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Old 04-22-2008, 03:03 PM
 
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I think it is split. I feel like some people have an accent and some don't
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Old 04-22-2008, 04:54 PM
 
Location: South Dakota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rathagos View Post
Okay Chris!! Bein' a Texas transplant (from California) we say "y'all," "fixin' to," and "wrastlin'" but you have to get the context right!!

Y'all = All of YOU to exclude me.

Fixin' to = gettin' ready fer...

Wrastlin' is only done in the bedroom!!

~Rath (haha)

Thank you for the clarification. I have heard the words before when going to the southern plains and understand the general concepts.

I know that y'all and fixin' are (the concepts), but I may have phrased wrong and apologize for that and the potential misunderstanding. I can understand to some extent where you come from. But I would like to add one thing. My relative in Oklahoma says wrestling as wrastlin', or it seems like that to me (being a lifelong northerner) and it is referred to the wrestling team (and not in the bedroom)

I actually find the southern accent, in various forms (Texan/Oklahoma, Mississippi/Alabama/Tennessee, and Carolina as examples) to be interesting and unique just as much as the NY/Brooklyn/New England accents. These accents along with others such as our northern Minnesota-like accent add flavor to this great nation.
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Old 06-10-2013, 07:18 AM
 
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I know this is a REALLY old thread but I felt the need to comment. There is a difference between East River and West River when it comes to accents. East River has the light minnesota accent that everyone seems to notice. Where I was raised in West River our accents are so slight that you can only really tell if you're talking to someone for an extended period of time and it is definitely NOT the East River accent. I wish I knew how to properly explain it other than it's a slight almost southern accent on some words and a "lack of accent" on others. There used to be a video by Tom Brokaw on the History Channel website that explained it rather well but I can't seem to find it anymore. I guess the easiest example for me to scite is how I pronounce my own name when introducing myself to people: "mahc'le" instead of Michael. From what I've been told it's just a standard "Western" accent (the one they teach people to use in Journalism school) with a TOUCH too much of the southern thrown in.

side note: There's something I jokingly call the "born in South Dakota test" that I'm actually not sure if works with the east river accent. Most people I know who are natively from South Dakota pronounce it "South D'kota." It takes us actually stopping and having to sound it out slowly to say the first "a" in Dakota.

(sorry for rambling lack of sleep and such.)

Last edited by m.wolfheart; 06-10-2013 at 07:46 AM..
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Old 06-11-2013, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Sector 001
13,253 posts, read 9,750,409 times
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Eastern South Dakota from Sioux Falls to Sioux City has a rather neutral accent similar to what major newscasters use. Here's the infamous map showing accents nationwide.

American English Dialects

Omaha, Nebraska and Des Moines, IA supposedly have the most neutral sounding accents in the nation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_American

I think people from South Dakota will call "Pierre" "Pier" versus people who moved here such as myself pronounce it, "Pee-aire"

They also call 'donuts' 'rolls', call 'lunch' 'dinner', and call 'paved roads' 'oil roads'
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stockwiz View Post
Eastern South Dakota from Sioux Falls to Sioux City has a rather neutral accent similar to what major newscasters use. Here's the infamous map showing accents nationwide.

American English Dialects

Omaha, Nebraska and Des Moines, IA supposedly have the most neutral sounding accents in the nation.

General American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I think people from South Dakota will call "Pierre" "Pier" versus people who moved here such as myself pronounce it, "Pee-aire"

They also call 'donuts' 'rolls', call 'lunch' 'dinner', and call 'paved roads' 'oil roads'
I've got to correct you on the lunch/dinner thing. Anyone who grew up a generation ago or longer and lived on the farm had breakfast in the morning, dinner at noon, lunch was what was brought out to the field around 3:00 pm to 3:30 pm and SUPPER was served at 6:00 pm or later. Town people were the people who called the meal at noon lunch and the evening meal dinner. It isn't a South Dakota thing as much as it is rural traditions vs town people's traditions.

I still have dinner at noon.
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
I've got to correct you on the lunch/dinner thing. Anyone who grew up a generation ago or longer and lived on the farm had breakfast in the morning, dinner at noon, lunch was what was brought out to the field around 3:00 pm to 3:30 pm and SUPPER was served at 6:00 pm or later. Town people were the people who called the meal at noon lunch and the evening meal dinner. It isn't a South Dakota thing as much as it is rural traditions vs town people's traditions.

I still have dinner at noon.
I've got to agree with you. Born on a farm 5 miles South of Miller, we had breakfast in the early morning before the sun came up, and if we made it to the house at noon it was for dinner. Supper was in the dark or close to it, in the evening. We had lunch, sometimes a couple of them. While combining, where the equipment kept moving no matter what, they'd bring out ice tea and some hal sandwiches in mid morning, and ice tea and lemonaide with some sandwiches, pickles, chips and such, about mid afternoon, and both of them were lunch.
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Old 06-22-2013, 01:34 PM
 
10 posts, read 19,896 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by stockwiz View Post
Eastern South Dakota from Sioux Falls to Sioux City has a rather neutral accent similar to what major newscasters use. Here's the infamous map showing accents nationwide.

American English Dialects

Omaha, Nebraska and Des Moines, IA supposedly have the most neutral sounding accents in the nation.

General American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I think people from South Dakota will call "Pierre" "Pier" versus people who moved here such as myself pronounce it, "Pee-aire"

They also call 'donuts' 'rolls', call 'lunch' 'dinner', and call 'paved roads' 'oil roads'
It's not that people from South Dakota CALL Pierre "pier" it's that that is how our state capitol is pronounced. It just happens to be spelled Pierre. Most people from SD will correct you if you try to say "The Capitol of South Dakota is 'Pee-aire'."
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Old 06-22-2013, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
18,696 posts, read 39,773,864 times
Reputation: 2147483647
I just had a friend visit and we discussed accents. His dad was a Baptist Minister in Macon County Georgia so you can imagine his accent. I grew up in South Dakota and now live in Wyoming. He now lives in North/East Iowa. I asked him about accents.

He said, "Every person in South Dakota is a graduate of the News Anchor School for speech therapy." He said that when they get a person that wants to be a newscaster, they send them to live in South Dakota for a year and when they are done, they no longer have an accent from wherever they originally came from.
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