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Old 02-04-2014, 02:34 AM
 
63 posts, read 161,946 times
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Is one of the 3 superior than the other?
What is the ranking in terms of value, real estate value.
Can someone tell me the difference in neighbourhood.


Also which one is more suitable for single female age early 30s
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Old 02-04-2014, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Seattle
458 posts, read 837,230 times
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Queen Anne feels in many ways more urban. Certainly you can walk to many many things...grocery stores, yoga studios, coffee shops, boutiques, restaurants etc! Queen Anne would feel most similar to Kits.

Magnolia is quieter, less expensive and feels in many ways like the least urban neighborhood in Seattle. It feels more removed while Queen Anne feels like it is right in the middle of everything. Lower Queen Anne would be closer to downtown, SLU (Where Amazon is), and potentially could have views of the beautiful skyline and Elliott Bay. Upper Queen Anne is where the concentration of the shopping is..along Queen Anne Avenue. Though there is a lot on lower Queen Anne too.

Magnolia is where Discovery Park is which is one of the great gems of the city with spectacular views facing The Olympics, wide open fields and miles and miles of trails. There is a central area of Magnolia where you will find shopping, coffee shops, restaurants etc..and depending on where you are in Magnolia, you could possibly walk to it. Most of Magnolia is not walking distance to that area though.

People in Seattle tend to feel very passionate about their neighborhoods and I have friends and clients who live in both and wouldn't live in any other part of the city. I think it really depends on what you are looking for.
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Old 02-04-2014, 02:33 PM
 
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Lower Queen Anne is the most urban of the three. There are less single family homes, and more apartments and condos. Because of how near it is to downtown, I think that protects it some from price declines.

Upper Queen is a fun neighborhood. It has a lot of cool older houses, and the neighborhood is expensive and highly sought after. It is less urban than Lower Queen Anne.

Magnolia feels more like a suburb even though it's within the city. Magnolia has some awesome views, and is more 1960's and newer buildings than Queen Anne, which has a lot of older buildings. But Magnolia still has retail and restaurants.

For things to do and proximity of things to do, Lower Queen Anne is the best of the three. But Upper Queen Anne has plenty of places to shop and eat. And Magnolia might be the prettiest, it's not like there's absolutely nothing to do there.
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Old 02-04-2014, 02:54 PM
 
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Can you compare the public schools (middle and high) in those 3 neighborhoods, Ira500 and beautifulseattlehomes? Does poor school quality essentially rule out any, all, or none of those areas?
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Old 02-04-2014, 03:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bloom View Post
Can you compare the public schools (middle and high) in those 3 neighborhoods, Ira500 and beautifulseattlehomes? Does poor school quality essentially rule out any, all, or none of those areas?
As far as I know, the assigned middle school for Upper QA, Lower QA, and Magnolia would be McClure Middle School, and the assigned HS for all would be Ballard. Ballard HS is well thought of, and McClure is supposed to be pretty good, but there's also Catherine Blaine K-8, which has a great reputation.
Seattle doesn't have universally poor school quality. It's more that there are plenty of schools within the Seattle district that are bad, and administratively and policy wise, they often are doing things with the seeming intent of alienating parents. At the same time, there are lots of good schools within the city, and there will continue to be. It's just that if you live on the eastside, you can just go about your business and correctly assume that the school district won't come up with some plan that's doomed to fail, or will make seemingly arbitrary changes to your kid's school. It requires more vigilant parents, and those schools which are good in Seattle and will continue to be also have a history of very active parents who have found it necessary to fight at times with the school district or Board of Education.
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Old 02-04-2014, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Seattle
458 posts, read 837,230 times
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School quality makes a big difference though as I have written before, many people in Seattle, 1 in 9 the last time I checked, send their children to private school so neighborhoods based on the local schools become somewhat less important. I think that in terms of resale value, the local schools do make a big difference.

The high school that Queen Anne and Magnolia feed into is Ballard HS which is in the Ballard neighborhood so not terribly close. Ballard HS is one of those schools that gets passionate viewpoints on both ends. Just today a friend and I were speaking of a young woman who we know who went to private through 8th grade and then went on to Ballard. It it a huge school so the transition was tough for her but she has found her footing to the point that she is thriving and doesn't want to switch even though she was accepted at two of the best privates high schools in the city. Ballard has, like many schools AP and also has specialized schools within the school which seems to make a big difference in terms of the education the kids are receiving. I can tell you that my babysitter goes there and I can't think of a more lovely, poised and hard working young woman. She is one impressive 16 year old and swims and does gymnastics on the school teams.

Then there is the Center School in Seattle Center which is an option high school based on geographic location. It is much smaller and some people love it. Others think it isn't structured enough therefore not providing real guidance for kids who really want to college track. It has gone through a lot of changes in leadership the last couple of years which some people rate positively.

McClure is the middle school on Queen Anne and I have not heard much about it. All the folks that I know who live on the hill send their children to private school in middle school so what that means for the quality of McClure I am not quite sure.

Middle School seems to be a time when parents really consider putting kids into private school because in my conversations, that is the time when a lot can be made or broken and for many grownups I know was a painful time in their own life so are wanting to mitigate some of that for their children.

My own opinion is that I don't find the public middle schools in Seattle very appealing...Hamilton Intl. School would be the exception but it is very large and that is tough for some kids.

I hope this helped...I think the best way to get a feel is to visit the schools during the school day and see how they feel to you and if you think they would be a good fit for your children.

Please feel free to PM me if you have any other questions. I know the Seattle school thing very well both for my family and through the eyes of my clients. I have visited many of them over the years public and private.
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Old 02-04-2014, 06:14 PM
 
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Thanks Ira and b-s-h, do either of you or any one else here can compare neighborhoods & schools in San Diego area versus Seattle area, so I can get some kind of reference? Maybe vs. Boston area too.
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Old 02-05-2014, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Seattle
458 posts, read 837,230 times
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I think, and mind you this is not coming from a dissertation level of knowledge on urban public school districts, you would find that in San Diego city they wouldn't be that great but if you lived in La Jolla they would be excellent. Boston would be a bit more similar to NYC public schools in terms of having some exceptional, best in the country, public high schools. Stuyvesant, Brooklyn Latin and Bronx Science are some of the best public high schools in the United States and Boston would have Boston Latin which many would say is comparative in excellence.

Sadly and surprisingly Seattle Public Schools does not have any thing of that same caliber. The International School in Bellevue is first class but I believe like the above mentioned schools, has lottery and test based admissions. So where you live, as long as you live in the district since it is lottery based, doesn't really matter just as long as it is part of that school district.

Seattle has choice/option schools and if one of the schools you are interested in is one of those than you are free to list it in your top three choices when enrolling. The geographic map boundaries are also quite large for example Ingraham HS which has the IB program has a large part of city that feeds into it.

I hope I haven't confused you more!
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Old 02-05-2014, 09:19 PM
 
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Thanks b-s-h. Do you or others have any knowledge of neighborhood comparisons between Seattle area and San Diego area? Or Boston area?
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Old 02-06-2014, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Seattle
458 posts, read 837,230 times
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This is a long answer and I hope it makes sense. In the city of Seattle there are stunning neighborhoods that don't necessarily feed into top rated schools. It's that pesky private school attendance thing again in which I am also including all the Catholic schools of which there are many.

Growing up back east and living in California for many years, this came as the biggest surprise to me. Great neighborhoods equated to great schools where I come from. Here not so much.

There are a few neighborhoods that I drive through in Seattle where I feel like I could be in any wonderful neighborhood in the NE. Blue Ridge comes to mind (feeds into Ballard HS). But in general Seattle is a very different city from those places and there is a lot of mix in many neighborhoods.

They really don't feel similar to any place I have been before. People say West Seattle feels very Californiaesque but that is subjective. Madison Park feels like some of the old established Boston neighborhoods with many older, large stately homes (feeds into Garfield HS). North Capitol Hill is a beautiful neighborhood filled with stunning large arts and crafts era homes. Madrona is full of these types of homes too, some with gorgeous lake views. Mt Baker is lovely and full of many larger, traditional style homes and is SE of downtown. Most everyone I know who lives in these neighborhoods sends their children to private school.

My friend is the CFO of a very large world renowned Seattle based company and lives on a block of mostly modest homes in the largest house on the block in a north Seattle neighborhood. Truly next door to a 900 square foot cottage in so so shape. I always laugh a little because Seattle is so different from other cities in that way. The delineation is just not as clear cut the way it is in Boston or San Diego or most anywhere else I've been for that matter.

If I were moving to Seattle and private schools were out of the question, I would choose the schools I wanted my children to attend and work backwards from there. Roosevelt HS and Hamilton Intl. MS would be fed by a large part of the city that is filled with very nice neighborhoods...Green Lake, Wallingford, Phinney, Fremont.
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