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Old 03-08-2011, 09:14 AM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
20,460 posts, read 26,343,211 times
Reputation: 7627

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Quote:
Originally Posted by martyogelvie View Post
I moved to Seattle (years ago) in October. I did not see Mt Rainier until April (HONEST). I communted into Seattle on i90 everday for 6 plus months and then suddenly, just like it grew up over night, there was Mt Rainier.. "Where did that come from?"...
Yeah, on a clear day the Mountain (no one in Seattle needs you to explain which mountain you are talking about when your say "the Mountain") looks like you could reach out & touch it - and the dang thing is 60 MILES AWAY!!!!!

As dominant as it is when the skies are clear it is indeed amazing how it can just VANISH during all that cloudy weather we get in the winter.

Ken
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Old 03-08-2011, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,011 posts, read 3,554,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by martyogelvie View Post
I moved to Seattle (years ago) in October. I did not see Mt Rainier until April (HONEST). I communted into Seattle on i90 everday for 6 plus months and then suddenly, just like it grew up over night, there was Mt Rainier.. "Where did that come from?"...
OK, this is exactly what I mean when I say people take something that is already bad and make it sound worse than it really is.

Look, you threw in "HONEST" so I won't question whether or not you saw Rainier. You said you didn't, you said "honest", so I believe you

HOWEVER, there is no year in the history of Seattle where there we no sunny or at least mostly sunny days between October and April. OK, I've only looked back to 2003. But I think my statement is accurate.

Maybe you were holed up at work each and every time the sun came out. Maybe you like to wear really dark sunglasses when the sun does appear and only spotted Rainier when your sunglasses fell off...
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Old 03-08-2011, 12:06 PM
 
73,048 posts, read 62,657,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarawayDJ View Post
OK, this is exactly what I mean when I say people take something that is already bad and make it sound worse than it really is.

Look, you threw in "HONEST" so I won't question whether or not you saw Rainier. You said you didn't, you said "honest", so I believe you

HOWEVER, there is no year in the history of Seattle where there we no sunny or at least mostly sunny days between October and April. OK, I've only looked back to 2003. But I think my statement is accurate.

Maybe you were holed up at work each and every time the sun came out. Maybe you like to wear really dark sunglasses when the sun does appear and only spotted Rainier when your sunglasses fell off...
It also might depend on where he was. From what I have been told, Seattle's location is near some kind of drift zone. It might be overcast in one place and sunny in another.
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Old 03-08-2011, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,011 posts, read 3,554,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
It also might depend on where he was. From what I have been told, Seattle's location is near some kind of drift zone. It might be overcast in one place and sunny in another.
I think you might be referring the the Puget Sound Convergence Zone, a little north of Seattle. That said, I do not believe any residents up there have ever gone from October to April without at least a handful of sunny days that lit up the whole area. Now, what I just said hardly paints a picture of beautiful weather. Just saying that the data out there suggests it isn't THAT bad...where you actually go 5-6 months without any clear or mostly sunny days. They are infrequent, but they do occur.
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Old 03-08-2011, 02:49 PM
 
73,048 posts, read 62,657,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarawayDJ View Post
I think you might be referring the the Puget Sound Convergence Zone, a little north of Seattle. That said, I do not believe any residents up there have ever gone from October to April without at least a handful of sunny days that lit up the whole area. Now, what I just said hardly paints a picture of beautiful weather. Just saying that the data out there suggests it isn't THAT bad...where you actually go 5-6 months without any clear or mostly sunny days. They are infrequent, but they do occur.
I think I know what you're talking about. I lived in Everett, probably around that convergence zone.
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:07 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
20,460 posts, read 26,343,211 times
Reputation: 7627
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarawayDJ View Post
OK, this is exactly what I mean when I say people take something that is already bad and make it sound worse than it really is.

Look, you threw in "HONEST" so I won't question whether or not you saw Rainier. You said you didn't, you said "honest", so I believe you

HOWEVER, there is no year in the history of Seattle where there we no sunny or at least mostly sunny days between October and April. OK, I've only looked back to 2003. But I think my statement is accurate.

Maybe you were holed up at work each and every time the sun came out. Maybe you like to wear really dark sunglasses when the sun does appear and only spotted Rainier when your sunglasses fell off...
Well, I've no doubt that poster was exaggerating a bit - but the "spirit" of the post was dead-on, even if the "letter" of the post was not. The fact is, there can and ARE long periods of time during the winter when the Mountain is just not visible at all - and this is sometimes true even when it's sunny in Seattle. For one thing, it may be sunny, but with a lot of moisture in the water-logged soil there can be a LOT of haze. When the haze is thin it can be pretty sunny out but something 60 miles away can STILL be obscured. For another thing even when it's sunny in Seattle it CAN still be cloudy over Rainier. The thing you have to understand is that REALLY BIG mountains - and there is not really ANY single mountain in the lower 48 that's a bigger single chunk (from base to peak) than Rainier - make their OWN weather - and this is PARTICULARLY true of Rainier because it holds so very much ice & snow (Rainier has more glacier ice than any peak in the lower 48 - and in fact more such ice than ALL the other Cascade volcanos COMBINED). The truth is, Rainier is like an enormous ice box and all that cold ice causes condensation around it so that often there's clouds around or over Rainier when Seattle is clear.

Just some things to remember. Rainier is in many ways in a league of it's own when discussing mountains - it's that big.

Ken
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:08 PM
 
73,048 posts, read 62,657,702 times
Reputation: 21943
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Well, I've no doubt that poster was exaggerating a bit - but the "spirit" of the post was dead-on, even if the "letter" of the post was not. The fact is, there can and ARE long periods of time during the winter when the Mountain is just not visible at all - and this is sometimes true even when it's sunny in Seattle. For one thing, it may be sunny, but with a lot of moisture in the water-logged soil there can be a LOT of haze. When the haze is thin it can be pretty sunny out but something 60 miles away can STILL be obscured. For another thing even when it's sunny in Seattle it CAN still be cloudy over Rainier. The thing you have to understand is that REALLY BIG mountains - and there is not really ANY single mountain in the lower 48 that's a bigger single chunk (from base to peak) than Rainier - make their OWN weather - and this is PARTICULARLY true of Rainier because it holds so very much ice & snow (Rainier has more glacier ice than any peak in the lower 48 - and in fact more such ice than ALL the other Cascade volcanos COMBINED). The truth is, Rainier is like an enormous ice box and all that cold ice causes condensation around it so that often there's clouds around or over Rainier when Seattle is clear.

Just some things to remember. Rainier is in many ways in a league of it's own when discussing mountains - it's that big.

Ken
Sounds similar to Mt. McKinley in Alaska.
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:12 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
20,460 posts, read 26,343,211 times
Reputation: 7627
Quote:
Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
Sounds similar to Mt. McKinley in Alaska.
Yeah, I'd say that's a pretty apt comparison.
Rainier DOMINATES the Cascades & is a GIANT compared to those other mountians around it.

Ken
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,011 posts, read 3,554,081 times
Reputation: 2748
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Well, I've no doubt that poster was exaggerating a bit - but the "spirit" of the post was dead-on, even if the "letter" of the post was not. The fact is, there can and ARE long periods of time during the winter when the Mountain is just not visible at all - and this is sometimes true even when it's sunny in Seattle. For one thing, it may be sunny, but with a lot of moisture in the water-logged soil there can be a LOT of haze. When the haze is thin it can be pretty sunny out but something 60 miles away can STILL be obscured. For another thing even when it's sunny in Seattle it CAN still be cloudy over Rainier. The thing you have to understand is that REALLY BIG mountains - and there is not really ANY single mountain in the lower 48 that's a bigger single chunk (from base to peak) than Rainier - make their OWN weather - and this is PARTICULARLY true of Rainier because it holds so very much ice & snow (Rainier has more glacier ice than any peak in the lower 48 - and in fact more such ice than ALL the other Cascade volcanos COMBINED). The truth is, Rainier is like an enormous ice box and all that cold ice causes condensation around it so that often there's clouds around or over Rainier when Seattle is clear.

Just some things to remember. Rainier is in many ways in a league of it's own when discussing mountains - it's that big.

Ken
No argument from me here. I was only pointing out what I believe was a "slight" exaggeration. These little exaggerations all add up to paint an overly bleak picture that makes it even harder to convince a certain spouse to consider the area. Yes, my interests are self-serving.

Taking into account haze and mountain weather, I'm quite certain that if I planted myself on this nice little bench I found in Magnolia not a single winter would go by where I did not see Rainier a few times. But yes, I'm sure the spirit of what was said is correct.
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:34 PM
 
245 posts, read 708,908 times
Reputation: 81
Okay - Just for comparison, here are a few snaps taken in the Midwest yesterday. Gray ceiling, gloomy except it was 25F outside ... And that little blip you see in the sky is the sun

One might easily mistake these snaps for Seattle .. but the flat landscape kinda gives it away eh ? So, what's my point ? You would think there would be a point - Well, not really !!
Attached Thumbnails
Seattle Weather/Climate Thread-img00122-20110307-1658.jpg   Seattle Weather/Climate Thread-img00123-20110307-1658.jpg   Seattle Weather/Climate Thread-img00124-20110307-1711.jpg   Seattle Weather/Climate Thread-img00125-20110307-1711.jpg  
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