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Old 02-11-2023, 07:26 AM
 
33,345 posts, read 12,665,754 times
Reputation: 14967

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
We vacationed in St. Louis in 2019 and had a wonderful time. Being a middle-class white gay couple that originally hailed from rural areas we stayed south of Delmar because we were told all of North City was "too dangerous".

We stayed at an AirBNB in Benton Park. Fantastic. We explored Soulard, Central West End, Lafeyette Square, Tower Grove Park, South Grand, and Forest Park. We did enjoy the Arch and surroundings but otherwise thought Downtown St. Louis was a joke overall for anchoring such a large metro area. I was excited to see Laclede's Landing until we saw it was only like eight buildings?

Just because a city is declining in population doesn't mean it is undesirable. Pittsburgh is also declining in population, and many people love our city. Both of our cities truly have to rein in urban sprawl. Places like Wentzville, for example, hurt the vitality of St. Louis. I also think the city should encourage more redevelopment radiating northwards from Delmar and gradually creep it's way deeper into the North Side.

I happen to like both cities (St. Louis for baseball reasons, and Pittsburgh for other reasons), but I think many people would say that Pittsburgh's setting, in comparison, is more picturesque.
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Old 03-13-2023, 08:31 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,448 posts, read 7,049,221 times
Reputation: 4618
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Both of our cities truly have to rein in urban sprawl. Places like Wentzville, for example, hurt the vitality of St. Louis.
The city has no way to rein in people moving to areas they deem more desirable. It's just not going to happen.

The city has to make itself more desirable, and, to be fair, some groups of people are more willing to put up with city issues (crime, etc.) to be in an urban area.

St. Louis City still has great neighborhoods where people desire to live. It needs to keep those strong and develop some new ones. Or I should say, re-develop.

Crime and schools are always going to be an issue if you want to attract families.
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Old 05-18-2023, 11:51 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,448 posts, read 7,049,221 times
Reputation: 4618
Default New Census update: trends continue, city loses

4.97% down to 286,000, most of STL County loses population, places like O'Fallon Mo, Wentzville continue to see big gains:

https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/...t_source=email

...the voting with their feet continues.
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Old 05-19-2023, 05:46 AM
 
7,108 posts, read 9,016,727 times
Reputation: 6425
Quote:
Originally Posted by MUTGR View Post
4.97% down to 286,000, most of STL County loses population, places like O'Fallon Mo, Wentzville continue to see big gains:

https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/...t_source=email

...the voting with their feet continues.
With the gains in Wentzville and St. Charles County will be coming to an end just like they have in Town and Country, Chesterfield and Crestwood (low crime, good schools). Immigration is needed to grow the metro. St. Louis is getting old. The metropolitan areas that have the infrastructure for diversity will grow. Regions like St. Louis that has significant numbers living in areas that are 80 to 90% one race or a high level of concentrated poverty are done. St. Louis has a lot of work to do to stay relevant. The good news is it knows it. The big question is will it actually change.
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Old 05-25-2023, 07:44 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
685 posts, read 774,975 times
Reputation: 879
Rearranging the deck chairs. Forget the coast, StL is even lagging nearly every Midwest metro.
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Old 05-25-2023, 10:37 AM
 
Location: The High Desert
16,185 posts, read 10,865,187 times
Reputation: 31728
Quote:
Originally Posted by myuen2 View Post
Yours is the only positive post about St. Louis. Since I am contemplating moving there, I would like to see its good side. What is it about the city that floats your boat? Talking about boat, it reminds me about flooding issues. Did you experience any rising river level problems when you were living there?
Sorry -- I just saw your post.
In spite of the naysayers, St. Louis is not going to go away. It is a gem of a city now more than before. Imagine a city of 300k with a built environment and infrastructure, parks, road system designed for over three times the population. People in the suburbs, far and near, still call themselves St. Louisans. The 1870s decision to limit growth of the city was short-sighted and nearly irrelevant.

I lived there when it was at 800k and rode buses and streetcars around town as an eleven-year-old. I have some good memories. But I go back most years to visit old friends and relatives and much enjoy visiting it now. I was there a year ago and stayed on Pershing Ave. near Forest Park and Washington University. My brother lives in the Benton Park area. We walked most places unless we had to carry groceries or such. The city's parks are great and are used by the residents. Forest Park is the best urban park in the nation, bar none. It has a world-class zoo and other attractions and museums. The Missouri Botanical (Shaw's) Garden is maybe ranked among the top three in the world. There are fifty or more neighborhoods, each with its own character and attributes. As a legacy city, it is compact and accessible, unlike more modern places designed for constant auto traffic. It is the western-most eastern city and has an eastern city vibe to it. It has had an interesting history and influence on the rest of the country. The major league sports teams are impressive, including the brand-new St. Louis City SC MLS team.

I moved away years ago for a job advancement but still call it home. One thing that I miss is the food. Toasted Ravioli are starting to make a national appearance, but I can't say that they have it figured out yet. It isn't the same. I can't make Gooey Butter Cake at my high elevation -- I've tried. What we called "pork steaks" are actually "pork shoulder blade steaks" here -- I finally found them.

The flood issue is an annual thing. You can't build a city at the confluence of the continent's two major rivers and not see seasonal water rises. St. Louis is built on a low sloping bluff, so the water risks are in low lying areas. The River Des Peres rises and flows southeast out of Forest Park and it will have water backing up into the channel near the confluence with the Mississippi that will impact some low-lying residential areas. The rest of the time it essentially drains storm water from much of the south half of the city. The city copes with flooding quite well.
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Old 05-25-2023, 04:44 PM
 
374 posts, read 264,665 times
Reputation: 436
I expect the metro area to stagnate. There needs to be something to draw outsiders to the area. Keeping people that are already from the area is a continued challenge, as well. The local culture has not helped changed perceptions of those who are looking at it from the outside.
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Old 05-26-2023, 08:21 AM
tlw
 
99 posts, read 437,790 times
Reputation: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Sorry -- I just saw your post.
In spite of the naysayers, St. Louis is not going to go away. It is a gem of a city now more than before. Imagine a city of 300k with a built environment and infrastructure, parks, road system designed for over three times the population. People in the suburbs, far and near, still call themselves St. Louisans. The 1870s decision to limit growth of the city was short-sighted and nearly irrelevant.

I lived there when it was at 800k and rode buses and streetcars around town as an eleven-year-old. I have some good memories. But I go back most years to visit old friends and relatives and much enjoy visiting it now. I was there a year ago and stayed on Pershing Ave. near Forest Park and Washington University. My brother lives in the Benton Park area. We walked most places unless we had to carry groceries or such. The city's parks are great and are used by the residents. Forest Park is the best urban park in the nation, bar none. It has a world-class zoo and other attractions and museums. The Missouri Botanical (Shaw's) Garden is maybe ranked among the top three in the world. There are fifty or more neighborhoods, each with its own character and attributes. As a legacy city, it is compact and accessible, unlike more modern places designed for constant auto traffic. It is the western-most eastern city and has an eastern city vibe to it. It has had an interesting history and influence on the rest of the country. The major league sports teams are impressive, including the brand-new St. Louis City SC MLS team.

I moved away years ago for a job advancement but still call it home. One thing that I miss is the food. Toasted Ravioli are starting to make a national appearance, but I can't say that they have it figured out yet. It isn't the same. I can't make Gooey Butter Cake at my high elevation -- I've tried. What we called "pork steaks" are actually "pork shoulder blade steaks" here -- I finally found them.

The flood issue is an annual thing. You can't build a city at the confluence of the continent's two major rivers and not see seasonal water rises. St. Louis is built on a low sloping bluff, so the water risks are in low lying areas. The River Des Peres rises and flows southeast out of Forest Park and it will have water backing up into the channel near the confluence with the Mississippi that will impact some low-lying residential areas. The rest of the time it essentially drains storm water from much of the south half of the city. The city copes with flooding quite well.
True..... good post.
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Old 06-02-2023, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,272 posts, read 2,190,682 times
Reputation: 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Sorry -- I just saw your post.
In spite of the naysayers, St. Louis is not going to go away. It is a gem of a city now more than before. Imagine a city of 300k with a built environment and infrastructure, parks, road system designed for over three times the population. People in the suburbs, far and near, still call themselves St. Louisans. The 1870s decision to limit growth of the city was short-sighted and nearly irrelevant.

I lived there when it was at 800k and rode buses and streetcars around town as an eleven-year-old. I have some good memories. But I go back most years to visit old friends and relatives and much enjoy visiting it now. I was there a year ago and stayed on Pershing Ave. near Forest Park and Washington University. My brother lives in the Benton Park area. We walked most places unless we had to carry groceries or such. The city's parks are great and are used by the residents. Forest Park is the best urban park in the nation, bar none. It has a world-class zoo and other attractions and museums. The Missouri Botanical (Shaw's) Garden is maybe ranked among the top three in the world. There are fifty or more neighborhoods, each with its own character and attributes. As a legacy city, it is compact and accessible, unlike more modern places designed for constant auto traffic. It is the western-most eastern city and has an eastern city vibe to it. It has had an interesting history and influence on the rest of the country. The major league sports teams are impressive, including the brand-new St. Louis City SC MLS team.

I moved away years ago for a job advancement but still call it home. One thing that I miss is the food. Toasted Ravioli are starting to make a national appearance, but I can't say that they have it figured out yet. It isn't the same. I can't make Gooey Butter Cake at my high elevation -- I've tried. What we called "pork steaks" are actually "pork shoulder blade steaks" here -- I finally found them.

The flood issue is an annual thing. You can't build a city at the confluence of the continent's two major rivers and not see seasonal water rises. St. Louis is built on a low sloping bluff, so the water risks are in low lying areas. The River Des Peres rises and flows southeast out of Forest Park and it will have water backing up into the channel near the confluence with the Mississippi that will impact some low-lying residential areas. The rest of the time it essentially drains storm water from much of the south half of the city. The city copes with flooding quite well.
I tend to agree, I actually think the future of the city and region is much brighter than a lot of people. If it took nearly 200 years for St. Louis to build itself into a industrial center and the last 50 years that economy has vanished, it will take time for it to transition to the new economy. I think looking back 50 years from now we will see that St. Louis will be a completely different city than it is today. I'm also sure that at least some of the rising stars of today will begin to fade and face their own challenges. A month ago I was in Atlanta and I'm already starting to see the relative decline in that city. It really was not glamourous as I had remembered it to be and a lot of the locals did not have very much positive to say about the city. Cities evolve change, go through periods of decline, etc. There are many cities in Europe that went through eras of decline and stagnation before finding their niche again. Rome, Berlin, Amsterdam, etc. have all had eras of decline and now they are major tourist destinations of great respect. Not trying to compare St. Louis to those cities at all. but this particular period of regional stagnation could actually make St. Louis an even more unique place, give it more of a sense of place. We're not all glass towers and cookie cutter developments like many newer cities, but the next generation may appreciate the historic feel of the city in the future.
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Old 06-06-2023, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Just north of Nashville, TN
140 posts, read 257,429 times
Reputation: 197
This may be an "outside-the-box" thing to throw in here, but considering the French heritage of StL, I think in growing the city would do well to incorporate more of that, at least in a connotation sense, to "enhance the flavor" a little some. StL itself already has a certain character to it given its history; it should amplify that some more. And as another poster said, I also think StL has a bit brighter future than most think.
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