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Old 09-11-2013, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,050 posts, read 597,413 times
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Hello Forum,

My husband and I will probably begin our effort to relocate this coming year to Amarillo from Corpus. I wonder how these two places compare overall, in their respective ways.

Obviously they have climactic and geographic differences. Anybody know about cultural differences, or simply the prevailing sensibilities? For example, people here in Corpus are laidback and friendly. I'm sure people are in Amarillo too, but what are some differences besides the obvious ones?

For instance, it's really windy in Amarillo as it is here, but I'm sure the gulf breezes may not resemble the wind you get up there. And it's a coastal plain here instead of the Llano Estacado. So of course these qualities are similar.

Excuse me if this sounds like a silly question--I really am curious
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Old 09-11-2013, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Bedrolls now in NM and in TX.
13,279 posts, read 18,097,877 times
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Sorry I can't help. I worked at Corpus for six weeks back in the 1980s but that's about all I know about it. I can say the summer humidity will definitely be different between the Gulf Coast and the Panhandle. As far as people, I think you'll find Texans are Texans no matter where you find them.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
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Biggest differences I an think of are those you're already aware of:

Ocean front vs waterless plains.
Heavy salty air vs brisk dry often dusty winds.
Ample native trees vs virtually none other than transplanted.
Marine culture vs cowboy culture.

As for people, that usually is more a function of your own sociability (ability to adapt).

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Old 09-12-2013, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Buy snow gear... Unlike CC, it snows in Amarillo... EVERY winter and A LOT.
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Old 09-12-2013, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,050 posts, read 597,413 times
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I look forward to the cold weather and snow.

Are there good Mexican restaurants, is there a bookstore w/ a coffee bar?
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Old 09-12-2013, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Texas
709 posts, read 1,230,143 times
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First off, welcome to Amarillo!
First, I have spent the last 30 years around the Tx Panhandle, fairly familiar with Amarillo, but the last 3 years I have lived and worked right outside Ama. Second, I have never been to Corpus Christi, so can't offer any sort of comparisons at all.

Quote:
Obviously they have climactic and geographic differences. Anybody know about cultural differences, or simply the prevailing sensibilities? For example, people here in Corpus are laidback and friendly. I'm sure people are in Amarillo too, but what are some differences besides the obvious ones?
Folks are pretty conservative up here, but there are folks more liberal than many would suspect in the mix. There are plenty of rednecks, but most of them are nice. Amarillo is more of a blue collar town with some nice paying blue collar jobs, so you will find some of those rednecks have some disposable income too... hehe Seriously, if you like outdoors, Palo Duro Canyon is a fantastic place to explore, if you like Jeeping, there are jeep trails north of town at the river, and there are some real great folks that you will meet doing both. There is a bar scene, regional baseball, hockey, and indoor football teams, and a symphony. You will find the exact sort of folks at all those things you would anywhere else. There are plenty of churches all over town, lots of eating places, a decent mall, and several different school districts to choose from. If you are looking at schools, I will point you at the districts so you can decide yourself. In short, I can guarantee you will find an unpleasant person or two, but will also guarantee you will find loads of very good, solid type of folks that are worth being friends with.

Quote:
For instance, it's really windy in Amarillo as it is here, but I'm sure the gulf breezes may not resemble the wind you get up there. And it's a coastal plain here instead of the Llano Estacado. So of course these qualities are similar.
It is not breezy here, it is just plain windy. This time of year is not too bad, but there is ALWAYS wind. Always. Like a day without wind is something you actually notice. In the spring there is usually some sort of landscape in the wind too. That said, Lubbock (hour and a half south) is not quite as windy but has WAY more stuff floating in the wind. The wind is a bit cleaner here, but it is always present. The only trees around here are the ones in folks yards, so right at your front door level the wind is not quite as bad.

Quote:
Excuse me if this sounds like a silly question--I really am curious
No silly question, fire off some more! Oh wait, I will quote the next ones you had, then open it up for more!

Quote:
I look forward to the cold weather and snow.
It gets cold here, but only for short periods. The next week you might find yourself dragging out the shorts again. It does snow, and when it does occasionally it is real ugly. Had like 18" in one night last year, that literally stopped traffic in the middle of the street. It was the worst I have ever seen, but was all melted in a week. When it snows, it gets icy and ugly, but usually only does it a few times each year. Then it warms up and melts off quickly. Car body repair places stay in business from the flurry of activity during ice storms, and the spring hail storms. Oh yeah, it hails here every year too. Bangs up cars and roofs, but mostly gives everyone the chance to complain about something other than the wind.

Quote:
Are there good Mexican restaurants, is there a bookstore w/ a coffee bar?
Good Mexican restaurants.... *YES*Then yes again, with a heaping helping of YES!!! Mexican places litter the town, and they all have their good points. Lots of different styles of Mexican, I bet you will find one or more you like. I have made it a mission to try as many as I can, but end up going back to the same 3 or 4 because I like them so much.

Bookstore w/ a coffee bar? Well, there is Barnes and Noble (I think they are still open, but dunno for sure), and a regional chain called Hastings. I occasionally visit Hastings to take my teen and preteen to look for video games, but don't do coffee bars, so have never bought anything there. Seems there are coffee places stuck everywhere though.

Now, shoot any more questions and I will be glad to give you my (very biased) best answer!
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Old 09-13-2013, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,050 posts, read 597,413 times
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I really hope our move works out. I am very excited about planning to move there.

I'm a SAHM and my husband teaches, so I'm expecting a bit of patience on our part is in order to make this move more of a reality. Our two children are both around toddler age, so provided we can make our way up there, we've got a bit of time to figure out where to send them.

But from what I'm gathering people in Amarillo tend to be down to earth, which is really nice. I've often wondered how a place's geography might influence its culture, and the impression I get is the wide open sky and simplicity of the terrain-- the immediate terrain-- might lend to an attitude that is straight forward and unpretentious.

Thanks losttechnician for answering w/ such great details

Amarillo would have everything our family could want.
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Old 09-13-2013, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Texas
709 posts, read 1,230,143 times
Reputation: 917
You're welcome!

I neglected to mention that even though Amarillo does not have every convenience in the world, they are short drives away. I regularly hit the DFW metroplex to visit my brother, and it is maybe 5-6 hours, depending on where exactly you are headed. Great highway travel the whole way too. Oklahoma City is about the same, as is Albuquerque the other direction, and Colorado is close enough for maybe a long weekend. Lots of folks snow ski around here too, although you gotta drive a few hours into New Mexico to do so.

Heading south towards Lubbock, it turns into flat farmland real quick. East gets more rolling, north kinda flat. West turns desert fairly quick. Interesting change in scenery.

Hit me up with more specific questions if/when you actually get a start this direction.
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Old 09-13-2013, 09:35 PM
 
Location: high plains
794 posts, read 820,548 times
Reputation: 625
Quote:
Originally Posted by losttechnician View Post
You're welcome!

I neglected to mention that even though Amarillo does not have every convenience in the world, they are short drives away. I regularly hit the DFW metroplex to visit my brother, and it is maybe 5-6 hours, depending on where exactly you are headed. Great highway travel the whole way too. Oklahoma City is about the same, as is Albuquerque the other direction, and Colorado is close enough for maybe a long weekend. Lots of folks snow ski around here too, although you gotta drive a few hours into New Mexico to do so.

Heading south towards Lubbock, it turns into flat farmland real quick. East gets more rolling, north kinda flat. West turns desert fairly quick. Interesting change in scenery.

Hit me up with more specific questions if/when you actually get a start this direction.
It's a nice little affordable city with good folks, good food, and stuff to do, but the location is the best thing about it, in my opinion. bbq, tex-mex, and real-mex is all around you, with green chile cheeseburgers nearby. The weather is usually interesting, the skies are big, the wind is brisk, and desert/mountain altitudes with NM is only an hour away, and CO only a few hours away. Native grasslands are northeast to visit if you get tired of the canyon. Easy living, if you shelter your car and they can sustain a water supply. Of course, it is still Texas, with all that implies.
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Old 09-13-2013, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,050 posts, read 597,413 times
Reputation: 309
Sounds like home, my kind of place.
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