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Old 01-20-2011, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Bay Area
2,406 posts, read 7,220,952 times
Reputation: 1852

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Personally, we find the schools worthless here and our child goes to private schools. BTW: we found an "A" school on greatschools and guess what? It was horrendous and the education was quite lacking. From what I understand S. Tampa schools are decent, but in our opinion even the burbs like Westchase and Carrollwood schools are of poor quality education. Again, this is just our opinion, and this is our experience after coming from a private school up north.
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Old 01-20-2011, 11:45 AM
 
22,569 posts, read 33,486,494 times
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Much of the dissatisfaction with public vs. private schools has to do with the fact that many parents aren't involved with the education process and expect teachers and administrators to take up the slack. A successful public school education requires involved parents, as funding doesn't include nannies. If one can't be bothered to be involved, perhaps private schooling is a good option.
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Old 01-20-2011, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Palm Harbor, FL
463 posts, read 949,449 times
Reputation: 1294
^I'm just as involved a parent as the next person but every time I hear this argument I think to myself, "There has to be some obvious schools that are better/worse than others in quality, the blame can't fall squarely on the parents."

When my daughter was starting 4th grade (in Central Pinellas County), at the open house we asked what the reading requirement was every week for the kids, her response, "Oh, whatever, as long as they're reading something." We just shook our heads in disbelief, now we set our own standards but not having anything in place screams volumes about the either the teacher or the school itself, especially when you know how much better it could be.
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Old 01-20-2011, 01:43 PM
 
71 posts, read 120,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Much of the dissatisfaction with public vs. private schools has to do with the fact that many parents aren't involved with the education process and expect teachers and administrators to take up the slack. A successful public school education requires involved parents, as funding doesn't include nannies. If one can't be bothered to be involved, perhaps private schooling is a good option.
Your statement seems self-contradictory. You basically state that people are dissatisfied with public schools (unfairly?), because public school requires parental involvement and many people are just not willing to commit this. Therefore, you conclude that the "uninvolved" should perhaps opt for private school.

So, that means that, by your own convoluted logic, private school is empirically superior to public when we control for parental involvement. Unfortunately, this is not necessarily true when looking at socioeconomic and involvement data from the most recent CEP report. But I assume you were already aware of that given that you "find facts to be the most relevant and utilize them whenever posting".

The cherry on top is the fact that various studies show that levels of parental involvement are actually much higher in private versus public schools. Go figure.
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Old 01-21-2011, 07:23 AM
 
463 posts, read 954,165 times
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Doesn't most of the private schools have some sort of requirements for parents in order to accept their kid to class? If private schools do that, their kids will do better than public school's students because of that additional parental involvement.

Please correct me if I'm wrong
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Old 01-21-2011, 08:25 AM
 
Location: You know... That place
1,899 posts, read 2,554,825 times
Reputation: 2059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumermarie View Post
^I'm just as involved a parent as the next person but every time I hear this argument I think to myself, "There has to be some obvious schools that are better/worse than others in quality, the blame can't fall squarely on the parents."

When my daughter was starting 4th grade (in Central Pinellas County), at the open house we asked what the reading requirement was every week for the kids, her response, "Oh, whatever, as long as they're reading something." We just shook our heads in disbelief, now we set our own standards but not having anything in place screams volumes about the either the teacher or the school itself, especially when you know how much better it could be.
I can understand your frustration about the teacher, but picking the teacher is more important than picking the school (to me). My daughter started Kindergarten this year. After deciding that her school was good, I also asked other parents and did my own research on the teachers at the school. I had it narrowed down to 2 teachers I liked. I had a chance to do a walk-through of the school and meet the teachers (in the spring before she started school). After watching her in her classroom, I knew which teacher was right for my child. She was also the same teacher that was recommended to me by other parents. She has turned out to be a fantastic teacher, and I couldn't imagine my daughter getting a better education anywhere. Between her teacher (who I spent a lot of time picking) and our work with her at night, she has done amazingly well in school.
I do not live in an expensive area. In fact, I heard a statistic over Christmas break that really upset me. Over 70% of the kids that go to my daughter's school are living below poverty level. I have not had the time to do the research to confirm that, but it wouldn't surprise me if it were true. My point in telling all of you this is that you don't have to live in a really expensive neighborhood or go to a really expensive school to get a good education. If you do your research not only in to the school, but also the teachers and then follow up with parent involvement you have a much better chance of your child getting a quality education. It is amazing what you can find online. I was able to see teacher reading lists, lesson plans, etc all from the school web site. I am getting ready to start my research for her 1st grade teacher in just a couple of weeks. That way I can get my request in as early as possible for a greater chance of getting our preferred teacher next year. I am hoping I am as happy with my choice next year as I am this year.
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Old 01-21-2011, 08:27 AM
 
Location: You know... That place
1,899 posts, read 2,554,825 times
Reputation: 2059
Quote:
Originally Posted by tewas View Post
Doesn't most of the private schools have some sort of requirements for parents in order to accept their kid to class? If private schools do that, their kids will do better than public school's students because of that additional parental involvement.

Please correct me if I'm wrong
Even if the school doesn't require it, the chances of a parent wanting to be more involved have to go up when those parents are willing to pay for it. I know I wouldn't pay for school and then just forget about it. I would want to make sure I am getting the most for my money.
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Old 01-21-2011, 08:35 AM
 
463 posts, read 954,165 times
Reputation: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by num1baby View Post
Even if the school doesn't require it, the chances of a parent wanting to be more involved have to go up when those parents are willing to pay for it. I know I wouldn't pay for school and then just forget about it. I would want to make sure I am getting the most for my money.
Absolutelly currect, people who pay, they want to have their investment worth money, but in the long run it seems that private schools come ahead more because of parents being involved and not just stricter rules or better curiculum.
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Old 01-21-2011, 08:42 AM
 
Location: You know... That place
1,899 posts, read 2,554,825 times
Reputation: 2059
Quote:
Originally Posted by tewas View Post
Absolutelly currect, people who pay, they want to have their investment worth money, but in the long run it seems that private schools come ahead more because of parents being involved and not just stricter rules or better curiculum.
I agree. Although, I mostly agree at the Elementary level. I also think that with more parent involvement, the kids are better able to learn so they may advance a little faster than their peers with no parent involvement. If they all advance at the same level because all of the parents are involved, then the teachers are more free to have a slightly more advanced curriculum. I don't believe it is a massive difference, but add up the slight differences over the years, and by the time they graduate high school, it could be a big difference.
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