic typing and poor object-oriented support hinder it. Let the compiler catch bugs for you.

Quote:
But if you want a nightmare, try simulating a Quantum Physics experiment with 1980s Fortran code - lol.
Fortran 77 is the Latin of computer languages: used only by academics long past its sell-by date.
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