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Old 08-30-2009, 08:53 PM
 
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What's the difference between these two? Is one more severe than the other? Do people with Asperger's or Autism ever become independent? Just curious.
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Old 08-30-2009, 09:01 PM
 
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Asperger's syndrome is high functioning autism. My brother has it. He made $55,ooo working 6 months in health physics, came home and played Ninetendo for the next 4 years. He gets disability for a heart ailment, but he has never been able to function by himself. If he goes to work, he needs someone to shop for him, is friendly with everybody including people who later rob him. Just think about the smartest , dumb people you now and more than likely they have Asperger's and should have support systems in place. It's a tragedy for us, because he is smart enough to clean up , look good when he goes to the doctor, meetings and for 15 minutes , you think he is normal.
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Old 08-30-2009, 09:10 PM
 
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As stated Asperger's is a high function autism. It is an autism spectrum disorder. I have 3 sons with Asperger's. Each one of my 3 sons functions on a different level. My oldest son is affect the most, my second son the least and my youngest son somewhere in-between. It varies from person to person as to what they will or will not be able to do. Some of these children may one day live their lives out with their parent/parents or in a group home and some may have good job and do well, and everything in-between.
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Old 09-05-2009, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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The terms "high functioning" and "low functioning are actually currently slowly going out of vogue in autism circles, because they're subjective and imprecise. They're not standardized terms and therefore are highly controversial. What one person would deem high functioning, another may not, etc., and it's possible to have autism spectrum traits and have skills very highly developed in one area and not in another, thus being both "high functioning" and "low functioning" simultaneously. All in all, not very useful, as descriptive labels go.

The most notable difference between Asperger's and other Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) is that Asperger's is marked by there being either no delay at all in the acquisition of language, or a very minor delay at most....other forms of autism have a delayed to totally absent onset of typical verbal communication development, noticeable in the first year of life. Not so with Asperger's. But other than that, Asperger's the same as other ASDs ...a tendancy toward ritualistic, repetitive and compulsive behavior and resistance to change, restricted interests, and impaired social interaction capabilities. The level to which each of these things are manifested, and how they affect an individual's independence, however, are totally unique to the individual.

Many people think that people with Asperger's are typically highly intelligent, and while this is true in some cases (just like with other forms of autism), it is also just as true that they may be of average intelligence or possess learning disabilities. The cliche is that all people with Asperger's are gifted, but it's not true (though some certainly are, just as in the neurotypical population). It is true that many with Asperger's have subjects of obsession...but although they may be adept at cataloguing all facts and information about a particular topic, this doesn't necessarily translate to being gifted. There have been, throughout history, rare cases of "autistic savants," but it's a mistake to assume that all skills an person with an autism spectrum disorder may evidence translate to savant qualities.

With all forms of autism, not just Asperger's, impairment exists within a range. Some people with ADSs evidence mild symptoms and will have few problems living independently. Others have social interaction impairment and communication impairment to such a degree that they will always require assistance. And there's a wide spectrum in between.
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Old 09-10-2009, 01:33 PM
 
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My son has mild AS and some learning disabilities and some physical ones. If you look at him, he looks normal but if you talk with him, he has stilted speech sometimes, takes a long time to process information (for example, let's say we saw a program about lions last night, he may suddenly make some reference to lions hours later), and he is quite witty and intelligent.

Some AS people are robotic and good at math.

There are many levels of functioning. You'd be surprise now who you knew had autism or AS in your life.
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Old 09-12-2009, 08:22 PM
 
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I'm a special education teacher and I agree that autism presents with a wide range of abilities. What I notice with regard to Aspergers is that with this diagnosis, the child knows something isn't quite right with their ability to socialize with others. They desperately want to connect with others, but don't really know how to go about it. They typically will make many unsuccessful efforts to do so and will become isolated it they aren't helped by the adults in their lives. With other forms of autism, the child isn't as interested in others. Not to say they won't notice others or at times seek them out, or be comforted by family members or other familiar persons, they just don't go out of their way to socialize. We have a class at our school that teaches social skills to students identified with Aspergers. It is taught by a special education teacher who has an autism authorization. It is going very well so far.
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Old 09-12-2009, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cautiousmom View Post
I'm a special education teacher and I agree that autism presents with a wide range of abilities. What I notice with regard to Aspergers is that with this diagnosis, the child knows something isn't quite right with their ability to socialize with others. They desperately want to connect with others, but don't really know how to go about it. They typically will make many unsuccessful efforts to do so and will become isolated it they aren't helped by the adults in their lives. With other forms of autism, the child isn't as interested in others. Not to say they won't notice others or at times seek them out, or be comforted by family members or other familiar persons, they just don't go out of their way to socialize. We have a class at our school that teaches social skills to students identified with Aspergers. It is taught by a special education teacher who has an autism authorization. It is going very well so far.
Wow I wanna live where you live!

My son with Aspergers definitely knows there is something wrong with his ability to make friends, which he desperately wants to have.
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Old 09-13-2009, 11:25 PM
 
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There is hope. You can model some socializing behavior for him, and some he may eventually get on his own. It is a long road however. If I can be so bold, I would suggest that you read a book by John Elder Robinson called, "Look Me in the Eye." It is about his life with Aspergers. It is funny, sad, and endearing. It is also hopeful, because he has had a wonderful productive life while living with Aspergers.
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Old 09-15-2009, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cautiousmom View Post
With other forms of autism, the child isn't as interested in others. Not to say they won't notice others or at times seek them out, or be comforted by family members or other familiar persons, they just don't go out of their way to socialize. We have a class at our school that teaches social skills to students identified with Aspergers. It is taught by a special education teacher who has an autism authorization. It is going very well so far.
Right, and with many with non-Asperger's forms of autism, the seeking out of others is really more often likely to be a craving for routine and the familiar and expected than a particular desire specifically for socialization, in and of itself. None the less, social groups and social skill learning opportunities are crucial for kids anywhere on the autism spectrum, for them the have a chance to reach their most personally independent skill levels. At our school, all students, regardless of their type of autism, are included in small groups dedicated to building social skills at wherever the student's developmental levels are. It may be something as simple as sharing a snack of popcorn with two other peers, for nonverbal students, or taking turns using a toy or playing a simple game. Many of our Asperger's students do higher-order cooperation activities in their social skills group time, and may target specific things like good sportsmanship, and sharing the floor/not monopolizing.
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Old 09-18-2009, 12:22 PM
 
Location: following the wind of change
2,279 posts, read 3,625,529 times
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Speaking of socialization, I have come across some information/resources from a special needs meeting a while back about a certain camp in my area. Camp Aldersgate » Camps and Programs (http://www.campaldersgate.net/camps.html - broken link)

They do summer camps! Excited about going to that (for my kiddo). Now I just wonder if each state offers some kind of activity to this effect. It's beneficial for them.
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