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Old 06-09-2008, 09:33 AM
 
Location: In the Greater Birmingham area
350 posts, read 1,233,508 times
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What, if anything can you tell me about Middle TN?
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Old 06-09-2008, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Nashville
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A very, very broad question. You should probably re-post this in the Nashville sub-forum as Memphis is far West Tennessee and Nashville is center of the mid-region. Try to be more specific as to what you want to know, btw. Thx.
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Old 06-09-2008, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Back Again View Post
What, if anything can you tell me about Middle TN?
It's all good!
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Old 06-09-2008, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
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It's between Nashville and Knoxville.........
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Old 06-09-2008, 03:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinman313 View Post
It's between Nashville and Knoxville.........
I'm with you, Tinman, I love that part of Middle Tennessee (the Cumberland Plateau).

But back to the OP:

Middle Tennessee is pretty much defined now as metropolitan Nashville which covers something like 13 counties. There are a few other areas of Middle Tennessee such as Southern Middle Tennessee, the booming military town of Clarksville, and the aforementioned Cumberland Plateau. But pretty much every corner of Middle Tennessee and even Southern Kentucky looks to Nashville.

Half of the growth taking place in Tennessee is in the Nashville area, particularly along the interstate arteries: I-40 east all the way to Cookeville and Crossville, I-24 southeast to Manchester and Tullahoma, I-65 south to Columbia, I-40 west to Dickson, I-24 northwest to Clarksville, and I-65 north to Portland and on into Bowling Green KY.

Nashville is in what's called the "Nashville Basin" meaning it's relatively flat compared to the rest of the state. There are still plenty of hilly areas in Nashville, however, and in fact some of Nashville's most beautiful and prosperous neighborhoods are famous for their hills (Green Hills, Forest Hills, Belle Meade, Brentwood). The rest of Middle Tennessee is gently rolling and fertile hills making the area popular for horse farms (particularly around Shelbyville and Thompsons Station) and even the occasional tobacco farm. Many of the large farms, however, are being developed into housing developments, particularly in Nashville's ring counties: Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, and Sumner.

The Cumberland Plateau region, however, has historically been the poorest region of Middle Tennessee because the soil is poor and the topography too hilly for good farming. The plateau is now famous for its deep gorges, natural bridges, abundant waterfalls, and for retirement areas along I-40 around Monterey and Crossville.

There are large, man-made lakes throughout Middle Tennessee. Boating and other water sports are popular weekend activities in the region.

OK I'm not sure what else to write, but those are my impressions of Middle Tennessee. While I'm not wild about the sprawl taking place in Nashville's ring counties, I think most Tennesseans are proud that our state capital is such a beautiful city that is finally being recognized nationally for being more than just the home of country music.
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Old 06-09-2008, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
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Heheheheheh.... Sorry I'm sitting here in Florida and I could not help myself.
Is their a actual division lines for west~middle~east Tennessee. Their has to be a town~city that is both....... sections
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Old 06-09-2008, 06:25 PM
 
Location: In the Greater Birmingham area
350 posts, read 1,233,508 times
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Thanks for the great answer. What about Selmer, TN‏? We are looking to buy some land there (About $2,000 per acre) and sit on it for about 10 years, then either build our dream home on the land or sell it and build elsewhere.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
I'm with you, Tinman, I love that part of Middle Tennessee (the Cumberland Plateau).

But back to the OP:

Middle Tennessee is pretty much defined now as metropolitan Nashville which covers something like 13 counties. There are a few other areas of Middle Tennessee such as Southern Middle Tennessee, the booming military town of Clarksville, and the aforementioned Cumberland Plateau. But pretty much every corner of Middle Tennessee and even Southern Kentucky looks to Nashville.

Half of the growth taking place in Tennessee is in the Nashville area, particularly along the interstate arteries: I-40 east all the way to Cookeville and Crossville, I-24 southeast to Manchester and Tullahoma, I-65 south to Columbia, I-40 west to Dickson, I-24 northwest to Clarksville, and I-65 north to Portland and on into Bowling Green KY.

Nashville is in what's called the "Nashville Basin" meaning it's relatively flat compared to the rest of the state. There are still plenty of hilly areas in Nashville, however, and in fact some of Nashville's most beautiful and prosperous neighborhoods are famous for their hills (Green Hills, Forest Hills, Belle Meade, Brentwood). The rest of Middle Tennessee is gently rolling and fertile hills making the area popular for horse farms (particularly around Shelbyville and Thompsons Station) and even the occasional tobacco farm. Many of the large farms, however, are being developed into housing developments, particularly in Nashville's ring counties: Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, and Sumner.

The Cumberland Plateau region, however, has historically been the poorest region of Middle Tennessee because the soil is poor and the topography too hilly for good farming. The plateau is now famous for its deep gorges, natural bridges, abundant waterfalls, and for retirement areas along I-40 around Monterey and Crossville.

There are large, man-made lakes throughout Middle Tennessee. Boating and other water sports are popular weekend activities in the region.

OK I'm not sure what else to write, but those are my impressions of Middle Tennessee. While I'm not wild about the sprawl taking place in Nashville's ring counties, I think most Tennesseans are proud that our state capital is such a beautiful city that is finally being recognized nationally for being more than just the home of country music.
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Old 06-09-2008, 07:24 PM
 
12,859 posts, read 36,390,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinman313 View Post
Heheheheheh.... Sorry I'm sitting here in Florida and I could not help myself.
Is their a actual division lines for west~middle~east Tennessee. Their has to be a town~city that is both....... sections
Here are maps which show the three grand divisions of Tennessee.

East Tennessee:



Middle Tennessee:



West Tennessee:

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Old 06-09-2008, 07:33 PM
 
12,859 posts, read 36,390,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Back Again View Post
Thanks for the great answer. What about Selmer, TN‏? We are looking to buy some land there (About $2,000 per acre) and sit on it for about 10 years, then either build our dream home on the land or sell it and build elsewhere.
Selmer is not in Middle Tennessee. It's a little over an hour east of Memphis in West Tennessee.

In another post you said you'd be happy with a Wal-Mart and TGIFriday's. Well, there is a small Wal-Mart SuperCenter in Selmer, but there's nothing like a TGIFriday's anywhere near there. You can go to yellowpages and see what restaurants there are in Selmer, and you can go to realtor.com to see what real estate is going for around there.

Good luck!

Last edited by JMT; 06-09-2008 at 08:41 PM..
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Old 06-09-2008, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Wasn't Selmer where Buford Pusser lived, of Walking Tallfame?

The State Flag of TN has 3 stars to symbolize the 3 grand divisions of TN.
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