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Old 08-05-2008, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sisyphus89 View Post

From what I read about autism, there is no concensus of the cause of autism except that it is neurological disorder.
You are correct about this. We do not yet know what causes autism.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sisyphus89 View Post
If there is no objective way to diagnose autism except observations, I'm not sure how you can increase the range of autism to austims spectrum disorder.
To do this, I think it has to be shown that austism spectrum disorder has a bipolar distribution, in other words it is not just outside of normal range of social behavior.
Autism is a disorder of communication and social/behavioral functioning. How it affects people who have it vary widely. Early intervention helps improve understanding of language and reinforces (and increasing) positive behavior. A lot of discrete, direct teaching of vocabulary and social/behavioral skills happen in early childhood special education settings. I have worked in this field since 1987 and have seen kids make huge gains with the right kinds of intervention. Best wishes for you and your child.
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Old 08-06-2008, 01:08 PM
 
Location: SE
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Shortly before my firstborn's 3rd birthday I had the same concerns. He was not speaking well at all. He knew very few words. He seemed to understand things that were said to him yet he did not communicate the way I thought a "normal" 3 year old should. He babbled a lot. Sometime around the next 6 months his vocabulary picked up. When he entered school he was an excellent student who learned easily and excelled in everything.

My 2nd child is just the opposite. He was communicating with me in clear, proper sentences and singing whole songs off of the radio at the age of 2. However, he is the one who has struggled academically.

As a special education teacher, I think each child is different. It should not worry you so much that you are thinking such words as "autism", etc. Give him some more time and expose him to other children who are a few years older. Hope this helps.
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Old 08-07-2008, 07:45 PM
 
Location: GA
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He could have sensory processing disorder. Some symptoms include delayed speech and hyperactivity.
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