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Old 09-30-2019, 03:28 PM
 
263 posts, read 431,931 times
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Hi, I am wondering if there is, generally speaking, an age where you can tell the potential that a kid has in soccer (assuming you get to observe the kid play, whether with his friends or in a league). If he is dominating at age 5, maybe that means nothing? What about age 6, 7, 10, etc? What kind of skills or competency must he/she display and at what age to understand if there is something special there?
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Old 09-30-2019, 03:32 PM
 
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if a boy: after his voice changes.
if a girl: after her first period.
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Old 10-02-2019, 10:08 AM
 
895 posts, read 880,908 times
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Originally Posted by dustin183 View Post
Hi, I am wondering if there is, generally speaking, an age where you can tell the potential that a kid has in soccer (assuming you get to observe the kid play, whether with his friends or in a league). If he is dominating at age 5, maybe that means nothing? What about age 6, 7, 10, etc? What kind of skills or competency must he/she display and at what age to understand if there is something special there?
Its nearly impossible to tell. I have seen kids who dominate at U10 through U14 top out and never dominate again. I have seen kids with some skill but certainly not dominating moves become stars in high school and get scholarships. In both sexes. The muscle and agility developments in the late teen years can make a good player great and a great player good. The academy system that is still growing in the US seeks to help see the skills later, but sadly, some things like size and muscle growth are more tied to genetics than practice and coaching. As my youth basketball coach once said, you can't coach height. while the academy system is sure to improve american play in the aggregate, I think it will hurt a lot of players who will sacrifice youthful play for soccer earnings that will never be there.
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Old 10-02-2019, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Avignon, France
9,142 posts, read 5,055,259 times
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Originally Posted by turkeydance View Post
if a boy: after his voice changes.
if a girl: after her first period.
I see you have high hopes for your kids.
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Old 10-02-2019, 02:40 PM
 
263 posts, read 431,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr.strangelove View Post
Its nearly impossible to tell. I have seen kids who dominate at U10 through U14 top out and never dominate again. I have seen kids with some skill but certainly not dominating moves become stars in high school and get scholarships. In both sexes. The muscle and agility developments in the late teen years can make a good player great and a great player good. The academy system that is still growing in the US seeks to help see the skills later, but sadly, some things like size and muscle growth are more tied to genetics than practice and coaching. As my youth basketball coach once said, you can't coach height. while the academy system is sure to improve american play in the aggregate, I think it will hurt a lot of players who will sacrifice youthful play for soccer earnings that will never be there.
Ok good to know. My kid is 5 and is dominating, but I should not be thinking too much into it. He's too young. I'm trying to figure out a path for him so that his development stays on track. He is very athletic for his age but as you say, that could change. But until that changes, I should probably get him into good training situations yes?
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Old 10-02-2019, 05:04 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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Originally Posted by dustin183 View Post
Ok good to know. My kid is 5 and is dominating, but I should not be thinking too much into it. He's too young. I'm trying to figure out a path for him so that his development stays on track. He is very athletic for his age but as you say, that could change. But until that changes, I should probably get him into good training situations yes?
Keep it fun; he is 5 - a kid will burn out and/or lose interest if pushed in any direction. I played soccer, baseball and basketball as a kid. I had the most natural talent as a pitcher (and had the most college potential in baseball as well); but I worked intensely at improving my game in basketball, because I enjoyed it the most. To this day, I play on an adult b-ball league for recreation - so as your kid grows, it’s imperative you listen to what he enjoys no matter how much, or how little, he dominates any sport at 5.
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Old 10-03-2019, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Rochester NY
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I would say you should know once the kid starts to develop a little more physically and the competition is a little more even. Maybe 13 or 14. By son is 9 and is going into his 5th season of soccer. Seems that most of the dominate kids on this team and the teams he plays against are simple more developed physically i.e taller, heavier, etc. But once the kids start to develop more evenly as they get older is when you can tell who is truly gifted.

When my son first started playing on a U8 travel team (coming from a local rec team) we were hesitant that he wasn't good enough. He ended up making the team and struggled at first but then really started to shine once he was switched to goalie from forward. He was fast and strong but he struggled with dribbling. Now he is the starting goalie and loves it. We have done some additional camps and goalie training for him, nothing serious though. Our coaches were great at finding positions the kids were the best fit for. One kids dad pulled him from the team because to wanted him to play forward but he was much more suited for defense. After that change the team finished the season 9-0-1. I'm excited to see how my son does, as well as his teammates since we have all become pretty close, as the competition gets tougher and they are getting closer to the age were most kids either stick with it or bail.
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Old 10-04-2019, 02:20 PM
 
263 posts, read 431,931 times
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Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
Keep it fun; he is 5 - a kid will burn out and/or lose interest if pushed in any direction. I played soccer, baseball and basketball as a kid. I had the most natural talent as a pitcher (and had the most college potential in baseball as well); but I worked intensely at improving my game in basketball, because I enjoyed it the most. To this day, I play on an adult b-ball league for recreation - so as your kid grows, it’s imperative you listen to what he enjoys no matter how much, or how little, he dominates any sport at 5.
Duly noted. He seems to like a lot of things, so I guess we'll just explore various things and see what sticks, and try not to rush into things, it can get overwhelming just trying to find and organize these activities.
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Old 10-04-2019, 02:55 PM
 
263 posts, read 431,931 times
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Originally Posted by gt87 View Post
I would say you should know once the kid starts to develop a little more physically and the competition is a little more even. Maybe 13 or 14. By son is 9 and is going into his 5th season of soccer. Seems that most of the dominate kids on this team and the teams he plays against are simple more developed physically i.e taller, heavier, etc. But once the kids start to develop more evenly as they get older is when you can tell who is truly gifted.

When my son first started playing on a U8 travel team (coming from a local rec team) we were hesitant that he wasn't good enough. He ended up making the team and struggled at first but then really started to shine once he was switched to goalie from forward. He was fast and strong but he struggled with dribbling. Now he is the starting goalie and loves it. We have done some additional camps and goalie training for him, nothing serious though. Our coaches were great at finding positions the kids were the best fit for. One kids dad pulled him from the team because to wanted him to play forward but he was much more suited for defense. After that change the team finished the season 9-0-1. I'm excited to see how my son does, as well as his teammates since we have all become pretty close, as the competition gets tougher and they are getting closer to the age were most kids either stick with it or bail.
That makes sense. My kid only 5 and is dominating, but he hasn't faced much tough competition. I'm getting way too into this soccer stuff and it's consuming my thoughts. My kid is scoring so much that it's making me overanalyze everything. I'm looking ahead, charting his path to stardom lol. But honestly I do think he could play at the college level. But maybe even that's too soon to know. He likes other sports and activities as well so it's possible that he loses interest in soccer.
Congrats on your son finding a position that fits him. I just recently played goalie for my adult team (because no one else wanted to) and I loved it. I think denying a goal is about as fun as scoring one, maybe more so. Using your hands feels like a super power that only you (and the other goalie) have. And I love seeing the whole field view from back there and directing the defense. Make sure your kid is as vocal as possible.
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Old 10-10-2019, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Seattle
7,082 posts, read 1,679,770 times
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Tactical development phase is around 13, when skill starts to become more important and players begin to think and play as a team.
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