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Old 12-12-2019, 12:49 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,458 posts, read 18,492,544 times
Reputation: 11977

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My son who is turning 14 in a few months is a science nerd.

3 years ago I bought him his first microscope
My First Lab Duo-Scope Microscope - MFL-06

This year I want to give him and upgrade.
I was thinking of buying this one on Amazon.
AmScope B120C-E1 Siedentopf Binocular Compound Microscope

But there are a lot of options and I don't know what the difference is between this one and other microscopes. I like the camera feature. But the reviews telling me the camera in not very good.

Anyways. If you have any recommendations please tell me.

Thank you.

My budget is up to 300 dollars. Not a lot but enough for my son for now.

Thanks
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Old 12-12-2019, 01:20 PM
 
6,410 posts, read 2,935,943 times
Reputation: 18231
Depends on what you want to do with it.

Biological specimens you generally need bottom lighting and a stage for glass slides. Mechanical specimens you generally want top lighting and you're not using glass slides. Binocular is great for mechanical inspection at moderate magnifications but just gets in the way at high magnifications.

I'd look at Edmunds Scientific.

If he's interested in a wide range of things you might consider a different type of scope than what he's got now.

Also consider whether there would be a desire for measuring things under the scope.
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Old 12-12-2019, 02:53 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,458 posts, read 18,492,544 times
Reputation: 11977
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Depends on what you want to do with it.

Biological specimens you generally need bottom lighting and a stage for glass slides. Mechanical specimens you generally want top lighting and you're not using glass slides. Binocular is great for mechanical inspection at moderate magnifications but just gets in the way at high magnifications.

I'd look at Edmunds Scientific.

If he's interested in a wide range of things you might consider a different type of scope than what he's got now.

Also consider whether there would be a desire for measuring things under the scope.
He likes to look at biological specimens. I think he would love to look at them in cellular levels
And levels of mitosis etc.

Would this scope be good you think

AmScope B120C-E1 Siedentopf Binocular Compound Microscope
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Old 12-13-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Maryland
2,280 posts, read 783,989 times
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The Siedentopf design allows for change in the inter-pupillary distance without having to change the eyepiece focus once they have been adjusted for a particular user. If the microscope is only to be used by one person, there is no need to keep changing the inter-pupillary distance (distance between your eyes). Therefore a Jentsch design would be fine also.

With the Jentsch design, the individual eyepieces slide away from each other in a straight line, instead of rotating in an arc, as they are moved apart. Therefore, since each eyepiece is changing its distance from the common optical axis, the eyepieces must be refocused. Again, since it’s a single user, this might not be an issue since it could be set and forget for one user.

If your use of the microscope demands an eyepiece reticle for measuring or orientation purposes, a Jentsch binocular tube design becomes preferable because, since the eyepieces move apart or together in a straight line, the reticule does not change orientation. In a Siedentopf design, the eyepieces swing through an arc and therefore any reticle in the eyepiece rotates as the distance is changed. Again, however, for a single user, not a big issue. One type of Jentsch tube (mechanically more complex and expensive) accomplishes it all and is popular on laboratory research microscopes for multiple users. In this design, as you move the eyepieces together or apart, you can see their mount sliding into and out of the binocular tube, this maintains microscope tube length and reticle orientation, despite their distance from the optical axis changing.

You might look into used microscopes as well. Universities, especially medical schools, are cycling though hundreds of microscopes now and then as they update their student microscopes. I bought a pretty nice Leitz (now Leica) one that way.

I hope the above about Siedentopf and Jentsch design was clear. As I said, for a single user, either one would work well, even with an eyepiece reticle. The only other option that I would consider as desirable is an adjustable condenser that permits achieving true Koehler Illumination (see video)


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5MfZweoJ6A8

If you are interested in an interactive, almost encyclopedic site on microscopy, check out this link. Your son might enjoy it.

https://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/
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Old 12-13-2019, 06:29 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,458 posts, read 18,492,544 times
Reputation: 11977
Quote:
Originally Posted by LesLucid View Post
The Siedentopf design allows for change in the inter-pupillary distance without having to change the eyepiece focus once they have been adjusted for a particular user. If the microscope is only to be used by one person, there is no need to keep changing the inter-pupillary distance (distance between your eyes). Therefore a Jentsch design would be fine also.

With the Jentsch design, the individual eyepieces slide away from each other in a straight line, instead of rotating in an arc, as they are moved apart. Therefore, since each eyepiece is changing its distance from the common optical axis, the eyepieces must be refocused. Again, since it’s a single user, this might not be an issue since it could be set and forget for one user.

If your use of the microscope demands an eyepiece reticle for measuring or orientation purposes, a Jentsch binocular tube design becomes preferable because, since the eyepieces move apart or together in a straight line, the reticule does not change orientation. In a Siedentopf design, the eyepieces swing through an arc and therefore any reticle in the eyepiece rotates as the distance is changed. Again, however, for a single user, not a big issue. One type of Jentsch tube (mechanically more complex and expensive) accomplishes it all and is popular on laboratory research microscopes for multiple users. In this design, as you move the eyepieces together or apart, you can see their mount sliding into and out of the binocular tube, this maintains microscope tube length and reticle orientation, despite their distance from the optical axis changing.

You might look into used microscopes as well. Universities, especially medical schools, are cycling though hundreds of microscopes now and then as they update their student microscopes. I bought a pretty nice Leitz (now Leica) one that way.

I hope the above about Siedentopf and Jentsch design was clear. As I said, for a single user, either one would work well, even with an eyepiece reticle. The only other option that I would consider as desirable is an adjustable condenser that permits achieving true Koehler Illumination (see video)


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5MfZweoJ6A8

If you are interested in an interactive, almost encyclopedic site on microscopy, check out this link. Your son might enjoy it.

https://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/
Thank you soo much for taking your
our time answering me. I really appreciate it.

I ended up getting this one below. It was a little more than 300 . My son will be the only one using it. Well. Me too maybe. It has a camera attached and I guess I can upgrade it if I want to.
Attached Thumbnails
I need advice on what Microscope to buy-screenshot_20191213-181402_amazon-shopping.jpg  
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