U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 01-28-2008, 03:07 AM
 
Location: Signal Mountain, Tennessee
849 posts, read 2,832,599 times
Reputation: 364

Advertisements

I'm back from my trip. I met with the Department of Conservation representative on Friday. I was shivering from the cold the whole time, Florida blood! Anyway, he was pretty helpful, but I would say that the person out there to cut my trees who happened to be at my lot at the same time was equal or better. In fact, I found in talking with him as well as others that were giving me estimates, that they had quite a bit of knowledge on trees, and particularly the history of the area. The guy I used was a lifelong resident of Trenton, Georgia and for anyone interested, please PM me. Just a good ol' homespun guy full of knowledge and a good heart. He and his crew are looking for work and they give a full day.

I will post some shots tonight. While doing some of the lot clean-up, we uncovered a cave on our piece that went in about 20 feet. A total rock formation that was probably about 20 feet high and 70 feet long, very cool. The lot has short leaf pine, mountain laurel, dogwoods (about 20 by my count) chestnut oaks, maples, other oaks I forgot the name of, hickory, etc. The tree guy said he hadn't seen any black locusts which I got the impression were not high on his list, "good for posts".

I didn't see much wildlife this time (hunting season) but could hear the guns. I did see a dead skunk and was reminded of the song. Several wild dogs that looked well fed, one even gave the car a chase. I think I read on here before, that there is a real pretty blue bird. Not a blue jay, but the color was bright blue. I saw several of them flying and also came across a pack of about 6 turkeys.

Almost forgot, unseen from out lot before and about 3 miles in the distance, we have a beautiful view of a railroad that runs along Lake Nickajack. I got to see several trains rumble to and fro, 60 to 80 cars long by my estimation. We hadn't seen it because the trees were so thick with foliage before in our June and October visits, that will be a nice lot highlight in addition to the cave. The nice thing about the train also is it is nice enough to see, but not too loud to keep us awake!

That is all for now, if anyone has any specific questions, shoot them to me and I'll do my best to answer.
Rate this post positively

 
Old 01-28-2008, 08:34 AM
 
Location: On the plateau, TN
15,205 posts, read 11,555,869 times
Reputation: 10010
Grizzlybear, your own cave ! How cool that would be....
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-28-2008, 10:04 AM
 
Location: East Tennessee
59 posts, read 178,386 times
Reputation: 17
Anyone thinking of doing anything with wooded land in Tennessee should first take a look at Tennessee Timber Consultants. The site has a lot of very useful information.

I contacted them when I was looking at a 33 acre tract. Wade McMahan came out and evaluated the property, since I was considering having most of it logged if I bought it. I was not charged anything. His evalution concluded that the timber would not be marketable for another 20 years, so I lowered my offer and the deal fell through.

I am in no way connected with the company and have not used their services, except as noted above.

Anyone owning or buying contiguous property of 15 or more acres should also be aware that it can be put in greenbelt status, which will lower the property tax. One method is to put it in the timber program. That requires a Forest Management Plan. Your county tax office will have the paperwork, and they likley will have a list of local forestors that can prepare a plan.

The typical cost is around $500, but I just had one done for $200 by the county's prefered forestor. You can put bare land in the timber program, and you can grow timber through natural regeneration, if I understand correctly, which means you don't neccesarily have to plant seedlings.

Another thing to do, if you are planning at all to sell timber for any reason is to go to National Timber Tax Website You sell timber at your peril is you don't comply with the IRS rules.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-28-2008, 11:44 AM
 
11,135 posts, read 13,616,293 times
Reputation: 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzlybear34 View Post
I'm back from my trip. I met with the Department of Conservation representative on Friday. I was shivering from the cold the whole time, Florida blood! Anyway, he was pretty helpful, but I would say that the person out there to cut my trees who happened to be at my lot at the same time was equal or better. In fact, I found in talking with him as well as others that were giving me estimates, that they had quite a bit of knowledge on trees, and particularly the history of the area. The guy I used was a lifelong resident of Trenton, Georgia and for anyone interested, please PM me. Just a good ol' homespun guy full of knowledge and a good heart. He and his crew are looking for work and they give a full day.

I will post some shots tonight. While doing some of the lot clean-up, we uncovered a cave on our piece that went in about 20 feet. A total rock formation that was probably about 20 feet high and 70 feet long, very cool. The lot has short leaf pine, mountain laurel, dogwoods (about 20 by my count) chestnut oaks, maples, other oaks I forgot the name of, hickory, etc. The tree guy said he hadn't seen any black locusts which I got the impression were not high on his list, "good for posts".

I didn't see much wildlife this time (hunting season) but could hear the guns. I did see a dead skunk and was reminded of the song. Several wild dogs that looked well fed, one even gave the car a chase. I think I read on here before, that there is a real pretty blue bird. Not a blue jay, but the color was bright blue. I saw several of them flying and also came across a pack of about 6 turkeys.

Almost forgot, unseen from out lot before and about 3 miles in the distance, we have a beautiful view of a railroad that runs along Lake Nickajack. I got to see several trains rumble to and fro, 60 to 80 cars long by my estimation. We hadn't seen it because the trees were so thick with foliage before in our June and October visits, that will be a nice lot highlight in addition to the cave. The nice thing about the train also is it is nice enough to see, but not too loud to keep us awake!

That is all for now, if anyone has any specific questions, shoot them to me and I'll do my best to answer.
I bet you will likely get a wide contrast of opinion between a forester and a logger. One sees the land as an ecological system and how trees, grasses, water features, terrain, and wildlife all interact. Whereas the logger sees trees as dollar signs growing. Consequently, that view of pure economic worth of trees is very enlightening as you will likely lean which trees have more or less value, their various uses in industry, and the economic state of your stand.

ie: poplar trees used as "peeler logs" for making veneers, Oaks used for pallets or furniture (if you are lucky to have a nice older stand), etc...

As someone mentioned about the softwoods vs hardwood values, I would disagree with them at this moment. Thanks to the Japanese Pine beetle, large swaths of softwood southern pine were wiped out and subsequently, driving prices up. (notice the extensive use of engineered wood products in the housing industry) Hardwoods on the other hand are in a glut according to my next door neighbor who is a second generation logger. Also, there are fewer stands of older furniture grade timber and much of what is harvested ends up as pallet wood. According to him, hardwood is bringing in just enough money to cover his fuel expenses and not much else so he has currently set up a large scale firewood operation and is also mining flat stone to keep from going under. This may just apply to the upper Cumberland region but seems to be a bit more widespread. You may be able to increase your profits by using the value added system of harvesting the wood yourself and having it sold in log length to a mill, that is if you are up for that kind of work.

Grizz, you know that is one thing I enjoy about the winters up here. While many get that depressed feeling when there are no leaves and many days seem drab, I like to see all those things you normally could not see during summer months. All the terrain features are much more clear, you can get a better feel for your surroundings and if you are lucky you will find rock houses or old foundations you never knew where right under your nose.

I have a nice series of bluffs and springs on my property and have taken my nieces and nephews up to dig for "artifacts" such as arrowheads and the like. I would love to see some pictures, and will dig out a few of my own.

Thanks for sharing and if I didn't know better, I would swear you were bitten by the bug of the dirt. Awesome isn't it.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-28-2008, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Signal Mountain, Tennessee
849 posts, read 2,832,599 times
Reputation: 364
You know, until you posted that, I never put that together! At least there were no surprises waiting for me!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
Grizzlybear, your own cave ! How cool that would be....
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-28-2008, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Signal Mountain, Tennessee
849 posts, read 2,832,599 times
Reputation: 364
TNT - Very cool, I must admit. Here are some shots. I apologize, I am no LauraC who is a wiz with the camera. Clearly some of these shots are operator error. And of course, the sun comes out, after my batteries go dead...


Just a nice shot...


Where the train would be is right along the rim of Lake Nickajack - no train in view now...


Bad picture, of Chickamauga Dam at the far left...


Very cool, sideways growing tree. Maybe just cool to me...


Stone ledge, cave in view at the bottom...


Another bluff shot...


Bored yet? We don't get icicles in Florida so this was a highlight!


First house being built in the development.

All in all, I learned a lot and had a nice time just viewing the area in the winter, and also got a chance to meet up with Riverview from the Chatt sub-forum. Unfortunately, time didn't permit me time to meet up with Split, which is high on my list.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-28-2008, 05:52 PM
 
11,135 posts, read 13,616,293 times
Reputation: 3690
Great pics Grizz, I think you could give LauraC a run for her money. Quite the view too!

Here is a shot of the rock house on the backside of my property. The first picture is the top entrance which drops down about 12-15 feet to the back of the cave/rock house. The following picture is inside the main chamber looking out over the bluff.




Here is a picture of my springs that are under a small bluff and I believe you can see the weathering of the sandstone

front yard


Water dripping off the bluff into the springs


Last winters frozen falls. I will update a picture of these this year but they are not as nice as last years.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-28-2008, 06:05 PM
 
Location: south florida
35 posts, read 200,398 times
Reputation: 19
Great pics. Thanks for sharing and thanks again griz for the pics you sent me. Grizzly the log home being built did they cut short on the chimney? Looks out of sorts.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-28-2008, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Signal Mountain, Tennessee
849 posts, read 2,832,599 times
Reputation: 364
TNT - WOW! Very nice.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 01-28-2008, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Signal Mountain, Tennessee
849 posts, read 2,832,599 times
Reputation: 364
There's a punchline there that I would probably get moderated for...

I went inside and it was pretty neat. Not how I would do it, but then that is why we all have different ideas and tastes... The basement was very cool, and the view from the rear porch was stunning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtnbound View Post
Great pics. Thanks for sharing and thanks again griz for the pics you sent me. Grizzly the log home being built did they cut short on the chimney? Looks out of sorts.
Rate this post positively
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top