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Old 09-18-2008, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
4,032 posts, read 7,647,159 times
Reputation: 7930

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I have a few questions for those of you whose children have IEPs at school.

Does your child have a Behavior Intervention Plan?

Does the school team members follow the plan?

Has it helped improve your child's behavior? What are your thoughts generally on behavior intervention plans?

I'm trying to get my school to understand the value of behavior plans. I thought it might help to get parents' perspectives.

Thanks!
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Old 09-18-2008, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
603 posts, read 2,231,234 times
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I'm a special ed teacher, not the parent of a child who has one. You're having to convince your school to use a Behavior Intervention Plan? Really? Every school I've ever taught at (in three different states) used them. I can give you a teacher perspective but not a parent one.
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Old 09-18-2008, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
4,032 posts, read 7,647,159 times
Reputation: 7930
I would welcome your perspective.
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Old 09-20-2008, 03:08 AM
 
Location: Iowa
134 posts, read 561,693 times
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my daughtler is on a behavier plan .usually they do follow though with the ieps.it also depends on who the teacher is . but the parent and teacher must communicate with each other on the behavier issue.my daughtler teacher will send a paper home once a week to let me know how her behavier was during the week and if there is a day on it that she is miss behaving she will put what my daughtler did then that way i know .most of all the parent and teacher needs to work together so that the child know you talk to their all the times
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Old 09-20-2008, 06:39 AM
 
Location: FL
1,943 posts, read 8,188,621 times
Reputation: 2318
Quote:
Originally Posted by photobuff42 View Post
I have a few questions for those of you whose children have IEPs at school.

Does your child have a Behavior Intervention Plan?

Does the school team members follow the plan?

Has it helped improve your child's behavior? What are your thoughts generally on behavior intervention plans?

I'm trying to get my school to understand the value of behavior plans. I thought it might help to get parents' perspectives.

Thanks!
I'm quite surprised that you are asking if the school has one, and if it is followed through. Any school I taught at, including the one I am at now, has these, and they have to be followed through.

As for working.....well, if it's being followed through at school.......then it is up to the child's motivation on how much he wants to behavior.....and up to the home to make sure that the consequences being given are working, as the behavior seems to improve.

The plan at school is a very small part toward success.
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Old 09-21-2008, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
603 posts, read 2,231,234 times
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Behavior Intervention plans work when teachers follow them and students are motivated to control behavior. BIPs are simply statements of the disruptive behavior and steps teachers should take to control it. At the schools that I have worked in, Behavior Intervention Plans are the next step--if BIPs don't work and the student is causing severe disruptions, the school has justifications to move the student to an alternative school.
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Old 09-21-2008, 08:59 AM
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,973 posts, read 25,075,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charz View Post
if BIPs don't work and the student is causing severe disruptions, the school has justifications to move the student to an alternative school.
Not according to IDEA.
34 CFR 300.523(b) & (c)
A student with a disability may not be suspended or removed from his/her current educational placement
for violation of school rules following a determination by the IEP team that the behavior is a manifestation
of the student’s disability, except for:
• instances when the parents or adult student and the school district otherwise agree;
• removal to interim alternative educational setting by authorized school personnel for
weapons, illegal drugs or controlled substances offenses; or
• removal by an impartial hearing officer when it is determined that maintaining the student’s
current placement is substantially likely to result in injury to the student or to others.
If the behavior is determined not to be a manifestation of the student’s disability, a disciplinary suspension
or removal may be imposed to the same extent as for a student without a disability, except that the school
district must provide services necessary for the student to progress in the general curriculum and advance
toward achieving the goals set out in the IEP, in another setting.
If the IEP team identifies any deficiencies in the student’s IEP, placement or implementation, it must take
immediate steps to remedy those deficiencies.
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Old 09-22-2008, 09:17 PM
 
268 posts, read 966,222 times
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My son has a BIP in place. It was in place before he had an IEP. I found that it was being followed, but it was not helpful. Now that he has an IEP, his accomodations are written into his IEP. If they don't work, we re-write the IEP.
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Old 09-22-2008, 09:18 PM
 
268 posts, read 966,222 times
Reputation: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimj View Post
Not according to IDEA.
34 CFR 300.523(b) & (c)
A student with a disability may not be suspended or removed from his/her current educational placement
for violation of school rules following a determination by the IEP team that the behavior is a manifestation
of the student’s disability, except for:
• instances when the parents or adult student and the school district otherwise agree;
• removal to interim alternative educational setting by authorized school personnel for
weapons, illegal drugs or controlled substances offenses; or
• removal by an impartial hearing officer when it is determined that maintaining the student’s
current placement is substantially likely to result in injury to the student or to others.
If the behavior is determined not to be a manifestation of the student’s disability, a disciplinary suspension
or removal may be imposed to the same extent as for a student without a disability, except that the school
district must provide services necessary for the student to progress in the general curriculum and advance
toward achieving the goals set out in the IEP, in another setting.
If the IEP team identifies any deficiencies in the student’s IEP, placement or implementation, it must take
immediate steps to remedy those deficiencies.

This is the exact reason why I insisted on getting my son tested. You can have a BIP without and IEP, and then it is basically a stepping stone for the teachers to say "See, we did what we could"
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Old 09-24-2008, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
4,032 posts, read 7,647,159 times
Reputation: 7930
Thank you for your replies. I think a BIP should be a living document and I think in most cases they can't be because they aren't well developed in the first place. I want my school district to write appropriate ones, implement them well so that students succeed. I think good behavior plans are written for the adults so they are consistent in working with the student. Then the stage is set for students to learn appropriate behavior. I don't want them to be stepping stones for more restrictive placements but building blocks for teaching. I find when teams develop strong behavior plans, TEACHERS learn good skills, too!
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