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Old 10-24-2019, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Nevadafornia
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For those who learned to code, what are the most and least difficult programming languages to learn?

For me, most difficult: C#
Least difficult: Java, SQL, Javascript
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Old 10-24-2019, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevroqs View Post
For those who learned to code, what are the most and least difficult programming languages to learn?

For me, most difficult: C#
Least difficult: Java, SQL, Javascript
I agree C# is unnecessarily difficult because of (1) convoluted namespaces and (2) DLL hell and (3) inherit limitations of being on MS - usually asp.net which is outdated. Many companies are moving to JavaScript like React or Angular 7. .Net was new in 2000 but faded by 2013 due to the growth of Java, JavaScript and Python. There are now also mobile apps using Swift, Android, etc.

The hardest to learn is C because of the pointer arithmetic (in my opinion). The easiest is Python. Java is in the middle. It's not uncommon for an old legacy C system to be too-hard-to-debug for a new programmer such that the retired author has to be called back.

But if you want a nightmare, try simulating a Quantum Physics experiment with 1980s Fortran code - lol.
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Old 10-24-2019, 08:42 PM
 
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RPG. This mainframe programming language was formatted to work with 80 character punch cards (like those used by NASA programmers to put man on the moon). The language was barely one step above assembler.

I still have my clear plastic scale (ruler) with the longitudinal magnifying glass, used to confirm placement of the language bits in their proper location on the card when we graduated to printing our program code on greenbar. It's a conversation piece, like a slide rule, although there aren't many folks around anymore with whom to hold the conversation.


We debated the basis of the RPG acronym. A co-worker proposed the best option - Run and Play Games. That's the one I remember.
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Old 10-25-2019, 05:29 AM
 
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Well, in my experience APL was really weird.


Basic was the easiest.
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Old 10-25-2019, 09:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grad_student200 View Post
But if you want a nightmare, try simulating a Quantum Physics experiment with 1980s Fortran code - lol.
I can match this one -

In the 80's I had to write a word processor application in COBOL. You practically needed a word processor just to write the code.

But overall "hardest" language for me to learn was probably TI-99/4A Assembly due to the limited memory, and how to handle manipulating registers.

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Old 10-25-2019, 10:43 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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In my experience and I'm old, the most difficult was IBM 370 Assembly language. Used on mainframes, there was a corresponding PC version of it which I also delved in. Never used it for anything practical, only classroom and exercises.

C++ was the version I picked up, it came on the scene in the early 80's. Nowhere near as difficult as assembly. You actually had words to work with.

My coding days are over. I still do use Visual Foxpro (discontinued) and SQL at my company. SQL is powerful for what it was designed for and I studied it in college, still use it to this day.

Yes, COBOL was like writing a book. Easy to follow, unnecessarily wordy. It is still around.
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Old 10-25-2019, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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For me, vanilla 'C' code is pretty easy to pick up. It's beautifully clean and logical. As mentioned above, the pointer logic is the most difficult aspect.

I think C++ is more difficult because of all the special features (like lambda). Java is easier that way, and it takes care of the garbage collection for you.

Assembly code can be a beast, but you'll learn a lot about how computers actually work.
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Old 10-25-2019, 02:47 PM
 
Location: NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
Assembly code can be a beast, but you'll learn a lot about how computers actually work.
6502 assembly was something else... "C" is a not bad and most code today is still in C even though the last few years Python has been all the rage.
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Old 10-25-2019, 02:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tripleh View Post
6502 assembly was something else... "C" is a not bad and most code today is still in C even though the last few years Python has been all the rage.
Ugh, 6502. 2 registers and an accumulator. Not fun.
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Old 10-25-2019, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
13,114 posts, read 13,161,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevroqs View Post
For those who learned to code, what are the most and least difficult programming languages to learn?

For me, most difficult: C#
Least difficult: Java, SQL, Javascript
Hardest: Assembly language
Easiest: Any database query. SQL is a good example.
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