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Old 10-02-2015, 08:14 PM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
9,398 posts, read 8,880,044 times
Reputation: 8812

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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
You're not surfing in either city.

Denver doesn't have green views when you drive. Chances are, you're not seeing out of the freeway, and/or are only seeing residential/commercial/industrial areas. Denver freeways' "nature" consists of flat land with dried out weeds, and maybe a distant view of dusty hills, or the local gray/brown (depends on season).

Denver is close to Colorado Springs and Cheyenne. Not exactly Portland and Vancouver...

If you don't mind the rain, and not much snow, then why in the heck are you even considering Denver? (you basically describe Seattle here). In Denver, it rains only during summer, and only for 20-30 minutes at a time, and it snows all the freaking time. We WILL have snow before this month ends, and we can easily have 50 degree swings in the matter of a day (high of 57, low of 3, not unheard of). We get upper 90's and -10's every year (if that's not the definition of too hot and too cold, I don't know what is).

Don't get me wrong, Denver has its merits, but for the MILLIONTH time, they are nothing alike.

Edit: They both have legal weed. It mostly ends there.
Yes, they are nothing alike, except that the metros are similar in population, though Seattle's MSA and CSA are bigger. But size isn't always the best measure.

Seattle is developing its downtown and nearby areas much quicker than Denver. This is going to make Seattle more dense than ever, and will eclipse Denver even with new projects.

Seattle is dreary not 9 months of the year, but perhaps 6. But this myth is corrected by the fact that the winter gloom lasts usually during November through February, with more sunny to partly cloudy days in the Spring. The Seattle metro rarely goes below freezing, and when it does, it is during clear weather. Snowfall can indeed bear down on both metros, but in Seattle it is a rare event, in Denver, it is common. The wild swings in temps are more valid in Denver, as Seattle tends to moderate to the Ocean/Sound temps.

I would recommend Seattle over Denver compared to Michigan. I think the climate will suit you fine.
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Old 10-04-2015, 12:24 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale az
850 posts, read 796,545 times
Reputation: 773
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Yes, they are nothing alike, except that the metros are similar in population, though Seattle's MSA and CSA are bigger. But size isn't always the best measure.

Seattle is developing its downtown and nearby areas much quicker than Denver. This is going to make Seattle more dense than ever, and will eclipse Denver even with new projects.

Seattle is dreary not 9 months of the year, but perhaps 6. But this myth is corrected by the fact that the winter gloom lasts usually during November through February, with more sunny to partly cloudy days in the Spring. The Seattle metro rarely goes below freezing, and when it does, it is during clear weather. Snowfall can indeed bear down on both metros, but in Seattle it is a rare event, in Denver, it is common. The wild swings in temps are more valid in Denver, as Seattle tends to moderate to the Ocean/Sound temps.

I would recommend Seattle over Denver compared to Michigan. I think the climate will suit you fine.
What is the temperature like from march to June? is it also mostly gloomy?
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Old 10-04-2015, 05:07 PM
 
731 posts, read 935,847 times
Reputation: 1128
Temps would range from 45-68 during those months and, yes, mostly gloomy. The gloom depends on the year, though. We're experiencing an El Nino weather pattern right now and the weather is just fantastic. Before that, however, we had three years of cool gloomy weather, even into the summer. One summer we didn't even get into the 70's until around mid-July.

While the El Nino can make us seem like we have near perfect weather, it's important to point out that it just won't last (unfortunately) and then you'll have to deal with the gloomy weather much longer.
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Old 10-04-2015, 05:57 PM
 
7,743 posts, read 15,871,819 times
Reputation: 10457
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
You can't surf in Portland either, sorry.

Anyhow, Denver is a landlord's market right now. There simply aren't very many vacancies right now, which is driving rental prices up. Only marginally cheaper than Seattle tbh.
The only surfing in Portland is going to be windsurfing, that's definitely a big deal there.



A friend of mine was saying that Vancouver (WA), Portland and Seattle were in the top 5 in the nation for sharp increases in rent. At this point, the OP also needs to factor the job issue.
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Old 10-04-2015, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale az
850 posts, read 796,545 times
Reputation: 773
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkpoe View Post
The only surfing in Portland is going to be windsurfing, that's definitely a big deal there.



A friend of mine was saying that Vancouver (WA), Portland and Seattle were in the top 5 in the nation for sharp increases in rent. At this point, the OP also needs to factor the job issue.
Rents through out the whole country have gone up, I lived in Atlanta and Chicago before and now 1 bedrooms are much higher than years before. The only place that rents haven't gone up is probably the parking lot.
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Old 10-04-2015, 06:44 PM
 
7,743 posts, read 15,871,819 times
Reputation: 10457
Quote:
Originally Posted by oping00 View Post
Rents through out the whole country have gone up, I lived in Atlanta and Chicago before and now 1 bedrooms are much higher than years before. The only place that rents haven't gone up is probably the parking lot.
Oh, parking is definitely expensive as well.


The reference to my friend's statement: Vancouver had nation's fastest-rising rents, website finds; Portland in 3rd | OregonLive.com
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Old 10-04-2015, 10:38 PM
 
371 posts, read 362,570 times
Reputation: 899
As a 37-year resident of Denver, I have a little to add. As it happens, I'm considering relocation to Seattle, during the years my only child is in Tacoma at the University of Puget Sound. So I'm studying up on the area, which has always drawn me

Here's the pluses I see of each:

Some great things about Denver:
- Transportation: We're finishing up our sixth & seventh long light rail line from downtown to the suburbs. They offer an escape from the horrible freeway traffic across our metro, which is now about 600 square miles. Grid pattern streets provide alternate driving routes. And we have over 100 miles of separated bike trails, so overall, it's easy to get around, And no water in the way.
- Sunshine, if you like that sort of thing. Even on overcast days, I wear sunglasses for the brightness. There's a downside to the high, dry climate though; tough on your skin, sinuses and eyes.
- Powder snow. That's a big deal, if you ski, or have to shovel it.
- The People: generally courteous and friendly. We're mostly Midwesterners, striking a good middle ground between East Coast aggressiveness and reserve. There's no talk here of a "Denver Freeze," is there?

Some not-so-great things about Denver (vs. Seattle)
- Growth and congestion: with natural boundaries only on the west, Front Range cities are growing together into a solid urban/suburban corridor. Air quality is dropping again, with so many vehicles and all the new oil and gas wells near the city. Colorado's population has doubled since I came, but very few new campsites and parks have been added. All the best recreation areas are in one direction from Denver, with two highways, so recreational rush hours are severe on weekends and holidays.
- the semi-arid climate: For eight months of the year, dust is more frequent than rain. A prominent suburban peak called Green Mountain was green for four months that year, but it's usually only two. Brown and blue should be our state colors.
- the local culture: I've seen Denver score No. 5 on a list of the Most Macho Cities. That's true, if not an understatement. They may have been considering our five major-league sports teams and our beer-brewing prowess, but I also see too many examples of the "Texas, 'Murica", rolling coal, gun-totin' mentality. There are many angry people here, drawn to extremes. Harleys are huge here, with five or so dealerships. We let them rode bareheaded, so the state is a draw. There are so many folks presenting a fearsome image, though most will smile if you approach them the right way. I would expect less of that in Seattle, and I wouldn't miss it.
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Old 10-05-2015, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,827 posts, read 29,939,634 times
Reputation: 14429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheatridger View Post
As a 37-year resident of Denver, I have a little to add. As it happens, I'm considering relocation to Seattle, during the years my only child is in Tacoma at the University of Puget Sound. So I'm studying up on the area, which has always drawn me

Here's the pluses I see of each:

Some great things about Denver:
- Transportation: We're finishing up our sixth & seventh long light rail line from downtown to the suburbs. They offer an escape from the horrible freeway traffic across our metro, which is now about 600 square miles. Grid pattern streets provide alternate driving routes. And we have over 100 miles of separated bike trails, so overall, it's easy to get around, And no water in the way.
- Sunshine, if you like that sort of thing. Even on overcast days, I wear sunglasses for the brightness. There's a downside to the high, dry climate though; tough on your skin, sinuses and eyes.
- Powder snow. That's a big deal, if you ski, or have to shovel it.
- The People: generally courteous and friendly. We're mostly Midwesterners, striking a good middle ground between East Coast aggressiveness and reserve. There's no talk here of a "Denver Freeze," is there?

Some not-so-great things about Denver (vs. Seattle)
- Growth and congestion: with natural boundaries only on the west, Front Range cities are growing together into a solid urban/suburban corridor. Air quality is dropping again, with so many vehicles and all the new oil and gas wells near the city. Colorado's population has doubled since I came, but very few new campsites and parks have been added. All the best recreation areas are in one direction from Denver, with two highways, so recreational rush hours are severe on weekends and holidays.
- the semi-arid climate: For eight months of the year, dust is more frequent than rain. A prominent suburban peak called Green Mountain was green for four months that year, but it's usually only two. Brown and blue should be our state colors.
- the local culture: I've seen Denver score No. 5 on a list of the Most Macho Cities. That's true, if not an understatement. They may have been considering our five major-league sports teams and our beer-brewing prowess, but I also see too many examples of the "Texas, 'Murica", rolling coal, gun-totin' mentality. There are many angry people here, drawn to extremes. Harleys are huge here, with five or so dealerships. We let them rode bareheaded, so the state is a draw. There are so many folks presenting a fearsome image, though most will smile if you approach them the right way. I would expect less of that in Seattle, and I wouldn't miss it.
I always wondered why they called it "Green Mountain", because I've only ever seen it brown (or white).

I've mostly had trouble with the people here, but never have in Seattle/etc. Good luck to you in your prospective move.
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Old 10-05-2015, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
8,071 posts, read 8,367,466 times
Reputation: 6233
Far be it for me to discourage you from moving somewhere else. Not everyone can take Seattle's November through March short gray/dark days. And the skiing is much better in Colorado.
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:08 PM
 
371 posts, read 362,570 times
Reputation: 899
Yes, it is. But the lift tix are a lot more reasonable out there. I let skiing rule my place choice for three decades. Passing 60, I'm beginning to favor other criteria. Or maybe I'm just hankering for a change?

Denver, Seattle: these are first-world choices, and prime ones at that.

One day near Seattle stands out. The kid and I visited Mt. Rainier on Easter Sunday. The mountain was truly amazing, even after all the mountains I've seen in the Rockies. But I expected that. What amazed me was that on an Easter Sunday afternoon, we were almost alone there. I'd drive for minutes without meeting another car. Colorado's Rocky Mountain National Park never looks like that on any weekend or holiday, outside the dead of winter when only a few spots there are open.

If you love outdoor recreation and cultural exploration, Seattle has Denver beat, IMHO. You can easily visit three big national parks, in three compass directions, to spread the traffic. Or the coastline, and Portland and Vancouver are also within an easy drive. Compare that to Denver, with mountains to the west, endless suburbs to the north and south, and flat, grassy deserts to the east. Oh, we have Colorado Springs and Cheyenne, if you want to see another city. Denver often seems as isolated as a Pacific Island, while Seattle seems linked to the world.
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