Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-20-2016, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Dallas
2,413 posts, read 3,459,991 times
Reputation: 4129

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BCB View Post
I completely agree with Jasonsim.

Lower-end stores need to be replaced with higher-end stores.

This is no different than replacing old, low-density apartments with higher-end, high-density apartments.

This is what happens when a city is doing well and I'm disappointed others don't see it.
I personally feel like if anything should go first, it should be the food court. Even if it's replaced by restaurants or a Starbucks. The line at Starbucks every Christmas season is absolutely outrageous. I usually end up going to the coffee place at Nordstrom or Neiman Marcus. The food court is a lot of wasted space. They might even be able to cram a small department store in that area.
__________________
MODERATOR FOR AUSTIN, DALLAS, FORT LAUDERDALE, & TEXAS
Terms of Service/FAQ/Information for Realtors
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-20-2016, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Dallas,Texas
6,619 posts, read 9,829,628 times
Reputation: 3386
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCB View Post
I completely agree with Jasonsim.

Lower-end stores need to be replaced with higher-end stores.

This is no different than replacing old, low-density apartments with higher-end, high-density apartments.

This is what happens when a city is doing well and I'm disappointed others don't see it.
Do you think a 2 million sq ft mall can remain as the #1 mall in North Texas as a totally high end mall? There's a small percent that can actually afford those high-end brands. I'm not knocking people who can afford to shop there, but the vast majority of Dallas cannot. People will shop where they can afford and I expect more people to find other shopping options.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 07:37 PM
 
5,673 posts, read 7,382,622 times
Reputation: 2739
I think they should just complete the second level and add more upscale stores in that space. The normal stores should stay. And honestly....... if they did complete the second level that would be more than enough new space to add high-end and even more regular stores.....There's a WAITING LIST of stores trying to get in this high-grossing center.......A Win/Win situation is always the best way to go.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 08:47 PM
BCB
 
1,005 posts, read 1,771,542 times
Reputation: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallaz View Post
Do you think a 2 million sq ft mall can remain as the #1 mall in North Texas as a totally high end mall?
NorthPark has, for years, been adding higher-end clothing boutiques for years. Nothing's changed.

Look how successful Bal Harbour is.

Furthermore, there are countless bridge and designer brands Dallas is without.

Where do you propose they go?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Dallas,Texas
6,619 posts, read 9,829,628 times
Reputation: 3386
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCB View Post
NorthPark has, for years, been adding higher-end clothing boutiques for years. Nothing's changed.

Look how successful Bal Harbour is.

Furthermore, there are countless bridge and designer brands Dallas is without.

Where do you propose they go?
Bal Harbor isn't the size of NorthPark and its in a very wealthy town. I'm not against high-end stores, I just think there needs to be a balance. I just find it hard to believe that NorthPark can succeed (in its current form) with nothing but luxury stores. You alienate certain consumers when you have stores catering to only one demographic. There are people who drive all over the Metroplex just to shop at NorthPark. Many like it because of the mixture of quality stores and entertainment options that it has. I feel like people who currently spend money at NorthPark, will take their money elsewhere once they realize they no longer can afford to shop at NorthPark.

They could always open shops in Uptown, Preston Center, Oak Lawn, etc. Some of those areas are growing a good pace...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 09:58 PM
 
Location: C.R. K-T
6,202 posts, read 11,378,031 times
Reputation: 3804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
That part got me as well lol.
Apparently The Galleria could have stayed exclusive if it only stopped in Galleria 1. But they expanded to Galleria 2, 3 (now 6), 4, 5, and 6. What Northpark is doing between Neiman's-Dillard's (or was it Nordstrom-Neiman's? Can't remember. It's been a couple of years since my 2 hour visit.) is the equivalent of Simon kicking-out the tenants of Galleria 4 for being too middle-class and replacing them with more luxury stores.

That alone will kill The Galleria, which is the centralized mall of Houston and attracts suburbanites who forego shopping in their local mall to visit The Galleria instead. After getting used to shopping in The Galleria, why would anyone go back to the drab neighborhood suburban mall with lackluster atmosphere? BTW Who exactly shops at Northpark?

But Northpark is far from the booming ever-expanding suburbs of the Plano/Frisco area. The luxury segment has been fragmented in Dallas with Highland Park Village, Preston Village, and maybe others I missed since I'm not too familiar. (How many could there be?)

From my observation, the Dallas Galleria is declining to Northpark. I was impressed when I later learned that the Tuileriesque-wing between Nordstrom and Macy's (to completely enclose the mall) is a recent addition. Decor and shape remind me me a little bit of the similarly H-shaped South Coast Plaza in The O.C. The modern/contemporary art made it feel less of a mall and more of a (¡¡¡free!!! 7 day-a-week art) museum--very unique! Wish The Galleria felt less sterile with some museum-quality art (good idea!).

A little critique and praise for Northpark and the Dallas luxury scene.--(See, I'm not a Houston homer! )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 11:14 PM
 
Location: San Antonio. Tx 78209
2,649 posts, read 7,406,755 times
Reputation: 1763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallaz View Post
Bal Harbor isn't the size of NorthPark and its in a very wealthy town. I'm not against high-end stores, I just think there needs to be a balance. I just find it hard to believe that NorthPark can succeed (in its current form) with nothing but luxury stores. You alienate certain consumers when you have stores catering to only one demographic. There are people who drive all over the Metroplex just to shop at NorthPark. Many like it because of the mixture of quality stores and entertainment options that it has. I feel like people who currently spend money at NorthPark, will take their money elsewhere once they realize they no longer can afford to shop at NorthPark.

They could always open shops in Uptown, Preston Center, Oak Lawn, etc. Some of those areas are growing a good pace...
I don't think that northpark is afraid of losing shoppers that would mostly likely shop at town east, southwest center or Irving mall. After the expansion the quality of the clientele definitely declined at north park, probably due to the loss of valley view and Richardson square and the addition of the food court, movie theater and lower end middle class stores.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2016, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Dallas,Texas
6,619 posts, read 9,829,628 times
Reputation: 3386
Quote:
Originally Posted by smuboy86 View Post
I don't think that northpark is afraid of losing shoppers that would mostly likely shop at town east, southwest center or Irving mall. After the expansion the quality of the clientele definitely declined at north park, probably due to the loss of valley view and Richardson square and the addition of the food court, movie theater and lower end middle class stores.
If that's the case, they should have never expanded the mall. It's nearly impossible to keep it exclusive with a retail space that large. I have yet to hear of a mall that's totally high end, that's in the 2 million sq ft range.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2016, 12:00 AM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
256 posts, read 468,981 times
Reputation: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
This attitude is why Dallas is considered too snobby. Can anything good come from a mall catering exclusively for the rich 1%ers? Why chase away middle-class shoppers who drove down the freeway from the suburbs to go back to their local mall? Not even the (Houston) Galleria is that exclusive--and that's the gold standard of luxury.
It is not that Northpark is becoming "snobby", it is that Northpark is pruning its tenants to allow it be remain a shopping destination (it is after all one of the seven Modern Retail Wonders of the World) instead of another Galleria (Dallas or Houston), look at how the Galleria's are both filled with plenty of higher/lower tenants, but plagued with subpar stores that deserve to be in the strip malls down the street.

The shopping dynamic of Dallas is changing, with all these new streets/areas becoming popular (i.e. Knox-Henderson, Main Street, Bishop Arts, Mockingbird Station, etc the list goes on an on), Northpark is redefining itself, and allowing the stores that can survive in those areas go to bring in a more exclusive tenant to Northpark whether that be luxury or low end (i.e. Longchamp, Underarmour, NYX Cosmetic, Sam Edelman). It is not the fact that the stores I wish to see leave are all lower end, it is that they can be found elsewhere in a 10 mile radius and Northpark deserves a better tenant list.

The profit that Northpark annually pulls in has only increased over the years, so the increase in luxury retailers over the years has not negatively affected that growth. They make much higher sales per square foot of the other retailers so the overall center profitability will not be affected. As the Galleria Houston is attempting the correct the atrocity of the countless expansions to reach its current 2,237,000 square feet with annual sales of per square foot of $987, it can meanwhile be compared to Northpark's 2,000,000 sq ft $1.1 billion annual sales ($930 sales PSF), showing that size in the case does not favor the former.

And the Houston Galleria will never be the gold standard, that belongs the the art filled halls and ornate floral displays of Northpark Center (Everyone already knows that! Why else would there be Northpark Gold??).

-Anyways this is not a Dallas v. Houston thread, it is just to keep updated on the state shopping.

NorthPark Gold & Gift Cards | The Art of Shopping
Attached Thumbnails
Texas: A Shopping Paradise-coins_-1-.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2016, 12:36 AM
 
Location: C.R. K-T
6,202 posts, read 11,378,031 times
Reputation: 3804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasonsim View Post
As the Galleria Houston is attempting the correct the atrocity of the countless expansions to reach its current 2,237,000 square feet with annual sales of per square foot of $987, it can meanwhile be compared to Northpark's 2,000,000 sq ft $1.1 billion annual sales ($930 sales PSF), showing that size in the case does not favor the former.
I think it's a difference in philosophies. The Galleria is a shopping palace that sells everything from middle-class to luxury. It's like what Fashion Show Mall in Las Vegas should be (was disappointed to see that it was just a typical suburban mall plopped onto The Strip).

Northpark is what Upper Kirby is trying to emulate; exclusive and upscale. Maybe a little classist, but Dallas is known for it's snob-appeal and Parisian-style self-assured arrogance! Might as well start charging for parking to separate the plebs from the patricians.

Quote:
And the Houston Galleria will never be the gold standard, that belongs the the art filled halls and ornate floral displays of Northpark Center (Everyone already knows that! Why else would there be Northpark Gold??).
Northpark is not well known outside of Dallas. (Even Jay Leno assumed that his guest was talking about The Galleria when he was shopping in Texas, but the guest couldn't remember the name of the mall but vaguely remembered the art in the halls.) South Coast Plaza beats both in revenue--tourists are willing to skip Rodeo Drive to shop there! Not bad for the Segerstrom's old lima bean field.

The Galleria, for better or worse, is Houston's main attraction. International shoppers flock to that mall straight from Bush and stay at an area hotel. I liken it to what Greenbelt/Glorietta in Makati does for The Philippines.

Already said on my second post that I appreciated the art in the mall. Speaking of gold, the gold is tarnishing on the famous Campbell Center; just around the corner from the mall! I remember seeing that on the Dallas TV show opens and was disappointed to see that as I left the mall a couple years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top