Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Seattle area
 [Register]
Seattle area Seattle and King County Suburbs
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-01-2011, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Glendale, AZ
7 posts, read 20,754 times
Reputation: 14

Advertisements

This thread is the reverse of several I have read on here. Basically, Seattle is one of the areas I am looking at (job related) for relocation. I am fairly conservative, politically and socially, but I get along fine with people of other viewpoints. For the most part, I really could care less. I'm happy to share my thoughts but don't share unsolicited.

I'm not thin-skinned, and even if the environment were "hostile" it wouldn't be enough to make me scratch WA off my list of potentials. I just figured I'd see what the general attitude toward one like myself might be.

BTW, born and raised (reared, if you want to be technically correct) and currently residing in South Carolina. I am in my mid-twenties and will be completing a Masters degree in May.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-01-2011, 09:45 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, 615' Elevation, Zone 8b - originally from SF Bay Area
44,551 posts, read 81,085,957 times
Reputation: 57744
In general Seattle and all of King County are considered liberal. Still, there are pockets of conservatives in certain areas, such as Sammamish.
There was even an all conservative Seattle talk radio station until recently, when they went to oldies music.

I have been here 18 years and have not experienced any problems with
political views clashing in normal life. Most people keep their politics to themselves except at election time or organized events.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2011, 09:48 AM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,002 posts, read 12,354,936 times
Reputation: 4125
"I'm happy to share my thoughts but don't share unsolicited."

If that is true, and if it is true then you will get along well here. Heck, I was sharing with a friend of mine who moved out here and in a very crowded place I mentioned that I thought abortion was killing a human, and therefore should be illegal in all cases, and nobody even turned their head.

That was a slip up because almost nobody discusses politics openly here. Almost nobody... mention the viaduct or one of a few sore points (parking rates, the viaduct ... the viaduct again, did I mention the viaduct?) and you'll probably get unsolicited feedbdack. So, basic rule of thumb follows your ethos: don't share openly, and share only when solicited and then with humbleness.


If it's also true that you're "not thin-skinned" then you'll do fine as well. Reading the weeklies like Seattle Weekly will have a TON of ultra-left but insightful reading, and if you tire of that, then you can feast your eyes on the plethora of advertising and articles on the arts scene around here.

I think in general if a person moves here and keeps an open mind, they will do well, and I think that's a truism no matter where you go. Do as the Romans do, but hold your personal beliefs unless you decide to change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2011, 10:28 AM
 
21,989 posts, read 15,702,895 times
Reputation: 12943
Eskercurve, I think you hit the nail on the head with the word "humbleness". While I'm liberal, I keep my opinions to myself unless asked and in a work environment, say nothing. If someone of an opposing view became confrontational about their politics, I would be offended even if I said nothing. I think a defining characteristic of Seattleites is an innate desire to avoid confrontation. It can lead to being passive-aggressive sometimes and can be viewed as introverted too, but humbleness is always well-received.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2011, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Glendale, AZ
7 posts, read 20,754 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
"I'm happy to share my thoughts but don't share unsolicited."

If that is true, and if it is true then you will get along well here. Heck, I was sharing with a friend of mine who moved out here and in a very crowded place I mentioned that I thought abortion was killing a human, and therefore should be illegal in all cases, and nobody even turned their head.

That was a slip up because almost nobody discusses politics openly here. Almost nobody... mention the viaduct or one of a few sore points (parking rates, the viaduct ... the viaduct again, did I mention the viaduct?) and you'll probably get unsolicited feedbdack. So, basic rule of thumb follows your ethos: don't share openly, and share only when solicited and then with humbleness.


If it's also true that you're "not thin-skinned" then you'll do fine as well. Reading the weeklies like Seattle Weekly will have a TON of ultra-left but insightful reading, and if you tire of that, then you can feast your eyes on the plethora of advertising and articles on the arts scene around here.

I think in general if a person moves here and keeps an open mind, they will do well, and I think that's a truism no matter where you go. Do as the Romans do, but hold your personal beliefs unless you decide to change.
Great to hear. I really love hearing other viewpoints because I think it is part of being a well-informed, thinking person. Most opposing viewpoints still have good points as long as they are thought out and backed up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seacove View Post
Eskercurve, I think you hit the nail on the head with the word "humbleness". While I'm liberal, I keep my opinions to myself unless asked and in a work environment, say nothing. If someone of an opposing view became confrontational about their politics, I would be offended even if I said nothing. I think a defining characteristic of Seattleites is an innate desire to avoid confrontation. It can lead to being passive-aggressive sometimes and can be viewed as introverted too, but humbleness is always well-received.
I have found myself highly irritated with individuals with whom I agree - I really think much of it has to do with the approach. Thanks for the feedback, both of these posts are encouraging. Glad to know that the West Coasters would still be willing to be my friend
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2011, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,011 posts, read 3,550,880 times
Reputation: 2748
I'm just to the right of center and that was a concern of mine as well. I have not relocated there yet, and am not 100% sure I will. BUT, nothing has led me to believe Seattle is an extremist haven. I could care less if I'm amongst moderates of either party. If you look at election results you will see that Republicans still command well over a third of the vote. That's still a sound minority, but does indicate you will hardly be alone. Which neighborhood you settle into will determine a lot. But yeah, it's a concern of mine as well. It's part of my homework and on my mind when I visit. I'm narrowing down to Magnolia, Mercer Island, or elsewhere on the East Side though. Don't think I'll encounter any extremism there. In fact, Seattle doesn't strike me as extremist at all. Might be why it just seems to fit me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2011, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Free From The Oppressive State
30,251 posts, read 23,719,256 times
Reputation: 38626
For the most part, what has been said is true. I lived in Seattle for 13 years and for the most part, people didn't want to talk politics until it was election time and then, boy did some people go overboard.

I'm also conservative and I was held personally responsible by some of my co-workers for Al Gore's loss. That doesn't sit well with me because I don't attack others view points like that.

Another time, I was at a house warming party and for some reason, I have no idea why, someone who barely knew me decided to tell everyone at the party that I voted Republican.

Next thing I knew, some snotty "little girl" started harassing me about it. I told her it was not the time nor place to discuss politics. We were at a party, and to respect the host. She refused to let up. I eventually shot down her misconceptions about a few things and walked away from her.

One of her friends also started talking to me about politics but she was WAY nicer about it and willing to have an open mind. Because of that, we sat a little away from people and shared our ideas and opinions.

That's the norm. The snotty little girl and heated co-workers who voted for Al Gore....that's not the norm.

In general, you'll find people are more liberal just in what they do. People care about the environment, (which so do conservatives), and they recycle a lot!!! which I agree with, (and I know some of my fellow conservatives do not), you may see some rallies from time to time, sign carriers and the like but as someone earlier said, most people in Seattle seem to try to avoid confrontation at all costs.

Sometimes that can be a bit annoying but for the most part, it makes for more pleasantness.

The area? GORGEOUS!!!!! You won't regret it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 08:47 AM
 
14 posts, read 37,837 times
Reputation: 14
I think it comes down to the maturity level of the people you associate with. I'm a liberal with many liberal friends and associates, but I do count conservatives among my friends and associates (though admittedly they are socially liberal) as well, and have socialized in mixed groups often. My general rule is I don't discuss politics or religion except among close friends and family, but sometimes I will if asked as long as it's done respectfully and with maturity (though I never will in the work place). If I feel the conversation is heading toward becoming aggressive, I will attempt to end it or step away. It's not that I shy away from confrontation so much as I get turned off and lose respect for them (no matter their political persuasion).

Unfortunately, I think many people are succumbing to an increasingly hostile and devisive media and political machine, and perhaps our talk-show culture where we've been trained to wear all of our beliefs, emotions and personal problems on our sleeve. We live in a very complex world that's far from black and white and it's understandable that there is a large spectrum of beliefs from one end to the other. It is actually ok to agree to disagree.

I'm living out of the country at the moment, but if I return to the US it would likely be to Seattle, which is where I lived before I left. There is a great quality of life there, both in the city and outside of it (if you're active and like the outdoors). Politically, in my experience anyway, most people keep their politics to themselves. You could call it a left leaning city, but not far left and not exclusively left. Which is good. It keeps debate alive which is healthy - or can be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 12:50 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 9,975,080 times
Reputation: 3491
I has less to do with the people around and you and more to do with your own attitude. If you're a fiscal conservative/libertarian, no one will have issues.

As long as your okay with gay people, considering that Seattle has a huge GLBT community and people who aren't gay have at least one close friend who's gay, and as long as you're not a religious fanatic, as Seattle has a massive atheist population, you'll do fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,011 posts, read 3,550,880 times
Reputation: 2748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaard View Post
.....I'm a liberal with many liberal friends and associates, but I do count conservatives among my friends and associates (though admittedly they are socially liberal) as well, and have socialized in mixed groups often....
I think most people have close friends and acquaintances across the political spectrum. That can get lost on people sometimes, especially in forums like these where the extremes tend to get exaggerated and receive more attention than they deserve. You sound like the definition of the typical and normal person; not just in Seattle, but anywhere. Anyone that would avoid socializing with someone of a different political orientation is the exception, not the norm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Seattle area

All times are GMT -6.

¬© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top