Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Self-Sufficiency and Preparedness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-02-2012, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
6,744 posts, read 8,506,827 times
Reputation: 14926

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
But in most of the US, plants (wild or not) do not grow during the winter. Nothing is in season during the winter other than perhaps some pine needle tea. Then what?

I've been studying wild edible plants for several years. But it ain't happenin' during the winter.
Right on point

In my neck of the woods we are expecting snow this week, and temperatures down to 20 F degrees.
(kinda rough on gardens).

Once the freeze sets in, there is very little plant material available for collection and consumption. Some berries will dry on the bush, like rosehips or thornapple, you can make spruce needle tea or pine needle tea, buds and bark from quaking aspen can be eaten, but mostly, if you don't have anything preserved, (or depend on shipments from more temperate areas), the only fresh fruit you will find will be trout through the ice or maybe a grouse or pheasant.

I am no dietician, but I do look at the way the Indians lived here, and they would have sometimes have rickets and scurvey by spring because of the lack of fruits/veg if they didn't have enough dried and stored.

Mountain Men and Pioneers ran into the same problem.

Methane is a natural byproduct of normal decomposition of organic material in an anaerobic environment,(no oxygen). That is how methane gas and natural gas are made.

In this case, it seems to me that either drying or pickling would be the top choices for storage as the drying exposes the fruit to air and doesn't limit the oxygen exposure, and the acids in vinagar while excellent anti-oxidents, will also limit the growth of bacteria as well, with canning running a strong 3rd.

There used to be apples that would store in a root cellar for the winter too and be edible. Not widely available today, but may be something to look at for those who's climate will support that kind of orchard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-02-2012, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,485 posts, read 10,431,469 times
Reputation: 21455
All of this stuff is just plain horseradish.

I've been eating canned fruits and juices for 65 years now (longer than most of you have been alive) and I dunno...maybe that's what makes me so ornery (?). My ancestors ate and drank canned as well, and lived to good old ages.

All right now, those of you who are scaredy-cats can go back to your conversation. I'll just mosey on down to the basement and maybe grab a can of apricots with the skin still on 'em. Sounds good right about now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2012, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
10,420 posts, read 14,519,210 times
Reputation: 22015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
All of this stuff is just plain horseradish.

I've been eating canned fruits and juices for 65 years now (longer than most of you have been alive) and I dunno...maybe that's what makes me so ornery (?). My ancestors ate and drank canned as well, and lived to good old ages.

All right now, those of you who are scaredy-cats can go back to your conversation. I'll just mosey on down to the basement and maybe grab a can of apricots with the skin still on 'em. Sounds good right about now.
I'm with you. I average a half gallon bottle of Campbell's Tomato Juice every day and keep at least two hundred bottles in the larder. When I have time I do squeeze a couple lemons and put the juice in a twenty ounce glass, then fill with tomato juice. I've never found any substitute for fresh lemons.

I've been drinking tomato juice for the best part of sixty-nine years and am apparently still alive.

With respect to tomato juice brands I generally enjoy Campbell's the most. I did prefer Glorietta but the new stuff isn't the same. Red Gold is unacceptable as is College Inn.

Cooked tomato is probably the best single food to eat.

My father always said that a couple of bottles of beer everday would let him live to be a hundred. I don't know if it was the beer but he made it to a hundred plus ten days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2012, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
36,970 posts, read 40,917,684 times
Reputation: 44897
Quote:
Originally Posted by emilybh View Post
I wasn't aware of this until just now. Those of you stocking up on canned fruits might want to slow down.

Did you know the longer they sit in cans the more methane they build up? Listen to this Dr Mercola explanation. I might stop buying all processed canned or bottled fruits and fruit juices now and dump out the ones in my fridge. I had no idea this was a potential problem until tonight.Begin listening around the 6 min mark.
Dr. Mercola on The Raw Life #337 - YouTube


What do you think?
Hogwash. Mercola is an idiot.

http://www.life123.com/health/first-...oisoning.shtml

"Methane gas is not long lasting and evaporates quite quickly. It is usually inhaled because any methane in food or water evaporates in a short period of time. The gas can't be transferred by touch."

By the time you are able to open the package and consume the product, the methane is gone.

Intestinal gas and bloating.

Methane can be a normal component of intestinal gas. It is a byproduct of food digestion and whether it is produced may depend on the particular individual's bowel flora.

Unless the product has actually spoiled, the presence of methane is irrelevant, and if it has spoiled, there should be other evidence of it. There is no reason to avoid bottled or canned foods due to concerns about being poisoned by methane.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2012, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,485 posts, read 10,431,469 times
Reputation: 21455
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Methane can be a normal component of intestinal gas. It is a byproduct of food digestion and whether it is produced may depend on the particular individual's bowel flora.
Flatulent Cows

For maximum enjoyment, scroll all the way down the page!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2012, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
36,970 posts, read 40,917,684 times
Reputation: 44897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
Flatulent Cows

For maximum enjoyment, scroll all the way down the page!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2012, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,731 posts, read 9,905,126 times
Reputation: 3393
Seriously -- methane is a GAS. If the levels were increasing during storage you'd have jars and cans rupturing on the shelf and you certainly wouldn't have cans of food from WWI (and earlier) still hanging around to be tested by food scientists. This is basic physics... gas expansion + sealed container = POP!

Methane is produced by bacteria during digestion in anaerobic conditions. Yes, a sealed jar or can is (or should be) anaerobic... but if it was properly canned or bottled, it was also heat treated, which destroys these bacteria. Thermal kill of these decomposing bacteria and other pathogens is the whole reason we can things in the first place.

Regardless of what Mercola says in that video, what he is talking about is METHANOL, which is an alcohol; and he is referencing the study conducted by W.C. Monte PhD. In Monte's study, he also references research performed by Kirchner & Miller in 1957. Whenever anyone starts talking about canned foods causing MS, Alzheimers, autism, and autoimmune disorders, the "meth" they're talking about is methanol.

I would suggest anyone who is concerned about this to read the studies themselves, not rely on someone's interpretation of the data. While the actual reports are a little technical in places, you only need to understand basic organic chemistry to get the gist.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2012, 07:25 PM
 
23,521 posts, read 69,925,450 times
Reputation: 48893
I am a proud producer of American methane! Allow me to raise a home-grown American methane salute to this "controversy"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2012, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
41,728 posts, read 74,675,578 times
Reputation: 66665
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTSilvertip View Post
In this case, it seems to me that either drying or pickling would be the top choices for storage as the drying exposes the fruit to air and doesn't limit the oxygen exposure, and the acids in vinagar while excellent anti-oxidents, will also limit the growth of bacteria as well, with canning running a strong 3rd.
Fruit are naturally acidic. Well, most of them, anyway.

I didn't watch the video because the OP's description alone told me that the video is hogwash. In the canning/bottling process, the fruit or juice is heated in order to kill the bacteria, effectively preventing any gas-producing decomposition.

If a canned product has begun to decompose inside the container, you'll know it when you open the can.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2012, 10:14 PM
 
16,294 posts, read 28,421,963 times
Reputation: 8381
Quote:
Originally Posted by emilybh View Post

What do you think?
That you failed to..........
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Self-Sufficiency and Preparedness
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:41 PM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top