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Old 09-08-2011, 05:02 PM
 
579 posts, read 1,130,607 times
Reputation: 402

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I notice that people park right up to where my driveway begins and ends on either side (very narrow one car garage that truly doesn't fit our vehicle). Our house is near a business and a school but mostly residential neighborhood. I dread school time starting because when I leave to see my kids off to school, I come back to a packed street that stays this way till school lets out. It's not like this in the summer as I don't leave early enough to free up my spot, and school is out of session so others aren't vying for the spot. During the school year I end up parking streets away while the high school kids and people patronizing the business park in front of my house, and so close together I couldn't pull into my driveway if I wanted to. I know this is nothing unique at all, as I've seen this all over Ballard, Queen Ann, and other neighborhoods where parking is prized. Has anyone gone to the effort to painting the five feet on either side of their driveway as the code and picture show below? What have your results been?

"Seattle Municipal Code 11.72.110 - Driveway or alley entrance

"No person shall stand or park a vehicle in front of a public or private driveway within a street or alley or in front of or in an alley entrance or within five feet (5') of the end of a constructed driveway return or alley entrance return, or if none, within five feet (5') of the projection of the edge of the driveway or alley."

Seattle Municipal Code 11.72.120 - Driveway - Painted curb

"The prohibited area for driveway returns described in Section 11.72.110 may be maintained with traffic yellow paint by the property owner or occupant."





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Old 09-08-2011, 05:51 PM
 
1,632 posts, read 3,594,119 times
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I've seen people do this, but it doesn't necessarily mean the parkers will pay any attention. With or without the paint, they will still think they can park anywhere as long as they don't block your driveway.
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Old 09-08-2011, 08:13 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
35,909 posts, read 65,364,080 times
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The police do not have the time, money or desire to start enforcing that. The paint might deter a few people but someone else would end up parking there and the time/money would be wasted. It's just part of living in the city. Be grateful that you are in an area where you can park in front of your own house, some cannot. If you can get together with a bunch of other people and make a presentation at a city council meeting, you may get them to make it a resident parking only zone where you need a permit in the car. That usually won't work when there's commercial nearby.

SDOT - Restricted Parking Zone Program (RPZ)
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Old 09-08-2011, 08:23 PM
 
7,747 posts, read 14,576,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
If you can get together with a bunch of other people and make a presentation at a city council meeting, you may get them to make it a resident parking only zone where you need a permit in the car. That usually won't work when there's commercial nearby.

SDOT - Restricted Parking Zone Program (RPZ)
This is probably the best suggestion here. Paint is a pretty oblivious deterrent, especially given that there's no one likely to enforce it.
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Old 09-08-2011, 09:39 PM
 
579 posts, read 1,130,607 times
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Thanks guys. Live and learn. I'm renting but the landlord is all for it. Doesn't sound like it's worth the hassel, but I have seen those residential only parking signs and always wondered how they got them. I know when I'm buying in the next few years I'll purposefully pick a house with a wider set back driveway and more parking.
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Old 09-09-2011, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Capital Hill
1,600 posts, read 2,923,457 times
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There are lots of residential parking rules but 'parking enforcement' is too busy and there are not enough parking enforcement personnel to enforce them.
What you can do if you are annoid is to call Seattle Parking Enforcement and complain. They will send out a parking enforcement agent to look at what you are complaining about, and if the parked car is indeed parked against the rules, they will put a ticket on his/her windshield.
We do this all the time. We have a parking problem on our neighborhood block. People outside our neighborhood leave their car parked in front of our house and leave it for an indefenite period of time. The muninciple rule states that cars cannot be parked in a residential street more then 24 hours. Of course this rule is ignored if you park your own car in front of your house and parking enforcement does not enforce this rule. But, if any other car is parked in front of our house more then 24 hours, we call parking enforcement and they are quick to come out and put a warning sticker on it's windshield that it's about to be towed away.
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Old 09-09-2011, 10:06 AM
 
579 posts, read 1,130,607 times
Reputation: 402
Quote:
There are lots of residential parking rules but 'parking enforcement' is too busy and there are not enough parking enforcement personnel to enforce them.
What you can do if you are annoid is to call Seattle Parking Enforcement and complain. They will send out a parking enforcement agent to look at what you are complaining about, and if the parked car is indeed parked against the rules, they will put a ticket on his/her windshield.
We do this all the time. We have a parking problem on our neighborhood block. People outside our neighborhood leave their car parked in front of our house and leave it for an indefenite period of time. The muninciple rule states that cars cannot be parked in a residential street more then 24 hours. Of course this rule is ignored if you park your own car in front of your house and parking enforcement does not enforce this rule. But, if any other car is parked in front of our house more then 24 hours, we call parking enforcement and they are quick to come out and put a warning sticker on it's windshield that it's about to be towed away.
Good idea, thanks!
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Old 09-09-2011, 04:51 PM
 
1,632 posts, read 3,594,119 times
Reputation: 1110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinylly View Post
Of course this rule is ignored if you park your own car in front of your house and parking enforcement does not enforce this rule.

Not quite true - our daughter's car was parked in front of our house for a week while away on a trip and we got one of those nice little stickers you speak of.
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Old 09-09-2011, 08:46 PM
 
3,117 posts, read 4,219,814 times
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If a meter maid sees someone do that, they'll get a $42 ticket for parking within 5 feet of an alley or driveway. If you specifically call to complain while a person is parked that way, they'll tow the vehicle.
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Old 09-10-2011, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,317 posts, read 7,309,385 times
Reputation: 1734
Quote:
Originally Posted by happyhunting View Post
Thanks guys. Live and learn. I'm renting but the landlord is all for it. Doesn't sound like it's worth the hassel, but I have seen those residential only parking signs and always wondered how they got them. I know when I'm buying in the next few years I'll purposefully pick a house with a wider set back driveway and more parking.
Speaking of resident permit parking only zones... I need to pay my ticket for inadvertently parking in one of those zones without a permit last time I was in Seattle. At least in Portland they offer visitors a window of time where they can park in an area (usually an hour or two, depending) before they're going to get in trouble. I mean, if I had been visiting a resident there I would have contested the ticket, but it was my own stupid fault for not noticing the signs. I think that ticket goes for $60-something.
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