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Old 07-25-2020, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
29,368 posts, read 22,230,136 times
Reputation: 36382

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The Tennessean recently did a story citing the New York Times that while most of the country has adopted masks, Tennesseans have not. There is likely a paywall here.

https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...ot/5486718002/

I have been in three different larger cities since last weekend - Greenville, SC, Asheville, NC, Knoxville. I'd say mask compliance in each one, at least in the more affluent areas of town where I've been in, has probably been at least 80%, maybe higher in Knoxville. Here in the Tri-Cities, it is notably less.

I stopped in Dandridge last night at a McDonald's to get a drink and use the restroom. There were maybe ten patrons in there and only one other person besides myself was masked.

Costco, Whole Foods, and Super Target are just going to draw a different makeup of people than a small town Walmart or McDonald's.
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Old 07-25-2020, 11:22 AM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
5,503 posts, read 3,202,570 times
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I can sort of understand the no mask thing in somewhere like Pickett County where they have a total of 9 active cases. But here is Putnam where we have 400 active and the number keeps rising, I just don't quite get it. Especially when no one knows how many more unknown cases there are around
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Old 07-25-2020, 01:31 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
12,854 posts, read 16,393,855 times
Reputation: 31179
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRR View Post
I can sort of understand the no mask thing in somewhere like Pickett County where they have a total of 9 active cases. But here is Putnam where we have 400 active and the number keeps rising, I just don't quite get it. Especially when no one knows how many more unknown cases there are around
If my facebook feed is any indication there are many, many locals who either believe the numbers are inflated, and thus not a serious risk. Or they believe the masks really have no ability to protect anyone.
I woke up to this today, I think it's fairly representative of the belief of many here.
https://www.conservativereview.com/n...xtXV3-Gtr62KBM
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Old 07-25-2020, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Jonesborough, TN
697 posts, read 1,293,860 times
Reputation: 729
For what it's worth, I do fear that the focus on masks has some unintended consequences. It seems like society can't have a nuanced discussion about this (or anything) and that we always have to be on one side or another of a simple concept.

For months, the focus was on stay at home. This was largely effective at containing the virus, but was unsustainable economically. Now, we don't even hear about the stay at home anymore, and the focus on social distancing is being far outweighed by the focus on masks. From everything that I can find, social distancing is far more important than masks. Masks might help a little (and a little is important), but do not replace social distancing. People now seem to think that they can throw on a mask and go do whatever they want to do.

We also aren't having any national discussion about the proper wearing/handling of masks. I fear this is because the politicians want to send a "simple" message to wear the masks, but people are fiddling around with their masks, putting their hands to their face more than normal, than the masks might indeed do more harm than good. Also, while we don't know about the long-term immunity from the antibodies yet, the stuff that I have read has indicated that those who have gotten COVID are immune for at least 2-3 months. If that is true, why do those who have gotten the virus and recovered need to wear a mask? I did see that the NCAA has told college athletic departments that they don't have to retest athletes who have previously tested positive for 3 months. That is a good sign of nuanced policy rather than blanket "simple" policies that might be less effective.
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Old 07-25-2020, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
29,368 posts, read 22,230,136 times
Reputation: 36382
Quote:
Originally Posted by jchometeam View Post
For what it's worth, I do fear that the focus on masks has some unintended consequences. It seems like society can't have a nuanced discussion about this (or anything) and that we always have to be on one side or another of a simple concept.

For months, the focus was on stay at home. This was largely effective at containing the virus, but was unsustainable economically. Now, we don't even hear about the stay at home anymore, and the focus on social distancing is being far outweighed by the focus on masks. From everything that I can find, social distancing is far more important than masks. Masks might help a little (and a little is important), but do not replace social distancing. People now seem to think that they can throw on a mask and go do whatever they want to do.

We also aren't having any national discussion about the proper wearing/handling of masks. I fear this is because the politicians want to send a "simple" message to wear the masks, but people are fiddling around with their masks, putting their hands to their face more than normal, than the masks might indeed do more harm than good. Also, while we don't know about the long-term immunity from the antibodies yet, the stuff that I have read has indicated that those who have gotten COVID are immune for at least 2-3 months. If that is true, why do those who have gotten the virus and recovered need to wear a mask? I did see that the NCAA has told college athletic departments that they don't have to retest athletes who have previously tested positive for 3 months. That is a good sign of nuanced policy rather than blanket "simple" policies that might be less effective.
I saw this graphic from the Tennessee Department of Health today.



There have been 67,049 infections in the state of people <50. That has resulted in 88 deaths.
The mortality rate for 50-59 years old is about 1%, and is 2-3% for 60-69. 70+ and especially 80+ are very vulnerable.

There have been 964 total deaths of today. Of these, 586 are over 70. 765 are over 60.

The bottom line is that people under 50 are probably not at serious risk of death in this state. That doesn't mean they won't have a difficult time or potentially significant complications. That said, the majority of the deaths are over age 70 and the vast majority of deaths over age 60.
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Old 07-26-2020, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
13,260 posts, read 7,368,101 times
Reputation: 20732
Quote:
Originally Posted by jchometeam View Post
For what it's worth, I do fear that the focus on masks has some unintended consequences. It seems like society can't have a nuanced discussion about this (or anything) and that we always have to be on one side or another of a simple concept.

For months, the focus was on stay at home. This was largely effective at containing the virus, but was unsustainable economically. Now, we don't even hear about the stay at home anymore, and the focus on social distancing is being far outweighed by the focus on masks. From everything that I can find, social distancing is far more important than masks. Masks might help a little (and a little is important), but do not replace social distancing. People now seem to think that they can throw on a mask and go do whatever they want to do.

We also aren't having any national discussion about the proper wearing/handling of masks. I fear this is because the politicians want to send a "simple" message to wear the masks, but people are fiddling around with their masks, putting their hands to their face more than normal, than the masks might indeed do more harm than good. Also, while we don't know about the long-term immunity from the antibodies yet, the stuff that I have read has indicated that those who have gotten COVID are immune for at least 2-3 months. If that is true, why do those who have gotten the virus and recovered need to wear a mask? I did see that the NCAA has told college athletic departments that they don't have to retest athletes who have previously tested positive for 3 months. That is a good sign of nuanced policy rather than blanket "simple" policies that might be less effective.
I agree distance is more important than the mask. But it's clear that as hard as we try in a grocery store for instance there is really no way to avoid getting 6 feet from a stranger, that's why they promote the mask and are pushing for both. There really is no evidence to support the thought that they do more harm then good. Every now and then you see someone with the mask on improperly, most often below the nose. But people have figured it out for the most part, it's just not that difficult. Again most every medical expert is advising them for a reason.

With regard to immunity they really do not know about that completely so it's much simpler to just mandate everyone wear them, a simple message as you said.
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Old 07-26-2020, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Jonesborough, TN
697 posts, read 1,293,860 times
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You are right, masks are supposed to work if they are done correctly.

That includes washing your hands before and after putting the mask on. How many people in restaurants who put on a mask right before they enter, take it off to eat, and put it back on to go back out the door, wash their hands before they put the mask on both times?

How many people put them on and take them off incorrectly? How many people wash them enough? How many people let others use their mask to see how good it feels, etc.?

I just think it will be very interesting to see what the data shows 1-2 years from now when the data gets analyzed, published in peer-reviewed research, etc. related to how effective masks are vs. no mask vs. face shields, etc. I don't claim to be an expert in that area, but I will be reading those studies and my hope is that we can learn from this for the next pandemic.
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Old 07-27-2020, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
13,260 posts, read 7,368,101 times
Reputation: 20732
Quote:
Originally Posted by jchometeam View Post
You are right, masks are supposed to work if they are done correctly.

That includes washing your hands before and after putting the mask on. How many people in restaurants who put on a mask right before they enter, take it off to eat, and put it back on to go back out the door, wash their hands before they put the mask on both times?

How many people put them on and take them off incorrectly? How many people wash them enough? How many people let others use their mask to see how good it feels, etc.?

I just think it will be very interesting to see what the data shows 1-2 years from now when the data gets analyzed, published in peer-reviewed research, etc. related to how effective masks are vs. no mask vs. face shields, etc. I don't claim to be an expert in that area, but I will be reading those studies and my hope is that we can learn from this for the next pandemic.
I won't argue that this does occur, but is that really a bigger issue than the majority not wearing them at all which was the case just a few weeks ago?
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Old 07-27-2020, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
29,368 posts, read 22,230,136 times
Reputation: 36382
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
I won't argue that this does occur, but is that really a bigger issue than the majority not wearing them at all which was the case just a few weeks ago?
I think today's numbers reflects maskless behavior until very recently.

Yesterday, TN had 3,140 cases, a new record, with upper east TN having 208 cases, and Washington County, TN (where Johnson City) having 68 new cases.

https://wcyb.com/news/local/tdh-206-...Kn3bOJVAWYoKcw

For comparison, Buncombe County, NC, where Asheville is, doesn't appear to have recorded a day of 60+ cases since May. While they are also trending the wrong way, they aren't spiking to the degree Washington County is. Buncombe County also has over twice the population of Washington County.

https://www.buncombecounty.org/covid...dashboard.aspx

I've been everywhere the last two weekends - Greenville, SC, Knoxville, TN, and Asheville twice. Everywhere I've been had far better mask compliance than here around the Tri-Cities. While compliance is better than it was between the county mask mandates and local retailers mandating them, a lot of people still go into stores or restaurants, completely ignoring the mask requirement.
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Old 07-27-2020, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
13,260 posts, read 7,368,101 times
Reputation: 20732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I think today's numbers reflects maskless behavior until very recently.

Yesterday, TN had 3,140 cases, a new record, with upper east TN having 208 cases, and Washington County, TN (where Johnson City) having 68 new cases.

https://wcyb.com/news/local/tdh-206-...Kn3bOJVAWYoKcw

For comparison, Buncombe County, NC, where Asheville is, doesn't appear to have recorded a day of 60+ cases since May. While they are also trending the wrong way, they aren't spiking to the degree Washington County is. Buncombe County also has over twice the population of Washington County.

https://www.buncombecounty.org/covid...dashboard.aspx

I've been everywhere the last two weekends - Greenville, SC, Knoxville, TN, and Asheville twice. Everywhere I've been had far better mask compliance than here around the Tri-Cities. While compliance is better than it was between the county mask mandates and local retailers mandating them, a lot of people still go into stores or restaurants, completely ignoring the mask requirement.
I don't think there's much question about your first paragraph. What you are seeing in the Tri-Cities kind of mirrors JRR's comments with regard to Cookesville. Pretty clear we are seeing a pattern between larger cities and smaller ones.
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