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Old 07-19-2013, 11:59 AM
 
Location: West of the Rockies
1,111 posts, read 2,331,316 times
Reputation: 1144

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It was a big risk for me, as I came out w/o a job and could only go based off what I read online and h3ard from others. The first and foremost factor was the better climate than where im from in the Midwest. After that, it was a combo of job prospects and better social life for people my age (24). If I was only concerned about jobs, I wouldve moved to wash, d.c. (my background and education is in foreign affairs and intl relations) but I hate D.C. and the East Coast. If I was only concerned with social life, I wouldve moved to southern california or phoenix. I was hoping seattle would be a happy medium between the two. The result? I am a little disappointed and its turned out to be a lot harder, both jobwise and socially. BUT I still have a better life here than I did in the midwest. Not the best job but better than whats available back home, still better opportunities for socializing, and I constantly say grace everyday for this mild weather. Sometimes I wish more young people would hang out in Seattle though. One big shock for me was how old the demographic is here. I still feel like this city caters to retirees more than younger people. I mean, there is a visible younger crowd here (mostly in capitol hill) but they are generally not the type similar to me. But oh well, you cant always have it all.
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Old 07-20-2013, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Issaquah WA
217 posts, read 411,359 times
Reputation: 200
we moved here from Charlotte NC a year ago Monday. SO had spent his first 31 years in NYC - I've lived there, 8 yrs in Charlotte, Nashville, Atlanta, and the boonies of SC. We set out to find someplace we actually wanted to live instead of happening to end up there, as we would if we transferred for a job or such. we researched all over the country, took a couple of trips, and ended up here somewhat by accident as we were just driving through on our way to a camping trip on Vancouver Island.

we love it here. I can't imagine ever going back to the South. I don't miss the weather there at all. I love the mild, consistent easiness of it. we don't have AC but put fans in every room to move the air, and got a portable AC unit and it's totally fine on the weeks it's actually warm. At first I thought people were a little nuts freaking out over 85 degrees. I grew up about 30 min from Savannah, GA with no AC. but I'll admit, my house turns into a greenhouse when it's warm here. I found it would be much cooler outside until I put up the fans.
we were specifically looking for a city that was progressive and had a solid arts and music scene. We're both creative fields - while it's not NYC, really only NYC is and there's a solid amount of jobs here. the arts are a much more dominant part of the culture. So many people I've met do something outside of work. SO has had a much easier time finding people to jam with. Charlotte was like a desert in that regard. The fact that I painted was kind of taken as "cute"
the live music scene is much better. Any time I wanted to see a band play before I was committing to a 3-4 hour drive each way. No one ever came through there. Since we moved I'll admit a bunch of those same bands are skipping the NW entirely and going through Charlotte. But I can't complain. We can still find a couple of shows a month to go see, which is crazy to me.

people carry on about the govt and taxes. in comparison to politics in the 5 Boroughs, or the good-ol-boy rhetoric that dominates the South, I've been a little bewildered by how relatively calm and reasonable things are here. NC is a mess these days. SC is famous for its politicians and the crap they pull. so I'll admit my frame of reference is a bit skewed. I know things are not all sunshine and roses. My property tax rate here in Issaquah, with awesome schools and services, is lower than what I pay on a piece of land only in Beaufort County, SC. that's on a dirt road, no sewer/water/town services, and horrible schools. they've raised my bill 7 times over the past 9 years. again, the frame of reference.

there's much to be said for how gorgeous the landscape is here. Seattle in the summer is like nothing I've seen anywhere. I still can't believe we can live on a couple acres on a mountain, can't see our neighbors, and get to a major city in 20 minutes. It continues to amaze me
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Old 07-20-2013, 04:03 PM
 
1,108 posts, read 2,285,448 times
Reputation: 694
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBVirtuoso View Post
I've hinted at this already, but I want to make it clear that there are plenty of things I don't like about Seattle. The city is small, and kind of just lacks stuff. If you're into a diverse and quirky restaurant scene, for instance, you won't find it here. The public transit is mediocre, and it's not really convenient to live without a car unless you live in a couple of select neighborhoods. The hills, while beautiful, also make for some extremely challenging transportation no matter which mode of travel you choose. But despite these (relatively minor) grievances, I think I'll grow to love Seattle. The fundamentals are all there, so now it's up to me to make my experience here a good one.

I'm curious why you call out Seattle as not having a diverse, quirky restaurant scene. It doesn't match the top 5 cities you mention, but is still quite good in that department. There is great Thai, Vietnamese, Ethiopian and plenty of other ethnic cuisine, and lots of hole in the walls that serve it.

Have you spent much time in South Seattle? Beacon Hill, Columbia City, White Center, sections of SODO, and several parts of the Rainier Valley and the Central District have a ton of funky, unique eateries and the quality of the food is high. The ID and Little Saigon to some extent, as well.

Seattle is also currently having a surge in restaurants that serve creative, locally-sourced, New-American style food. Places like The Blind Pig, Sitka and Spruce, Walrus and Carpenter. It's getting a lot of national press for it, as well.

Look at this national Eater poll of industry experts on the best current dining cities, a full 25% choose Seattle: Food Writers and Experts on the Best and Most Overrated Dining Cities of 2012 - Year In Eater 2012 - Eater National

Some quotes:

"Seattle is really a force to be reckoned with these days. The meals that I ate at Sitka and Spruce and The Walrus and the Carpenter, in particular, were remarkable for the quality of the cooking but also for how much it felt like you couldn't be eating those meals anywhere else."

"I had nothing but incredible food and wonderful experiences in Seattle, which I was not expecting. Loved the feel of Canlis...There's a weird positive energy surrounding that food scene.

Also, Bourdain seems pretty impressed as well: Seattle Episode: The Layover With Anthony Bourdain: Travel Channel

The Pike Place Market also offers a pretty awesome and wide-ranging selection of culinary treats.

Don't get me wrong, I'll take the food scene in SF or NYC over Seattle any day, but Seattle's is quite good too for a metro its size, and is more 'diverse and funky' than you give it credit for.
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Old 07-20-2013, 10:04 PM
 
83 posts, read 231,745 times
Reputation: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalex View Post
. We set out to find someplace we actually wanted to live instead of happening to end up there
Could you juxtapose life in the South vs. Seattle? I'd love to read what you have to say. It's like an epic story.

*Really curious*
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Old 07-20-2013, 10:27 PM
 
7,934 posts, read 8,587,137 times
Reputation: 5889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayela View Post
Yes and no. I'd say there are usually ~10 days or so where I swear I'm going to go buy one this year. Eh... then things cool off and I forget it til next year. Yes, those days are uncomfortable, but part of me kind of likes being a little overwarm because 1. I know it won't last, and 2. it feels like summer and makes me go lay by the pool with my neighbors, go for a walk to get an ice cream cone in the evening, and just generally get out of the house and be part of the summer activity in my neighborhood (none of whom have AC either). When I have AC, I tend to stay inside, and then I don't feel like we had summer. While I don't generally prefer heat and sunshine, even I have to admit that a little summer is a nice break.
That's fine, except when you're trying to sleep at night and it's stifling inside.
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Old 07-20-2013, 11:03 PM
 
644 posts, read 1,187,407 times
Reputation: 532
Quote:
Originally Posted by orzo View Post
I'm curious why you call out Seattle as not having a diverse, quirky restaurant scene. It doesn't match the top 5 cities you mention, but is still quite good in that department. There is great Thai, Vietnamese, Ethiopian and plenty of other ethnic cuisine, and lots of hole in the walls that serve it.

Have you spent much time in South Seattle? Beacon Hill, Columbia City, White Center, sections of SODO, and several parts of the Rainier Valley and the Central District have a ton of funky, unique eateries and the quality of the food is high. The ID and Little Saigon to some extent, as well.
I haven't spent any time in South Seattle yet, and I really need to. Hole in the wall restaurants are my favorite, and I'm usually willing to trek long distances to go find them.

I wouldn't say that Seattle's restaurant scene is poor, and I do agree that it's pretty good for a city of Seattle's size. I guess my main gripe is that I feel like the restaurants are a downgrade from Chicago, and it will take me a bit of time to get over that. Just give me a bit of time before I become obsessed with pho.
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Old 07-22-2013, 02:23 AM
 
101 posts, read 201,620 times
Reputation: 71
the people who love seattle, are generally people who love skiing and snowboarding.
they dont mind the winter months like the rest of the city
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Old 03-08-2024, 12:20 AM
 
3 posts, read 625 times
Reputation: 30
Wink Mix of Nostalgia and Appreciation

I REALLY love Seattle. I grew up here. My grandma worked in the Starbucks Corporate HQ building in SODO back when it was the Sears Catalogue Distribution Center. My grandpa worked as a car salesman on Lake City Way. I rode the Bubblevator at the Seattle Center House, watched every episode of Almost Live, ate at The Dog House, saw the Kingdome get blown to smithereens, was a senior in high school when Nirvana and grunge broke, geeked out on Hate comics, put flowers on Bruce Lee's grave, grieved Kurt's death, and witnessed the rise of the Dot.Com industry/Amazon. The city, my city, was a place of pure joy. The purest. As a young cartoonist, I joined the Cartoonist's Northwest Association and met some amazing folks like Gary Larson (The Far Side), Brian Basset and Chuck Jones.

Then I moved away. First to Portland, then to SLC, UT. I found Portland a little too Type B, a little far left, and a little too rainy. For me, SLC was a nightmare. Hot, dusty, conservative, stiff, humorless and isolated. Yuck. I was derailed and pulled away from Seattle for about 20 years, and while I was gone, Seattle was in. It was growing like gangbusters. It weathered the 2008 housing crisis. Small corporations became mega corporations. Housing got really, REALLY expensive. Nearly all my family and most of my friends moved away. Most of the places I loved went out of business, and the buildings were replaced by new, plasticy skyscrapers. It fell victim to the opioid epidemic. It's nigh-unrecognizable. So different than the city of my childhood.

That all said, I still love it, and I'm so happy to be back. Seattle has an energy about it that I've never found replicated in any other city. It's a kind of unique, clever, geek confidence that feeds experimentation, innovation and success. This little city has left an outsized footprint on the entire globe, from tech to art/music to retail to aeronautics. I live off that energy, and I thrive on it. I love the city's past (and my part in it), and I love where the city is going.

On a more practical note, I love the high literacy rate. I love that Seattleites consume movies, plays, music and comics to such a large degree. I love the fancy, and I love the down-to-Earth (Dicks Drive-In, Beth's Cafe, the Doughnut stand at Pike Place or Seattle Dogs at the Center). I love the hills, trees, water, parks, trails and the general walkability. I love the rain, and the heavenly spring/summer days. The squirrels, the crows, pigeons, seagulls and hummingbirds are wonderful. I love taking ferries across the Sound. I love the Cascades and the Olympics. The International District is great. south Seattle is great. Alki Beach is amazing. And Capitol Hill is my home... a great little. city inside a city. I'm just scratching the surface. It's a whole lot of awesomeness and some great people to share it with.

It's nice to be back.
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Old 03-08-2024, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Seattle
8,169 posts, read 8,289,381 times
Reputation: 5986
Quote:
Originally Posted by SViola View Post
I REALLY love Seattle. I grew up here. My grandma worked in the Starbucks Corporate HQ building in SODO back when it was the Sears Catalogue Distribution Center. My grandpa worked as a car salesman on Lake City Way. I rode the Bubblevator at the Seattle Center House, watched every episode of Almost Live, ate at The Dog House, saw the Kingdome get blown to smithereens, was a senior in high school when Nirvana and grunge broke, geeked out on Hate comics, put flowers on Bruce Lee's grave, grieved Kurt's death, and witnessed the rise of the Dot.Com industry/Amazon. The city, my city, was a place of pure joy. The purest. As a young cartoonist, I joined the Cartoonist's Northwest Association and met some amazing folks like Gary Larson (The Far Side), Brian Basset and Chuck Jones.

Then I moved away. First to Portland, then to SLC, UT. I found Portland a little too Type B, a little far left, and a little too rainy. For me, SLC was a nightmare. Hot, dusty, conservative, stiff, humorless and isolated. Yuck. I was derailed and pulled away from Seattle for about 20 years, and while I was gone, Seattle was in. It was growing like gangbusters. It weathered the 2008 housing crisis. Small corporations became mega corporations. Housing got really, REALLY expensive. Nearly all my family and most of my friends moved away. Most of the places I loved went out of business, and the buildings were replaced by new, plasticy skyscrapers. It fell victim to the opioid epidemic. It's nigh-unrecognizable. So different than the city of my childhood.

That all said, I still love it, and I'm so happy to be back. Seattle has an energy about it that I've never found replicated in any other city. It's a kind of unique, clever, geek confidence that feeds experimentation, innovation and success. This little city has left an outsized footprint on the entire globe, from tech to art/music to retail to aeronautics. I live off that energy, and I thrive on it. I love the city's past (and my part in it), and I love where the city is going.

On a more practical note, I love the high literacy rate. I love that Seattleites consume movies, plays, music and comics to such a large degree. I love the fancy, and I love the down-to-Earth (Dicks Drive-In, Beth's Cafe, the Doughnut stand at Pike Place or Seattle Dogs at the Center). I love the hills, trees, water, parks, trails and the general walkability. I love the rain, and the heavenly spring/summer days. The squirrels, the crows, pigeons, seagulls and hummingbirds are wonderful. I love taking ferries across the Sound. I love the Cascades and the Olympics. The International District is great. south Seattle is great. Alki Beach is amazing. And Capitol Hill is my home... a great little. city inside a city. I'm just scratching the surface. It's a whole lot of awesomeness and some great people to share it with.

It's nice to be back.
Wow Viola, welcome home!
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Old 03-09-2024, 03:41 AM
 
7,108 posts, read 8,960,867 times
Reputation: 6415
Quote:
Originally Posted by SViola View Post
I REALLY love Seattle. I grew up here. My grandma worked in the Starbucks Corporate HQ building in SODO back when it was the Sears Catalogue Distribution Center. My grandpa worked as a car salesman on Lake City Way. I rode the Bubblevator at the Seattle Center House, watched every episode of Almost Live, ate at The Dog House, saw the Kingdome get blown to smithereens, was a senior in high school when Nirvana and grunge broke, geeked out on Hate comics, put flowers on Bruce Lee's grave, grieved Kurt's death, and witnessed the rise of the Dot.Com industry/Amazon. The city, my city, was a place of pure joy. The purest. As a young cartoonist, I joined the Cartoonist's Northwest Association and met some amazing folks like Gary Larson (The Far Side), Brian Basset and Chuck Jones.

Then I moved away. First to Portland, then to SLC, UT. I found Portland a little too Type B, a little far left, and a little too rainy. For me, SLC was a nightmare. Hot, dusty, conservative, stiff, humorless and isolated. Yuck. I was derailed and pulled away from Seattle for about 20 years, and while I was gone, Seattle was in. It was growing like gangbusters. It weathered the 2008 housing crisis. Small corporations became mega corporations. Housing got really, REALLY expensive. Nearly all my family and most of my friends moved away. Most of the places I loved went out of business, and the buildings were replaced by new, plasticy skyscrapers. It fell victim to the opioid epidemic. It's nigh-unrecognizable. So different than the city of my childhood.

That all said, I still love it, and I'm so happy to be back. Seattle has an energy about it that I've never found replicated in any other city. It's a kind of unique, clever, geek confidence that feeds experimentation, innovation and success. This little city has left an outsized footprint on the entire globe, from tech to art/music to retail to aeronautics. I live off that energy, and I thrive on it. I love the city's past (and my part in it), and I love where the city is going.

On a more practical note, I love the high literacy rate. I love that Seattleites consume movies, plays, music and comics to such a large degree. I love the fancy, and I love the down-to-Earth (Dicks Drive-In, Beth's Cafe, the Doughnut stand at Pike Place or Seattle Dogs at the Center). I love the hills, trees, water, parks, trails and the general walkability. I love the rain, and the heavenly spring/summer days. The squirrels, the crows, pigeons, seagulls and hummingbirds are wonderful. I love taking ferries across the Sound. I love the Cascades and the Olympics. The International District is great. south Seattle is great. Alki Beach is amazing. And Capitol Hill is my home... a great little. city inside a city. I'm just scratching the surface. It's a whole lot of awesomeness and some great people to share it with.

It's nice to be back.
I love this.
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