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Old 12-10-2020, 08:10 PM
 
539 posts, read 598,251 times
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I realize such a thing would be politically difficult to achieve, but does anyone think there could be anything to gain from better regional governance in the St. Louis area?

Generally I tend to think the "government closest to the people governs best" and like the idea of local governments competing but a friend shared something on the topic that I thought was an interesting read:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/y9sfehajwc...nance.pdf?dl=0

After reading that, I think there could be something to gain for some of the rust belt cities where the urban core is struggling but the suburbs are doing relatively decent (Detroit, St. Louis, Cleveland, Akron, etc.). I posted this on a few other Midwest city pages as well but I thought St. Louis also seemed like a good candidate given the inequality amongst different jurisdictions in the metropolitan region. A lot of Canadian metropolitan areas appear to have done fairly well with regional governance, but obviously the context is different.

I realize there have been repeated proposals over the years on the City-County merger, but would note in Canada these types of rearrangements (discussed in the write-up) tend to be a larger scale than just a city-county merger.

What do you all think?
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Old 12-11-2020, 11:21 AM
 
160 posts, read 61,333 times
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So what you're proposing is for mid to upscale independent communities to be governed by the same people that have been caretakers to the decline of their cities for decades?

Why?
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Old 12-11-2020, 03:46 PM
 
539 posts, read 598,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad1320 View Post
So what you're proposing is for mid to upscale independent communities to be governed by the same people that have been caretakers to the decline of their cities for decades?

Why?
Huh? That presumably would not be the case, did you not read the write-up?

Whoever runs a metropolitan government (whether an upper tier or uni-city government) would have to be elected by the whole region and St. Louis is a tiny fraction of the St. Louis metropolitan area (300k out of a region of 2.9 million).
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Old 12-11-2020, 04:03 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
594 posts, read 526,021 times
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It's idyllic, but unrealistic.

Most folks aren't concerned with regional growth, inequality, etc. There isn't any reason for most StL suburbs to favor a merger. Their residents have little to personally gain from it.
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Old 12-11-2020, 04:33 PM
 
160 posts, read 61,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Folks3000 View Post
Huh? That presumably would not be the case, did you not read the write-up?

Whoever runs a metropolitan government (whether an upper tier or uni-city government) would have to be elected by the whole region and St. Louis is a tiny fraction of the St. Louis metropolitan area (300k out of a region of 2.9 million).
No I get it. Local jurisdictions give up power to a central authority under the premise that "it's for the greater good". It's called NYC, and ask Staten Island how that's working for them.

Oh and didn't a number of eastern european cities develop using the same theory? How'd that work out?
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Old 12-11-2020, 06:10 PM
 
539 posts, read 598,251 times
Reputation: 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad1320 View Post
No I get it. Local jurisdictions give up power to a central authority under the premise that "it's for the greater good". It's called NYC, and ask Staten Island how that's working for them.

Oh and didn't a number of eastern european cities develop using the same theory? How'd that work out?
Well, it depends, it could be certain authorities and not others, and you can structure metropolitan governments in many different ways. While it is true the NYC was the result of a consolidation, NYC still represents a minority share of its own metropolitan area.

I don't know about any Eastern European metropolitan areas that go by this model, but perhaps there are some? Most of the examples I know of are in Canada and Australia. In Canada, it seems to be very common actually.
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Old 12-31-2020, 10:53 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,321 posts, read 6,181,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Folks3000 View Post
Huh? That presumably would not be the case, did you not read the write-up?

Whoever runs a metropolitan government (whether an upper tier or uni-city government) would have to be elected by the whole region and St. Louis is a tiny fraction of the St. Louis metropolitan area (300k out of a region of 2.9 million).
You aren't using the right figures for starters. The 2.9 million metro figure has to include cities and counties in Illinois and Missouri counties like St. Charles that would never consider for one second being under a central government that included St. Louis City/County.

The recent proposals have focused on St. City (maybe 300k population) and St. Louis County (just under 1 M population).

There was talk of the City entering the County as yet another municipality, but it would be by far the biggest single one.

It's just a complete non-starter for many citizens in the higher functioning parts of St. Louis County. It's really a lose-lose for them.

The whole premise seems to be that by combining we will be able to juke the crime stats (since we can't lower the actual crime itself) and get off those most dangerous cities lists. And voila - businesses will move back, the decades long trend of population loss will reverse itself, and we will become the new Minneapolis (before George Floyd of course) or Indiana and it will be paradise.
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