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Old 10-10-2019, 09:40 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
4,260 posts, read 1,135,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
Tactical development phase is around 13, when skill starts to become more important and players begin to think and play as a team.
True - but team development is emphasized for most sports and (usually) is coachable. It’s not so much team skills as raw ball-handling skills which will make a player stand-out early on i.e. pin-point pass accuracy, settling a ball, and using one’s head or chest (and feet of course) to control the ball.

Ball-handling skills can be practiced individually as well - further increasing the odds of being accepted into a developmental academy. That said - most of us played a few sports in our youth; and it comes down to what we enjoyed playing the most in terms of practice time - which doesn’t always line up with natural talent. I don’t think any kid at five is absolutely certain he wants (yet alone has enough talent) to play soccer or set his sights on a developmental academy.
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Old 10-11-2019, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Seattle
7,095 posts, read 1,684,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
True - but team development is emphasized for most sports and (usually) is coachable. It’s not so much team skills as raw ball-handling skills which will make a player stand-out early on i.e. pin-point pass accuracy, settling a ball, and using one’s head or chest (and feet of course) to control the ball.
Yes, but raw ball-handling abilities don't always result in a good player. I've seen a number of gifted ball handlers flop at the higher levels because they just aren't naturally good at working with a team.
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Old 10-11-2019, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Arizona
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When they go to camps and dominate players from other areas. Lots of kids are good in their age group and home town.

Don't turn into a Jimmy Piersall dad.
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Old 10-11-2019, 10:30 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
4,260 posts, read 1,135,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
Yes, but raw ball-handling abilities don't always result in a good player. I've seen a number of gifted ball handlers flop at the higher levels because they just aren't naturally good at working with a team.
I didn’t say it was a guarantee to success (or anything close). I simply said raw ball-handling skills can make a player stand out earlier than 13. Also, pin-point pass accuracy is part of working as a team (and doing it exceptionally well). If one can’t control or pass the ball with accuracy - it won’t matter he’s a ‘team player’.

Team players are easily coached, but developing the necessary skills, knowledge and mental aptitude on the pitch is either there - or it isn’t, at least to the point of having potential in a developmental academy. If the OPs kid is talented with ball-handling skills - or is out in the yard practicing daily to improve with no encouragement, it’s more relevant in terms of interest/talent than putting the ball in the back of the net as a five year old.
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Old 10-18-2019, 11:28 PM
 
263 posts, read 432,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
When they go to camps and dominate players from other areas. Lots of kids are good in their age group and home town.

Don't turn into a Jimmy Piersall dad.
Oh I see. Ok i'll send my kid to a camp maybe next year. Is 6 a good age for that?

What is a Jimmy Piersall dad?

Last edited by dustin183; 10-18-2019 at 11:43 PM..
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Old 10-18-2019, 11:41 PM
 
263 posts, read 432,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
I didn’t say it was a guarantee to success (or anything close). I simply said raw ball-handling skills can make a player stand out earlier than 13. Also, pin-point pass accuracy is part of working as a team (and doing it exceptionally well). If one can’t control or pass the ball with accuracy - it won’t matter he’s a ‘team player’.

Team players are easily coached, but developing the necessary skills, knowledge and mental aptitude on the pitch is either there - or it isn’t, at least to the point of having potential in a developmental academy. If the OPs kid is talented with ball-handling skills - or is out in the yard practicing daily to improve with no encouragement, it’s more relevant in terms of interest/talent than putting the ball in the back of the net as a five year old.
I am thinking a lot about how kids develop over time. It is very interesting. And also thinking about game strategy - how it changes and how it varies so much by coach. Some care zero about winning and only development; and obviously some care a lot about winning. I don't see why the two have to be in conflict.
My kid will play with the ball a little on his own but not a lot; I do train him at home; some ball control drills; some fun 1v1. He gets frustrated a bit but he likes to play soccer (he refused to take a break during games); and I see him utilize the skills we practice in a game and it's awesome to see and it look likes he is enjoying using the skills. So, I do believe that its ok to push kids in a similar manner as pushing them to do their homework, or practice writing (he's learning how to spell now). Sure, at first the kid is resistant because its so new and he can't do the thing well... but after he gets the hang of it he generally enjoys it. Some coaches/parents are against this kind of training in soccer, they think it will make the kid not like soccer, but I disagree. It is something I am testing now, and, yeah, it seems that me pushing him has not hurt his like of soccer.
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Old 10-28-2019, 07:42 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
4,260 posts, read 1,135,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dustin183 View Post
I am thinking a lot about how kids develop over time. It is very interesting. And also thinking about game strategy - how it changes and how it varies so much by coach. Some care zero about winning and only development; and obviously some care a lot about winning. I don't see why the two have to be in conflict.
My kid will play with the ball a little on his own but not a lot; I do train him at home; some ball control drills; some fun 1v1. He gets frustrated a bit but he likes to play soccer (he refused to take a break during games); and I see him utilize the skills we practice in a game and it's awesome to see and it look likes he is enjoying using the skills. So, I do believe that its ok to push kids in a similar manner as pushing them to do their homework, or practice writing (he's learning how to spell now). Sure, at first the kid is resistant because its so new and he can't do the thing well... but after he gets the hang of it he generally enjoys it. Some coaches/parents are against this kind of training in soccer, they think it will make the kid not like soccer, but I disagree. It is something I am testing now, and, yeah, it seems that me pushing him has not hurt his like of soccer.
You're the parent; I'm not. I'm only speaking from my own experience having grown up playing a few other sports in addition to soccer. Many of us played soccer at five - but there's much potential for some of us to develop an interest and/or talent for other sports as we become older as well. Don't be disappointed if, at 12, he prefers shooting hoops or throwing a football.
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Old 10-31-2019, 02:43 AM
 
263 posts, read 432,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
You're the parent; I'm not. I'm only speaking from my own experience having grown up playing a few other sports in addition to soccer. Many of us played soccer at five - but there's much potential for some of us to develop an interest and/or talent for other sports as we become older as well. Don't be disappointed if, at 12, he prefers shooting hoops or throwing a football.
He can play whatever he wants. Right now we're just exploring different things. But what I've seen from his first time on a soccer team is that he's very good. He has scored 48 goals in the first 7 games. Out of all the players I have seen in this league, which is maybe 70, he is the best. So that's why I am wondering if he could be a top player in soccer.
I don't want to push him too hard though. I want him to have fun and I also don't want to be one of those really strict dads. My kid is very silly and fun and I hope he doesn't lose that.
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Old 11-04-2019, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
11,652 posts, read 8,360,182 times
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From what I've seen, the kids who started off as "the absolute best" and "dominant" normally taper off quite a bit over time, while others end up catching up and/or surpassing them within a few years, especially from 10-11-12 years old and up. Just be careful to not push him too hard, and make sure he, first and foremost, has fun.
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Old 11-04-2019, 08:02 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
4,260 posts, read 1,135,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dustin183 View Post
He can play whatever he wants. Right now we're just exploring different things. But what I've seen from his first time on a soccer team is that he's very good. He has scored 48 goals in the first 7 games. Out of all the players I have seen in this league, which is maybe 70, he is the best. So that's why I am wondering if he could be a top player in soccer.
I don't want to push him too hard though. I want him to have fun and I also don't want to be one of those really strict dads. My kid is very silly and fun and I hope he doesn't lose that.
Yeah - you said he’s five. Most at that age aren’t playing too seriously; heck, half don’t even understand the rules or they are waving to a family member or daydreaming while the goal slips by them - lol. I was about five when I was first enrolled in sports, too - and continued through college (but only one sport can ‘win’, ultimately).

It’s great you’re into it for your kid - maybe he’ll be a top player in soccer (or a completely different sport) someday.
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