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Old 05-10-2020, 05:14 PM
 
3,005 posts, read 3,967,348 times
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I know this could fit in several different forums, but since this deals with the science of infection:

Being here in NYC, when I think about all the confined spaces that we're in (elevators, subways, restaurants, etc), one thing has been running through my mind:

What is the link between proper ventilation and airborne disease? Just as back in the 1800s, our "war" against disease was solved more by proper sanitation practices and providing clean drinking water than "cures" for various bacteria, is the answer to this crisis more in focusing on making the air in indoor spaces cleaner via air movement? I wonder if for example subway cars had fans directed to pull air up and out of the car like a vacuum it would suck our respiration (and thus infection) out of the confined space and reduce viral load. No, I get that if someone is right next to me it probably won't do much good, but at least it would help not get the whole car infected.

What is the science on this?
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Old 05-10-2020, 05:38 PM
 
1,985 posts, read 503,478 times
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The evidence is that the disease is transmitted via droplets (and micro-droplets) of moisture from an infected individual. The biggest risk is from a sneeze or cough creating hundreds of thousands of such droplets, not all of which are heavy enough to immediately sink out of the air. But heavy breathing may be enough to produce such an aerosol, and in close confines, it could be enough to transmit the virus.

Hence masks being the primary form of defense. If droplets more or less can't escape from you, they can't affect anyone else. If you're protected against breathing in any droplets, you're much safer. Masks don't necessarily need to be N95 or fine enough to stop the virus itself, just any droplet of moisture or aerosol large enough to be a vector.

The evidence is good that a decent mask AND washing all exposed skin, especially hands, as soon as you can after public exposure is very effective. Not 100%, no. But probably good enough, on a cooperative and herd basis, to keep this virus from propagating any further, any faster, and any longer than it has to.
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Old 05-10-2020, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Seattle
5,910 posts, read 1,387,135 times
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Poor ventilation allows aerosols to spread further without significant dispersal. It has been measured propagating out to fifteen feet. Six feet is probably just a reasonable compromise that lowers the R-naught sufficiently. But being outdoors in the Sun and wind is likely a good thing.
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Old 05-11-2020, 09:45 AM
 
982 posts, read 1,345,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shizzles View Post
I know this could fit in several different forums, but since this deals with the science of infection:

Being here in NYC, when I think about all the confined spaces that we're in (elevators, subways, restaurants, etc), one thing has been running through my mind:

What is the link between proper ventilation and airborne disease? Just as back in the 1800s, our "war" against disease was solved more by proper sanitation practices and providing clean drinking water than "cures" for various bacteria, is the answer to this crisis more in focusing on making the air in indoor spaces cleaner via air movement? I wonder if for example subway cars had fans directed to pull air up and out of the car like a vacuum it would suck our respiration (and thus infection) out of the confined space and reduce viral load. No, I get that if someone is right next to me it probably won't do much good, but at least it would help not get the whole car infected.

What is the science on this?

while not a perfect article, it is worthwhile reading

https://www.erinbromage.com/post/the...hem-avoid-them


in general, long duration in enclosed spaces = not good


infection = duration x dosage




.
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