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Old 06-06-2010, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Here
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I watched the NCAA Rugby Championship today on NBC. Probably no one watched on TV. I know that no one watched in person. The stands were empty.

I have not watched much rugby but a couple of things I noticed. I wonder if anyone else watched the games, and noticed what I noticed.

First, the games didn't last very long. About a half hour or so. I think halfs were 10 minutes and the clock kept going no matter what. Oddly, the clock expiring at the end of a half didn't necessarily end the half. Apparently the end of a half (and/or the end of the game) is decided by the officials and game clock is kind of a guideline they use. Are there any other sports that are so informal with the game clock?

In rugby there's no protective equipment worn by the players aside from a mouthpiece. Consequently, there's this element of self-protection when tackling an opponent. The same thing can be found when viewing the old, grainy films of pre-1960 football. Rather than make a head-splitting, shoulder-seperating head-on tackle, a would-be tackler will grab a ball carrier as he runs by in an attempt to arm tackle the ball carrier. It was sort of football from the Red Grange era.
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Old 06-06-2010, 06:35 PM
 
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How does rugby get broadcast coverage while lacrosse is stuck on ESPN? Lacrosse has got to be more popular than rugby.
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Old 06-07-2010, 01:26 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
2,819 posts, read 6,454,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GalileoSmith View Post
I watched the NCAA Rugby Championship today on NBC. Probably no one watched on TV. I know that no one watched in person. The stands were empty.

I have not watched much rugby but a couple of things I noticed. I wonder if anyone else watched the games, and noticed what I noticed.

First, the games didn't last very long. About a half hour or so. I think halfs were 10 minutes and the clock kept going no matter what. Oddly, the clock expiring at the end of a half didn't necessarily end the half. Apparently the end of a half (and/or the end of the game) is decided by the officials and game clock is kind of a guideline they use. Are there any other sports that are so informal with the game clock?

In rugby there's no protective equipment worn by the players aside from a mouthpiece. Consequently, there's this element of self-protection when tackling an opponent. The same thing can be found when viewing the old, grainy films of pre-1960 football. Rather than make a head-splitting, shoulder-seperating head-on tackle, a would-be tackler will grab a ball carrier as he runs by in an attempt to arm tackle the ball carrier. It was sort of football from the Red Grange era.
That would be the game called rugby sevens you watched, its a watered down version of the original game of rugby with 7's consisting of 7 players each side, 7 minutes per half, barring the final which is 10 mins per half.



The Clock keeps going during play unless there is an injury in which the referee can 1. Keep play going 2. Stop the clock while the injured player is getting treatment etc and add that time onto the game clock. When the ball goes out of play, try being scored, kick being kicked, the clock keeps going. Officials have official game clocks whereas the game clock is just a guideline for viewers.

I'd have to say there's no aspect of self protection when tackling an opponent other than making sure we get our head on the outside. Other than that, you don't worry about how you tackle.

In rugby its not about big hits, its alot about technique and making sure you can turn the ball over very quickly. Big hits come and go but rugby players don't go in tackling with the intent to smash the player, they go in to tackle, try and turn the ball over before opposing players get the chance to come in and blow you out. There are multiple things to think about after that split second when tackling the player.

Rugby 7's isn't particularly the greatest way to be introduced into rugby 7's and the quality you would have watched will have been very,very below par.


Heres a small clip of the regional competition in New Zealand, two levels below international standard.


YouTube - Southland Stags vs Otago rugby 2009

This is a full 15 player aside team.

And here's some footage of some big hits, although the title is rather over exaggerated.

YouTube - Rugby extreme hits 2!!!

Also a VERY good explanation of the breakdown

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhWzlT7pY0s

Last edited by mattyj46; 06-07-2010 at 01:50 AM..
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Old 06-07-2010, 07:27 AM
 
5,143 posts, read 5,405,820 times
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I watched it when I got home from giving myself Sun Stroke, last night. I found it fun. I'm thinking that NBC played this because Rugby 7s will be in the Olympics in Rio.

7s is to Union what Arena Football is to the NFL. Kind of a faster paced game, and it might find a niche in the USA. I personally like Rugby League the best.

I thought NBC's announcers did a very good job of educating viewers on the sport.

I can't remember the name of the guy on the Utes team, I think it was Palomo, but he was incredible. They said he is on the 15s team...and will be the HB for the Utes football team. That guy has some moves and speed.
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Old 06-07-2010, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Here
2,301 posts, read 2,033,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattyj46 View Post
That would be the game called rugby sevens you watched, its a watered down version of the original game of rugby with 7's consisting of 7 players each side, 7 minutes per half, barring the final which is 10 mins per half.



The Clock keeps going during play unless there is an injury in which the referee can 1. Keep play going 2. Stop the clock while the injured player is getting treatment etc and add that time onto the game clock. When the ball goes out of play, try being scored, kick being kicked, the clock keeps going. Officials have official game clocks whereas the game clock is just a guideline for viewers.

I'd have to say there's no aspect of self protection when tackling an opponent other than making sure we get our head on the outside. Other than that, you don't worry about how you tackle.

In rugby its not about big hits, its alot about technique and making sure you can turn the ball over very quickly. Big hits come and go but rugby players don't go in tackling with the intent to smash the player, they go in to tackle, try and turn the ball over before opposing players get the chance to come in and blow you out. There are multiple things to think about after that split second when tackling the player.

Rugby 7's isn't particularly the greatest way to be introduced into rugby 7's and the quality you would have watched will have been very,very below par.


Heres a small clip of the regional competition in New Zealand, two levels below international standard.


YouTube - Southland Stags vs Otago rugby 2009

This is a full 15 player aside team.

And here's some footage of some big hits, although the title is rather over exaggerated.


YouTube - Rugby extreme hits 2!!!

Also a VERY good explanation of the breakdown


YouTube - Competing at the Breakdown - Instructional
I found the syle of contact interesting.

To avoid many injuires, one or more of several possiblities must take place when there's a contact sport that has a number of intentional collisions. One possibility is that players abandon doing their "absolute best" in order to survive. I saw that in the rugby games. A player running free down the field will have defenders trying to "arm tackle" him. This was the technique in American football up until the mid-60s. Now a tackler will run through a ball carrier at full sprint. Fairly modern (like 1960s modern) protective equipment make this possible. And even with the equipment, many injuries occur.

In American football there are rules allowing a player to avoid contact and in return he sacrifices optimum performance. An example would be the "hook slide" done by quarterbacks in football. A running quarterback will drop to the ground feet first and forgo any further gain. In response, the defenders cannot hit him.

Also, rules can be added to protect players. In football, there have been many rules added over the years to protect players. One of the more recent rules is that a player cannot lead with his head when tackling. Such a rule would not be necessary in rugby. The problem exists only because the tackling player uses his helmet as the prime contact point rather than arms or a shoulder.
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