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Old 05-21-2024, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
15,527 posts, read 9,228,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I bought the Walmart+ subscription a year ago and let it expire due to a lack of delivery drivers - in saying that...

Many Walmarts seem to have at least more healthy/organic options in the back than are displayed on the shelves, at least in my local area. I was able to get a larger variety of healthy/organic options from the online orders than I've seen on the shelves.
For such large stores the selection at Walmart just sucks. They stock a lot of very few items.
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Old 05-21-2024, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
15,527 posts, read 9,228,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Keeping a full inventory is difficult under the best of circumstances in any store. The item has to get sold before expiration date, which limits how many can be stocked, the inventory control may reject large stocking of some items, and then you have "shrinkage" - which no inventory control can account for. Walmart has problems with shrinkage (theft - shoplifting and internal).

There are generally certain days of the week that are delivery days and others where the stock is bound to be low. Monday is a horrible day to shop, since weekend crowds have decimated the aisles. Sometimes Friday evenings work, if you dodge the pallets in the aisles. All this can vary by store and circumstance.

You also have the manufacturers who may limit availability at times, so when shopping at a single store, you can have problems. I generally shop at least two or three stores in a shopping trip. When I find a product that is regularly off the shelves, I either stock up when it does come in, or order online.

The only stores that will send an employee to check stock and even hold an item for you are the more expensive ones, such as Publix.
Expiration dates, except for fresh foods are typically 2 years. Though even fresh food they should have a pretty good idea of how much they will sell, and should have an adequate supply on hand.

The store employees who I talk to usually blame shipping / delivery problems when they are out of an item. But if they screwed up and didn't order an item, I wouldn't expect them to admit that.
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Old 05-21-2024, 01:35 PM
Status: "It's WARY, or LEERY (weary means tired)" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
16,148 posts, read 21,288,283 times
Reputation: 43939
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
Expiration dates, except for fresh foods are typically 2 years. Though even fresh food they should have a pretty good idea of how much they will sell, and should have an adequate supply on hand.

The store employees who I talk to usually blame shipping / delivery problems when they are out of an item. But if they screwed up and didn't order an item, I wouldn't expect them to admit that.
Ordering isn't generally done by employees these days, it's triggered automatically when inventory levels for each item reaches a particular number. Those numbers are 'counted' by the registers recording how many of the items are being sold. Almost all that stuff is done by computers now. Ad mdse is forecast based on previous sales, etc.
Again, theft is a problem since the items being stolen aren't being re-ordered until someone takes a physical count and adjust the inventory manually to account for those missing items.
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Old 05-21-2024, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
15,527 posts, read 9,228,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Ordering isn't generally done by employees these days, it's triggered automatically when inventory levels for each item reaches a particular number. Those numbers are 'counted' by the registers recording how many of the items are being sold. Almost all that stuff is done by computers now. Ad mdse is forecast based on previous sales, etc.
Again, theft is a problem since the items being stolen aren't being re-ordered until someone takes a physical count and adjust the inventory manually to account for those missing items.
This is not rocket science. Somebody should be doing a walkthrough of the store. When they see empty shelves, they should check the store room. If the item is not in the store, then they need to order it. Inventory Control has always been a problem for stores. That's why managers need to manually take inventory at regular intervals.
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Old 05-21-2024, 02:08 PM
Status: "It's WARY, or LEERY (weary means tired)" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
16,148 posts, read 21,288,283 times
Reputation: 43939
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
This is not rocket science. Somebody should be doing a walkthrough of the store. When they see empty shelves, they should check the store room. If the item is not in the store, then they need to order it. Inventory Control has always been a problem for stores. That's why managers need to manually take inventory at regular intervals.
LOL, it's obviously more complicated than you realize. Get back to me when you have an accurate idea of how modern retail works. Especially now, since almost all of the chains believe that they should be 'doing more with less', meaning skeleton crews who don't have time to walk and count the entire store every day just to keep up with theft.
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Old 05-21-2024, 03:06 PM
 
24,816 posts, read 11,233,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
This is not rocket science. Somebody should be doing a walkthrough of the store. When they see empty shelves, they should check the store room. If the item is not in the store, then they need to order it. Inventory Control has always been a problem for stores. That's why managers need to manually take inventory at regular intervals.
And who is supposed to stroll the isles? Grocery is a tight business. There is no extra pair of hands.
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Old 05-21-2024, 05:01 PM
 
1,946 posts, read 873,506 times
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Gah, I hate Walmart, never shopped there until moving to my current location, just not many choices. The supercenter used to be pretty good in the earlier years, even had really good produce, but went & stayed downhill after pandemic, & chronically short-staffed. There are 2 that I can get to, but planning ahead online for what's in stock never works, it's always incorrect, & often neither store has what I need.

I can only commiserate with you & I'm still hoping for a Aldi to come to my area, I gave up on Target.
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Old 05-21-2024, 06:21 PM
 
597 posts, read 323,235 times
Reputation: 899
Default Walmart niche

I have a neighborhood sue Walmart closest to me. I go there for basic beaded items at the best price. My store has tens of thousands of items. You must be looking for something not mainstream, I have a store or 2 I use for that.

I am not rich enough to spend more than I have to on items.
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Old 05-21-2024, 07:43 PM
 
23,665 posts, read 70,718,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
This is not rocket science. Somebody should be doing a walkthrough of the store. When they see empty shelves, they should check the store room. If the item is not in the store, then they need to order it. Inventory Control has always been a problem for stores. That's why managers need to manually take inventory at regular intervals.
First, you are wrong on expiration dates being two years for most food items. Breads, you might know. Crackers? Yep, they go rancid in a fairly short time period. Beers go skunky, wines that aren't of certain qualities can age poorly. Frozen foods get freezer burn.

I designed and wrote software for inventory control in movie theatres back as early as the 1980s, even writing an article on use in the major industry publication. I'll agree that inventory control is not rocket science. Done properly, it can be HARDER than rocket science. With rocket science there are fixed parameters, well known formulae, known materials and their characteristics, known orbital mechanics.

In inventory control in a store or movie theatre, you have "THE PUBLIC." If you think you can figure out and reliably predict public wants, needs, and quirks in an environment that is constantly shifting, you are out of touch with reality.

A small example: Junior Mints have a short shelf life - in the real world, six months is about it. They can go longer with proper air-conditioned storage and careful handling, but in a candy case they need to be rotated out within about a month or month and a half. Otherwise, they clump into a mass, go stale, stain the box, or other issues happen. You open a blockbuster film and they sell quickly. The next blockbuster fails and your inventory control algorithm fails and you are stuck with twenty cases of Junior Mints that WILL decay.

You adjust the algorithm and you periodically are out of Junior Mints, but are actually making more money with lower losses. That is the way of business.

Managers in big stores don't wander the aisles too much. They have far too much on their plate as is. What does happen is an outside auditing company comes in and does an independent audit on a fairly regular basis. With luck, that interfaces with the inventory software and discrepancies are found.

Then there is common sense. Say that Wally Widgets are very popular and 10 cases sell per quarter. The audit comes back short 4 cases. You are fairly sure that is from customer theft of that item.

Your job stability requires minimal shrinkage, and your commission is based on profits AFTER losses are deducted. Do you work extra hard to keep Wally Widgets on the shelf? Or do you make them a little harder to find or steal? There is a reason diamond rings are under glass.
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Old 05-21-2024, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Florida
7,814 posts, read 6,447,847 times
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There is a "neighborhood" grocery store near here plus a "Superstore" down the other way. You have to know which store to go to for which item. NONE ever have enough small shopping carts. They do seem to be getting better at having round wheels on the carts. Found a middle size store, but it is not too convenient to get to.

Publix is closer and gets a lot of my business by default. If I am over that way I will once in a while go to Winn-Dixie.
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