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Old 12-06-2012, 11:46 AM
 
Location: North Texas
24,539 posts, read 34,091,873 times
Reputation: 28315

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Teen says pink toy ovens discourage boys from kitchen play - CNN.com

I wasn't sure where to put this; this forum seemed the most appropriate.

Bravo to her for speaking out; I saw her on the news this morning and was very impressed by how intelligent and articulate this young woman is. She's awesome!
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,978 posts, read 61,676,394 times
Reputation: 55321
Oh, good grief.

The problem isn't with the pink toys; it's with the boys and their parents who condition them to scorn anything pink or to divide toys into "girls' toys" and "boys' toys".

This girl is just perpetuating the stereotype of the teenager who has no knowledge of history and who can't see beyond her own nose.
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:22 PM
 
578 posts, read 1,139,348 times
Reputation: 1254
Actually, if you were to read the story linked, and read the letter she wrote to Hasbro, she's very impressive. It's not just a matter of the color of the toy, but also the marketing of the toy. There are no boys in any of the packaging photos, tv commercials, or any other print advertising for the product. It's not parents who are implying or specifying that it is a 'girl toy' it is the marketing department of Hasbro.

I read the story, I read the petition, and I signed.
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,978 posts, read 61,676,394 times
Reputation: 55321
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieM View Post
It's not parents who are implying or specifying that it is a 'girl toy' it is the marketing department of Hasbro.
You think the marketing department of a toy company is more powerful than a parent? Sheesh!
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:38 PM
 
Location: North Texas
24,539 posts, read 34,091,873 times
Reputation: 28315
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieM View Post
Actually, if you were to read the story linked, and read the letter she wrote to Hasbro, she's very impressive. It's not just a matter of the color of the toy, but also the marketing of the toy. There are no boys in any of the packaging photos, tv commercials, or any other print advertising for the product. It's not parents who are implying or specifying that it is a 'girl toy' it is the marketing department of Hasbro.

I read the story, I read the petition, and I signed.
I agree. Great post!
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Old 12-07-2012, 04:01 PM
 
Location: in my mind
4,885 posts, read 6,846,305 times
Reputation: 9827
Many years ago, the color blue was considered appropriate for girl babies, and pink for boys.

For example, a June 1918 article from the trade publication Earnshaw's Infants' Department said, “The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl.” Other sources said blue was flattering for blonds, pink for brunettes; or blue was for blue-eyed babies, pink for brown-eyed babies, according to Paoletti.

In 1927, Time magazine printed a chart showing sex-appropriate colors for girls and boys according to leading U.S. stores. In Boston, Filene’s told parents to dress boys in pink. So did Best & Co. in New York City, Halle’s in Cleveland and Marshall Field in Chicago.

Read more: When Did Girls Start Wearing Pink? | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,717 posts, read 8,761,390 times
Reputation: 4951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
You think the marketing department of a toy company is more powerful than a parent? Sheesh!
Parents do not have absolute control over the lives of their children. Fact is, they pick up on messages about gender roles through persistent social signals like what colours boys and girls wear and very gendered television ads for toys (think My Little Pony vs. Batman toys) and some do pick up that they shouldn't play with a pink oven covered in hearts because that's for the girls. I knew the oven was just for the girls and asked for the boy version, dr. dreadful, but my brother wanted easy bake regardless of messaging because he really liked cakes. It would be helpful not to market these things to just one gender for exactly the reasons the girl pointed out.
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Old 12-10-2012, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,749,292 times
Reputation: 6704
And who says that gender roles are bad? Gender roles generally have deeper biological roots.

Nevertheless, I had my parents buy me a toy kitchen set for my 4th or 5th birthday. My dad was in disagreement, but I loved all the toy "controls".
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