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Old 01-02-2020, 03:34 PM
 
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I just drove by that Barnes and Noble a few days ago- I was surprised it was still there. I used to see it all the time when I took the 271 into downtown Bellevue, but the one in Crossroads closed a few years ago and I assumed the downtown one was already gone as well.

Brick and Mortar Books in Redmond Town Center seems to be going strong. They have frequent events and they have been super busy this holiday season.
https://www.brickandmortarbooks.com

I have to admit that I rarely buy books, although I am an avid reader (I just started and finished a large novel today, as a matter of fact-- and that's the 3rd time I've done that in the past week or so). I love bookstores, though.

I am a huge library supporter, and will read physical and ebooks. LOVE books, no matter what kind! I was a relatively early adopter of ebooks, with my old school Sony E-reader back way before Kindle was something people had heard of. But I have always read physical copies as well.
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Old 04-08-2020, 02:47 AM
 
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Big plaza corporate services do not need book stores . They need more apartments that can attract huge profits.
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Old 04-08-2020, 09:24 AM
 
1,674 posts, read 1,355,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkotronics View Post
The one thing I liked about Barnes & Noble, is that they had a coffee bar area built into the store. Great idea, for meeting people at the bookstore and having fun browsing together.


Right on, Ruth4Truth. I like that about Barnes & Noble, too. You can grab a magazine or a book and have a seat and read till your hearts content.

This is why Borders closed, and B&N is closing. Too many people browsing and reading. Not enough people buying.

Too many people use bookstores as a free hangout spot. But bookstores must pay rent or property taxes, utilities, insurance, employee salaries. They can't afford the upkeep if people are just coming in to hang out, then leave.
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Old 04-08-2020, 09:34 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
88,518 posts, read 82,591,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinema Cat View Post
This is why Borders closed, and B&N is closing. Too many people browsing and reading. Not enough people buying.

Too many people use bookstores as a free hangout spot. But bookstores must pay rent or property taxes, utilities, insurance, employee salaries. They can't afford the upkeep if people are just coming in to hang out, then leave.
Well, that's true of a number of retail niches; art galleries, for one thing. Antique stores. How many people attend art gallery events for the fun opening night of the month's featured artists, but never buy? The monthly art-walk evenings in any given city have become a form of free entertainment for some people. Great date-night activity, costing nothing.

I was never a fan of the corporate chain bookstores, anyway. OK, B & N in my town gained a following, because they had a coffee shop corner, and also a good music section. They did pretty well in sales, but they occupied such a huge, barn-like space, that I think in the end, the rising rents did them in. (Along with whatever was going on, on the national corporate level.) They could have been more compact, like the indie bookstores that are still going strong.
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Old 04-08-2020, 10:10 AM
 
1,674 posts, read 1,355,548 times
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
They could have been more compact, like the indie bookstores that are still going strong.
Throughout the 2000s, indie bookstores were closing, due to pressure from Borders and B&N. Then when Borders folded, and B&N closed many stores, a vacuum was created, so that some new indie bookstores opened. But the total number of bookstore shelf space never recovered. Much less brick & mortar retail space for books now than 20 years ago. Amazon is the big winner.

One big problem for retailers is that many customers will browse for books, computers, whatever, in stores. Then when they find what they like, they go online for the cheapest prices.
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Old 04-08-2020, 10:17 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
88,518 posts, read 82,591,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinema Cat View Post
Throughout the 2000s, indie bookstores were closing, due to pressure from Borders and B&N. Then when Borders folded, and B&N closed many stores, a vacuum was created, so that some new indie bookstores opened. But the total number of bookstore shelf space never recovered. Much less brick & mortar retail space for books now than 20 years ago. Amazon is the big winner.

One big problem for retailers is that many customers will browse for books, computers, whatever, in stores. Then when they find what they like, they go online for the cheapest prices.
I was talking about indie bookstores that go back generations, and adapted to the pressures from corporate chains, and later--Amazon, by hosting events, and becoming "happening" places. A few even opened used-book side businesses, and started selling on Amazon, as one survival tactic.

The key is adaptability. Corporate chain retailers aren't very adaptable. It's one reason why central planning in the Soviet bloc didn't work, and ultimately crashed.

But yes, IMO, the threat Amazon presents to small retailers is a shame. Still, some of them manage to hang on, for which I'm grateful. I also question how much cheaper it is to buy something on Amazon vs. at your local book or hardware store, or whatever, after you pay for shipping. Their shipping rates went up a couple of years ago, too. I guess it keeps the USPS in business, though...
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Old 04-08-2020, 12:40 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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I don't see Amazon being a big threat to bookstores, it's the availability of digital books. My wife has been a big reader all of her life, and now all of her reading is digital on the Kindle or her iPad, and that's still 1-2 hours a day. Many of them are coming from the King County Library eBooks. The last time we went into as bookstore was the one at Crossroads (now gone) and that was to buy a calendar.
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Old 04-08-2020, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
7,640 posts, read 7,271,126 times
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This is why Borders closed, and B&N is closing. Too many people browsing and reading. Not enough people buying.

Too many people use bookstores as a free hangout spot. But bookstores must pay rent or property taxes, utilities, insurance, employee salaries. They can't afford the upkeep if people are just coming in to hang out, then leave.


Ahh, you didn't get the rest of the story. Mrs. elkotronics would often buy books she was interested in from Barnes & Nobles while I read car magazines. And as of right now, Barnes & Noble is still alive at the Mesilla Valley Mall in Las Cruces.

The one I really, really hated ta see go out of business was Hasting's Books/CD's/DVD's. Absolutely the coolest store on the planet and my favorite retail store of all time. I was literally in playland each and every time I went in there. I would buy new Seahawk's coffee mugs, DVD's, CD's and books pert-near every time I went in to the store. Plus, they rented out DVD's as well. We used the Hasting's Store in Dodge City, KS, to the absolute full. And the checkout lines were rocking I'd say every 1 out of 2 times we went in there. I was really upset ta see Hasting's go out of business. They were smaller than Barnes & Noble but sold similar items. Where they had Barnes & Noble beat was in the coffee mugs, posters, toys and cut-rate CD and DVD sales. Absolute shame ta see Hasting's go out of business and it shocked me ta see it happen.

Like I say, I think Barnes & Noble is still open for business in Las Cruces, not now because of COVID-19, but AFAIK they're gonna be still open for business when the lockdown is lifted by Trump and Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham in New Mexico. I don't really dig buying books, CD's or DVD's online, anywhere. Of those 3 items I will buy occasional CD's online that I burn to my USB stick to play in my car. But buying clothes online? What? No way, Jay.

Last edited by elkotronics; 04-08-2020 at 02:29 PM..
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Old 04-09-2020, 05:48 PM
 
Location: NW Seattle
3,429 posts, read 1,757,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Bellevue still has a Barnes & Noble? I thought B & N folded years ago. Quite a few of their stores nationwide closed, so I thought the company had folded, due to competition from Amazon.

Does anywhere on the East side have an independent bookstore? Seattle's Elliott Bay Bookstore is still going strong, as is the UW Bookstore in the U District. Of course the latter is sustained by its textbook department, but that's only a small fraction of its inventory.
There's still a Barnes & Noble in Tukwila.
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Old 04-11-2020, 03:37 PM
 
459 posts, read 385,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Barnes & Noble isn't what I would call "old school", being a nationwide chain. IDK about you, but I found that their selection in any given department wasn't very in-depth. Certainly not when you compare it to the UW Bookstore, which always seemed to have a better selection on their main floor than any chain bookstore, even though B & N (etc.) was a much larger store. It's pretty much the same with the big indie bookstores in Berkeley, and also Powell's in Portland. Any chain bookstore can't compare with them for quality of the selection. I consider the chain bookstore concept to be "new school".

I agree, too, about the advantage of being able to page through a book before purchasing. While Amazon has curtailed that feature on their site (you used to be able to do that; I was even able to use Amazon for research purposes, without buying the books!), you can still look at the Table of Contents of most books, to see what the book offers and how it organizes its topic, and you can still do some spot-sampling, via their "surprise me" feature, that randomly selects a page or two (though that's not always helpful, if all you get is the bibliography pages or footnotes).
I don't know if you ever went to the UW Millcreek bookstore, but it was my go-to bookstore. I think it was just as good as the one on campus, well, next door to the UW campus anyway. The Mill Creek location closed a few months ago, and the building is still empty. They say the rent got too high. I feel bereft...Lynnwood's B & N just doesn't cut it.

However, Everett's Half Price Books continues to delight with books I'd never find in an ANY regular bookstore, so I count my blessings. If I leave the state, as it's looking like may happen soon, I will miss HPB enormously. I may just drive into Texas, where HPB was founded and thus has many locations, for a monthly bookstore escapade!
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