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Old 11-09-2007, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,494 posts, read 13,611,559 times
Reputation: 1397

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jm21.........no i have NEVER felt excluded in those red zones..i have lived in Ft Worth, Grapevine, Grandview, Aledo, Paradise, Graham, Bryson for many years........now i live in another redzone...here in Coryell County, in Copperas Cove, very near Lampasas County line.
i lived for one year in the blue zone (just left in october) in Kingsville-30 minutes south of Corpus Christi and have never felt so unwelcomed, and like a foreigner in my life. i might have well just moved to Mexico. i didnt even feel like i lived in Texas. the folks were not the same at all! they didnt even listen to country music and there was no place like a roadhouse or down-home country western club to go two stepping, no real steakhouses, no real bbq, nothing reminiscent of Texas AT ALL!!!! gawd that was a nightmare of a year
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Old 11-09-2007, 09:49 PM
 
176 posts, read 598,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellestaroftexas View Post
jm21.........no i have NEVER felt excluded in those red zones..i have lived in Ft Worth, Grapevine, Grandview, Aledo, Paradise, Graham, Bryson for many years........now i live in another redzone...here in Coryell County, in Copperas Cove, very near Lampasas County line.
i lived for one year in the blue zone (just left in october) in Kingsville-30 minutes south of Corpus Christi and have never felt so unwelcomed, and like a foreigner in my life. i might have well just moved to Mexico. i didnt even feel like i lived in Texas. the folks were not the same at all! they didnt even listen to country music and there was no place like a roadhouse or down-home country western club to go two stepping, no real steakhouses, no real bbq, nothing reminiscent of Texas AT ALL!!!! gawd that was a nightmare of a year
Thanks for the opinion! Steakhouses and BBQ would be one of the highlights of the move, but can't say I've ever been two-stepping. Not much country music out here either, but it sure beats rap. If I see one more white college girl dirty dancing to rap I think I'll puke, haha...pretty common here.

I grew up on the mexican side of town, and although I had several Mexican friends when young, some of them really started giving me the cold shoulder once I got into my teens or so. I can understand how you'd feel isolated. Quite a bit of animosity between the groups lately.
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Old 11-13-2007, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
22 posts, read 67,114 times
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I totally agree with jm21 about Oregon and the northwest. Sure, it's a beautiful state but natural beauty only goes so far. It's people that matter and(generally) speaking where I live the people are cold and miserable(kind of like the weather 9 months out of the year). I visited Texas this summer and found the people to be quite friendly. Wow, strangers actually talk to you? Amazing. Rarely happens here in Portland or Seattle.
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Old 11-13-2007, 07:39 PM
 
176 posts, read 598,312 times
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Originally Posted by Not PC View Post
I totally agree with jm21 about Oregon and the northwest. Sure, it's a beautiful state but natural beauty only goes so far. It's people that matter and(generally) speaking where I live the people are cold and miserable(kind of like the weather 9 months out of the year). I visited Texas this summer and found the people to be quite friendly. Wow, strangers actually talk to you? Amazing. Rarely happens here in Portland or Seattle.
Yep. We just walk by each other on the street, casting furtive glances at each other...careful not to look at the other person too long.

How was the weather in the summer? One of my biggest concerns has been it will be too damned hot in the summer for me. Anything above 80 is hot to me, and it seems like 90 and humid or 100 and dry is pretty normal in the summer down there. Guess you'd get used to it after a bit.
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Old 11-14-2007, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex
1,298 posts, read 4,069,244 times
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JM21, are you asking about summers in Texas? Generally, it starts in May with 70-80's and some years higher. Later in June is the first official 100 degrees but some years there are alot, other years almost none. Still, high 90's with some low 100's are pretty average and the humidity can be high although not as high as South Texas. Sept. it tapers off to the 90's, then Oct. starts getting cooler in the 80's, although we had some 90's last month. But typically it starts to cool around Halloween (didn't this year though!).
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Old 11-14-2007, 02:29 PM
 
176 posts, read 598,312 times
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Ya...thanks for the info. I was mainly wondering how someone from OR or another colder state adapted to the weather down there.

Originally I was thinking it'd be sort of a trade-off...here you stay inside pretty much all late fall/winter/early spring (except for skiing or snowboarding or something) with the heater on. It seemed like in TX I'd end up staying inside a good part of the late spring/summer/early fall with the AC on because it's so hot. That was the impression I got from looking at the weather history from down there and talking with a friend from San Antonio.

But if someone from a colder state could adapt a bit to the heat and enjoy the hotter parts of the year down there...you'd be set . Wow that'd be great. I could go camping like 11 months out of the year, hahaha.
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Old 11-14-2007, 05:31 PM
 
Location: SanAnFortWAbiHoustoDalCentral, Texas
791 posts, read 2,107,960 times
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jm21, it gets hot here, yes but as you've observed, we have air conditioning. We have AC in our homes, in our cars and in the places we go. Even some football stadiums have AC and one of them has a hole in the top to let the heat out. I call it the 'hole in the dome' stadium. Considering it's in Dallas I sometimes call it the 'holey dome'. We even have heaters for use in winter. And yes, many/if not most stay inside during the 'heat of the day'. But later on the sun goes down, a cold glass of ice tea and a breeze just settles it all down. There are plenty of posts on this forum from people who have moved here from the northeast, northwest, east coast, west coast... wherever. For the most part they've adapted and like it. If you don't like it, call it experience and move on.

Life's an adventure. Don't miss it. Those kids you may have later on will thank you.
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Old 11-15-2007, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex
1,298 posts, read 4,069,244 times
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Another version of the hole in the roof: "It's so God can watch his children play."

If you like outdoor activities involving water which includes camping by the lakes then you should love it!
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Old 11-15-2007, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Texas
327 posts, read 714,916 times
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Summers in Texas can be hell on earth for people not accustomed to them.

You can expect heat indexes of around 105-110 degrees as the norm. In the morning and late at night you can look forward to 100% humidity. It's doesn't bother me, but I've lived here most my life.

On the bright side, nothing is better than a cool, clear 70 degree day in, say, January when a lot of people elsewhere are buried in snow and freezing.
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Old 11-15-2007, 06:15 PM
 
176 posts, read 598,312 times
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Ya...didn't realize how nice a mild winter was until I lived in SoCal for a bit.

Now I think about winters here, especially living in an apt and having to park outside...go out early to scrape the frost of the windows of your car and let it defrost...go from your nice warm apt to the ice-cold leather seats...takes an extra 15 minutes or so...it's foggy as hell where I live right now in the morning...argh...I think after this winter I'll be more than willing to take a gamble on hot summers .

And being warm in the early morning in summer is nice for fishing. Go fishing in the morning and then take a siesta in the afternoon I guess? Tried fishing on a mountain lake here over spring break....holy mother of god was that cold!
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